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Name: Katie
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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kushka
Jan 21, 2018 1:18 PM CST
Hi, first post here. I've had this haworthia in this container for 3 years now and I'm about to repot and remove the pups. I'm actually surprised it's done this well considering there's no drainage, but I planned accordingly and layered activated charcoal in the bottom with a layer of river rocks, moss, & soil. Anyway, it's gotten pretty tall and I've had to stake it. Can I just chop it in half to contain it? It's kind of an odd situation because there is no great place to do it. Help!! Also, can anyone help identify the exact type of haworthia? I like to know these things. Smiling TIA!
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Name: Frenchy
Falls Church, VA (Zone 7b)
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Frenchy21
Jan 21, 2018 1:23 PM CST
Welcome @kushka! That's a very pretty haworthia but someone else will have to help ID it. Smiling
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
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porkpal
Jan 21, 2018 3:03 PM CST
I think it is lovely just as is - except that you are right about the container being inappropriate, and the "drainage" amendments actually make it worse.
Porkpal
Name: Katie
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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kushka
Jan 21, 2018 4:08 PM CST
@Frenchy21 Thanks!
@porkpal I don't know about worse- it's been quite happy for the time it's been in there, but it will be moving out shortly. I just need some direction from the forum on chopping off the top. It's become too tall and cannot remain as is without being staked.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jan 21, 2018 4:18 PM CST
I suspect that particular Haworthia wants to be a hanging plant. It looks a lot like mine before I gave it a haircut and planted 2 new pots (a couple years ago). Mine came with the common name "Zebra Cactus" - I haven't worked out what it might be but the plant commonly associated with that name is Haworthia attenuata.

Its really amazing to me you have kept it alive and happy in a closed container.
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Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Katie
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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kushka
Jan 21, 2018 5:21 PM CST
@daisyl Oh. My. Goodness. I can't believe how full & bushy those are!! Are those all individual "pups" from one main parent plant?? And I can't believe I kept it alive in that container too. It was an experiment that paid off I guess. I'm sure it would've had more growth than it did over 3 years but at least it didn't die! 😜
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Jan 21, 2018 5:39 PM CST

Moderator

Given enough time and space, your Haworthia will grow a stem long enough that it falls over and starts growing sideways. The offsets will do the same. If you want to keep one plant long-term then you can use a wider and wider pot as the clump grows out. Avoid a deep pot, make sure it has holes, use soil with about half rock (perlite, pumice, etc.), and make the jumps in container size small and intermittent, and the plant can have a long and prosperous life.

With my own plant I use a different strategy. Whenever a stem gets long, I cut it off near the base and let the other offsets fill in. With the cuttings I start new plants to pass on to others. The show goes on indefinitely without the plant overgrowing its pot or needing much attention beyond an occasional visit with the nail scissors. If you do choose to reduce the size of your plant, I would recommend cutting the main stem back instead of trying to separate the offsets.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Jan 21, 2018 5:41 PM (+)]
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Name: Katie
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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kushka
Jan 21, 2018 6:05 PM CST
@Baja_Costero Thanks so much, that's really helpful! I think I will go with your suggestion. Once I cut the main stem off, I'm assuming I should just let it callus over as normal and then plant? Or should I wait for roots to appear first?
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Bromeliad
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Baja_Costero
Jan 21, 2018 6:20 PM CST

Moderator

Cut with a reasonably sharp blade or scissors, and remove any leaves from the bottom of the cutting if they let go easily. The leaves that are firmly attached should stay, and usually there's about half an inch of stem visible at the bottom when you're all done. I like to make the cut just above soil level so there is only a bit of stem left at the bottom, and that will then remain above soil level and heal well.

Wait a week or more and then plant the cutting with just that little bit of stem buried in the soil (no buried leaves). You might need to put a rock on either side of the cutting to keep it upright. Then water when the soil goes dry. You will see the cutting sit there doing nothing for a while and then when it has good roots it will start growing again. Try to use potting soil for cacti (special formulation with enhanced drainage) or you can just amend regular potting soil with fine gravel (pumice, perlite, or equivalent) to about 50/50.

I would take this opportunity to move the mother plant to a pot with holes at the bottom at the same time. You can wait until spring if you want to. But to join the chorus, it's kind of amazing your plant is doing so well in its current pot. Without an exit for the water, two things happen. First, the water tends to accumulate inside if you're not super careful about when you water, leading to rot. Second, the salt in the water tends to accumulate inside if there is no regular flushing mechanism like there would be in a pot with holes at the bottom.

Your plant (and the cutting you may start) will have much longer and healthier lives in regular pots (or improvised pots from reused containers, if you prefer) with holes at the bottom. Ideally wider than tall, and not a whole lot bigger than the current setup. If/when you do repot your Haworthia, do not water for at least a week afterwards.

Also, the more light you can provide these plants indoors, the better. Especially this time of year. Like right by your sunniest south-facing window.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Jan 21, 2018 6:29 PM (+)]
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Name: Katie
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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kushka
Jan 21, 2018 7:05 PM CST
@Baja_Costero It's the only time I've ever had a succulent survive without drainage, but I was indeed very careful about when I watered it. I suspect it also helped that it was clear glass and I was able to see where the water went and if it pooled. I know it should have been repotted into a container with holes long before now but time got away from me on this one! Have no fear though, consider the experiment over and I will definitely be putting the mother plant & the new cutting in appropriate pots moving forward. Thanks again for all your help on this one!
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
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pod
Jan 21, 2018 7:58 PM CST
Very pretty Haworthia. I go a different direction and let mine flop and sprawl at will. The container fills in and makes an interesting display.
I believe yours might be Haworthia Coarctata v. Adelaidensis https://www.out-of-africa-plan... or related.

The color of the Haworthia changes with lighting. The plant does normally sprawl with growth. I will second Bajas' advice on the container shape/size and soil. Good luck with your pretty plant.
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jan 21, 2018 8:59 PM CST
Here is mine before its "haircut". I only trimmed it because It got left outside during our move to Reno and looked pretty bad so this is also pre-neglect.
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Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Katie
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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kushka
Jan 21, 2018 9:37 PM CST
Haha, that thing is crazy!! I just can't get over the growth. @daisyl

DaisyI said:Here is mine before its "haircut". I only trimmed it because It got left outside during our move to Reno and looked pretty bad so this is also pre-neglect.
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Bromeliad
Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator
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Baja_Costero
Jan 22, 2018 10:24 AM CST

Moderator

Another picture here to add to the variety of forms. The is the plant (6-8" pot) that I reduce by periodic pruning (at this point I take 3 stems at a time).

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Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
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pod
Jan 22, 2018 8:23 PM CST
That is a pretty display Baja!

I took a couple of photos today to illustrate the size of the pot as Baja recommended above. More wide than tall. I find a shallow container suits the Haworthia well. These containers are shallow pottery bowls with a drain hole drilled in them (by me). These bowls are 3 inches tall and 7 inches across.



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This clump will help support itself but when allowed to grow longer, it will drape over the edge of the container.
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This one is in dire need of repotting.
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It is in a taller narrow pot.


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A project for this coming spring.

Good luck with your Haworthia project Katie. Please do keep us posted.
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Katie
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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kushka
Jan 30, 2018 7:28 AM CST
@pod The color is really interesting on that 3rd photo! And I will do an update for sure!

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