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Name: Brian
Syracuse, NY (Zone 5b)
Houseplants
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GraceHazel
Jan 20, 2018 4:29 PM CST
What kind of plant is this? What is the care?
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Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Jan 20, 2018 6:25 PM CST
It reminds me a little of Asparagus Fern (Asparagus densiflorus 'Sprengeri')
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


Greece (Zone 10b)
Houseplants Foliage Fan Cactus and Succulents Tropicals Aroids Bromeliad
Orchids Region: Europe Garden Art Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Cat Lover
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Faridat
Jan 21, 2018 2:38 PM CST
I agree, it is Asparagus fern. This particular one can be grown indoors but it is best if you have a balcony or a garden to take it outside in the summer. It doesn't love the heat and needs cooler temperature. Keep it away from heaters. Needs a higher humidity, you can group it with other humidity lovin' plants if you have some, that would help. Spraying helps in my opinion.
In some Native languages the term for plants translates to "those who take care of us."
Robin Wall Kimmerer
Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
Image
plantladylin
Jan 21, 2018 2:59 PM CST
They grow in-ground, in full sun and shade here in Florida but I think they are prettier in a shady situation. I've never grown one as an indoor container plant so I can't offer advice on care of one as a houseplant.

They are quite invasive here in Florida and once established, extremely difficult to dig out. I remember years ago when we were trying to eradicate many of them from our yard; my husband dug around the base of one, got a heavy dock line from his boat and tied it around the base of the plant, attached it to the undercarriage of his big pickup truck and tried to pull it out ... the rope broke! Large, mature plants are quite thorny too!

This photo is 12 years ago; a plant growing in our yard in full sun:
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~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


Greece (Zone 10b)
Houseplants Foliage Fan Cactus and Succulents Tropicals Aroids Bromeliad
Orchids Region: Europe Garden Art Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Cat Lover
Image
Faridat
Jan 21, 2018 3:15 PM CST
I wish it could survive this heat over here, how beautiful it is plantladylin! Yes, they get thorny!
In some Native languages the term for plants translates to "those who take care of us."
Robin Wall Kimmerer
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Jan 22, 2018 8:28 PM CST
As indoor potted plants, Asparagus Ferns do best in a moderately sunny window. Water it thoroughly as soon as the soil surface feels almost dry. They have large tuberous roots that use lots of water and grow rapidly. It will need to be repotted more frequently than most other indoor plants.

Indoors in dry, warm, winter air, they are very prone to spider mites, especially if the soil is allowed to get too dry.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Houseplants Cactus and Succulents Annuals
Foliage Fan Birds Critters Allowed Hummingbirder Butterflies Bee Lover
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Hamwild
Jan 23, 2018 3:28 PM CST
WillC said:As indoor potted plants, Asparagus Ferns do best in a moderately sunny window. Water it thoroughly as soon as the soil surface feels almost dry. They have large tuberous roots that use lots of water and grow rapidly. It will need to be repotted more frequently than most other indoor plants.

Indoors in dry, warm, winter air, they are very prone to spider mites, especially if the soil is allowed to get too dry.


Will, may I ask where spider mites come from? As in, do they have to be introduced or do they just appear somehow?
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Jan 23, 2018 5:55 PM CST
In many instances, the spider mites are on the plant in very small numbers when you purchase the plant - too few to notice. In the right conditions - hot, dry air or the plant under stress due to improper light or water - the mites will start to reproduce very rapidly and seemingly appear out of nowhere. Of course, they can also be introduced from other plants or even your hands or clothing, but in my experience, they are much more often there from the outset.

One of the best ways to prevent plant pests is to keep them healthy and stress-free by providing proper light and water.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Houseplants Cactus and Succulents Annuals
Foliage Fan Birds Critters Allowed Hummingbirder Butterflies Bee Lover
Image
Hamwild
Jan 23, 2018 6:11 PM CST
Sighing! I have an Aralia that seemingly out of nowhere developed them. I've had it since last Summer and it's been inside since Octoberish. I don't see any on anyone else. So frustrating.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Jan 23, 2018 6:42 PM CST
Once the mites take hold they can be difficult to eradicate. The key to treating them is not so much WHAT you use, but HOW THOROUGH you are. Plain soap and water can be very effective. However, you must spray all leaf and stem surfaces until they are all dripping wet. Very messy, but essential to be effective. If you are not thorough, you will miss some and they will reproduce rapidly.

Make sure your Aralia is not getting too dry.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Houseplants Cactus and Succulents Annuals
Foliage Fan Birds Critters Allowed Hummingbirder Butterflies Bee Lover
Image
Hamwild
Jan 23, 2018 7:28 PM CST
Sorry to the OP, I think I hijakced your post.

Will,
Is halfway down too dry? It's in a 4 inch pot. It's never wilted, so I don't let it get that dry.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Jan 23, 2018 8:03 PM CST
If your Aralia is in a small 4-inch pot, it will need water as soon as the surface of the soil feels dry. Sounds like you are definitely underwatering. Small pots dry out much sooner than larger pots, so overwatering is much less of a concern. It should never reach the wilt point.

If you find it needs to be watered several times a week, then it may be time to move it into a 6-inch pot.

Correct the watering problem and you will also help keep the spider mites in abeyance.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Houseplants Cactus and Succulents Annuals
Foliage Fan Birds Critters Allowed Hummingbirder Butterflies Bee Lover
Image
Hamwild
Jan 23, 2018 8:08 PM CST
Thank You!

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