Plant ID forum: What is growing in these woods?

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New Jersey
Superfly
Jan 26, 2018 5:30 PM CST
Hello friends. I have a wooded lot and would greatly appreciate help identifying some of the species growing back there. I am actually looking to put in a raised bed for a vegetable garden...and I've identified a few sunny spots, but before I clear the way, I want to make sure I'm not removing anything worth keeping. Please note, I am a beginner and don't know much.

This picture I took in the summer, and it seems to show two plants. The one on the left with the berries, I am guessing they are choke berries but I have no idea. The long one on the right is green and thorny and growing all over the place like an invasive vine. Now in winter, it has turned purple/maroon but with just as many thorns. Anyone know what it is? And should I remove it? Thank you so much for any help.

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Name: Jai or Jack
WV (Zone 6b)
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Jai_Ganesha
Jan 26, 2018 5:36 PM CST
Those aren't thorns, they're prickles. It is something from the genus Rubus, likely a raspberry of some sort.
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Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
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wildflowers
Jan 26, 2018 5:50 PM CST
Hi Superfly,

Yes, you have two plants there, the berries look like poke berries Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana)

The hairy thorny stem looks like some kind of berry, I don't know what grows in your area.
May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

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plantladylin
Jan 26, 2018 5:50 PM CST
The one with the berries may be Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana)
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Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
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plantladylin
Jan 26, 2018 5:51 PM CST
Green Grin! Cross posted with Wildflowers/Christine!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


New Jersey
Superfly
Jan 26, 2018 6:01 PM CST
Thank you so much. Yes, looking at other pictures of pokeberry that seems to be exactly what I have there. Great job! As for the prickly one, I'm still not sure. It did not have berries growing from it . It grows tall and then leans to the side creating an arch. Here are some pictures I took a few days ago in winter. You can see it turned purple in the cold. It is growing all over the place and is quite a nuisance as it is hard to navigate around, and seems to be attacking other plants. I will try to get a better pictures of it.

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[Last edited by Superfly - Jan 26, 2018 6:03 PM (+)]
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Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Jan 26, 2018 7:04 PM CST
If it were my land I would dig up both of those plants.

The Pokeberry may have a rather large root so be prepared to dig for a while.

The Rubus ?, no ID on that, if you want to keep it for a while, just relocate it to an area away from your raised beds, then keep watching it to see if it produces something worth keeping. It might be a Dewberry...or maybe something else. Later, if you decide you want to grow blackberries or raspberries, there are some very nice thornless varieties. (Just my suggestion after having been trapped by extremely thorny berry patches. *Blush* )

Good luck with the raised beds! Crossing Fingers! Thumbs up
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Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
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porkpal
Jan 26, 2018 7:48 PM CST
I agree with greene. I would remove any of the prickly brambles that are in your way; perhaps just save one located more conveniently just to see what it turns out to be.



Porkpal
Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
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wildflowers
Jan 27, 2018 7:18 AM CST
It does remind me of dewberry the way the stems grow arched with hairy red stems. Dewberry (Rubus trivialis)

According the the USDA, it does grow all up the east coast.
https://plants.usda.gov/core/p...

There is a Northern Dewberry but many of the pictures I found online show it more creeping than arching.

https://plants.usda.gov/core/p...
https://gobotany.newenglandwil...
http://travelswithmusti.net.s1...
May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

New Jersey
Superfly
Jan 27, 2018 10:04 AM CST
Thank you. You guys are brilliant. Here are a few more photos of the prickly one. I'm still not sure..because as I recall, there were no berries on it in summer. It was just green in the spring/summer and maroonish-purple in the winter. It's been prickly and invasive throughout. You can see in these photos what I meant about the arch.


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Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Jan 27, 2018 10:08 AM CST
It does look like Dewberry to me. Whatever it is, you are almost certainly going to have to thin it out if you want to have any use of that property.
Porkpal
Name: Jai or Jack
WV (Zone 6b)
Om shanti om.
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Jai_Ganesha
Jan 27, 2018 11:40 AM CST
Dewberries are dioecious. That's probably why you haven't seen fruit.
Keep going!
New Jersey
Superfly
Jan 30, 2018 12:41 PM CST
Thank you guys again. Those links you gave were very helpful wildflower thank you. I'm sure you're right about it being Dewberry and I'm going to keep an eye on them this summer to find that fruit. I will thin it in the areas I plan to garden. Thanks again.
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Jan 30, 2018 5:40 PM CST
Looks like a raspberry to me...
http://identifythatplant.com/b...

Personally, I'd keep both...

While we can't eat the poke berries, there's no reason to deprive the songbirds...

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