Texas Gardening forum: Edible wild plants

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Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Jan 27, 2018 8:15 AM CST
Edited to add that this is specific to Texas plants.

This website may have been posted before. A fellow sent me the link to browse and it contains interesting stuff. Would be especially useful if I were starving. I frequently think I am, but my waist says otherwise. Here's the link:

http://www.foragingtexas.com

Who would have ever thought Lantana berries could be eaten?!! Described as a starvation food source, but still...... Sticking tongue out
Donald
[Last edited by needrain - Jan 27, 2018 8:16 AM (+)]
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Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Jan 27, 2018 10:14 AM CST
I always thought Lantana was toxic - especially the berries.

In fact, looking at the list, I thought a lot of those plants were considered dangerous to eat!
Porkpal
[Last edited by porkpal - Jan 27, 2018 10:20 AM (+)]
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Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Jan 27, 2018 11:26 AM CST
porkpal said:I always thought Lantana was toxic - especially the berries.

In fact, looking at the list, I thought a lot of those plants were considered dangerous to eat!


Lantana is toxic according to what is written on the site. The berries have to be cooked, I think.

True. A lot of the plants on the list can be toxic. Always makes me think of poke sallet or poke salad. Requires proper prep. I've eaten it when others prepared it, but don't particularly like it and am not motivated to attempt cooking it. I haven't gone through a lot of the list, but a couple of the mushroom entries were interesting because it shows some poisonous lookalikes to the edible varieties. For the puffballs, the timing has to be right in addition to it having some unpleasant mimics that may be mistaken for puffballs. You really need to know what you're seeing and what you're doing. What I always wonder is who were the people that experimented to learn the info concerning the different plants?

Trying to collect the fruit off of a pencil cholla or tasajillo cactus would have to qualify as a starvation food. I can't get near that stuff without getting those tiny little stickers in me. The clothing or gloves aren't made that can prevent, IMO. I hate that stuff when it grows up in a fence row and then you have to get in and repair the fence. Ugh. It is sort of fun to throw on a campfire, though. All those little segments explode and pop like mini firecrackers. Big Grin
Donald
[Last edited by needrain - Jan 27, 2018 11:27 AM (+)]
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Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Jan 27, 2018 12:04 PM CST
Have you noticed that barbed wire seems to attract barbed plants?
Porkpal
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Jan 27, 2018 12:20 PM CST
@porkpal
Well, yes. But I've noticed the old net wire also seems to attract anything with thorns. The problem is that in my part of the world the number of prickly plants is quite large. It just drives me crazy when we have visitors and they are wearing flip flops or sandals and are walking around in my yard. It especially drives me crazy when they have young children wearing those types of shoes and shorts. My yard is old pasture, not lush San Augustine. So they inevitably stump their toe on a young prickly pear or get onto a tuft of stinging nettle or snag a grassbur between a toe - not mention the harvester ants - that sort of thing. Or worse, they decide to take a stroll into the actual pasture where it's not ever mowed and wear shorts where every briar thorn can cut them and the needle grass and spear grass can stick them. It's pasture land, not a park with hiking trails D'Oh! . I get blamed, but I refuse to accept responsibility for wicked vegetation. They do get warned.
Donald
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Jan 27, 2018 2:42 PM CST
My "lawn" is not much better, and I never venture into the pastures in less than jeans and boots. Around here there seem to be people who don't own any foot wear except flip flops!
Porkpal
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Jan 27, 2018 3:01 PM CST
@porkpal

Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing
Donald
North Central TX (Zone 8a)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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tx_flower_child
Feb 13, 2018 9:59 PM CST
I just read this and I question some of the entries. One plant that really struck me was Nandina. Aside from the fact that it's invasive, the pretty berries contain cyanide. I only know this because I recently read that cedar waxwings were found dead outside a local high school. Autopsy showed that the cause of death was cyanide from the berries of Nandina aka Heavenly Bamboo. A quick google search showed that it's also toxic to dogs, cats, cattle, etc.

But wait! The author notes that raw berries can be made into jelly and then says, 'The pulp of Nanadina berries is edible but not overly flavorful. The seeds contain cyanide compounds and must be removed.' Great. Have you ever seen how small the berries are? It would take a lot of hours to get enough pulp to make jelly.

I have a wonderfully fun (and wicked) book by Amy Stewart that's very entertaining. Title is 'Wicked Plants - The Weed That Killed Lincoln's Mother & Other Botanical Atrocities'.

Just curious, Donald. Why are so many almost nekkid people running around your property?
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Feb 13, 2018 10:22 PM CST
Equally amusing is her book, "Wicked Bugs". They both contain useful information along with entertainment.
Porkpal
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Feb 14, 2018 9:01 AM CST
tx_flower_child said:

Just curious, Donald. Why are so many almost nekkid people running around your property?


Not nekkid. That would probably be a cure nodding . Just wearing their city clothes consisting of shorts and flip flops or sandals. That attire works for sidewalks and hike & bike trails which are maintained regularly. Not so well once you venture off into uncivilized territory. Those little prickly pear babies that are as small as pencil erasures are nearly impossible to spot even when you are carrying around a bucket looking specifically for them. I usually gather the equivalent of a 50 lb feed sack full every growing season. That's in my so called 'yard' around the house. The high cost of water and, in recent years the use restrictions on the water, would make maintaining a lush lawn impractical even if I were inclined toward one. I prefer enjoying those lawns where someone else is putting in the time and work and frustration they involve.

Nekkid, though. I think the mosquitoes would enjoy that. A feast! I live in the country by a river bottom. I'm fortunate that mosquitoes don't particularly love me. All I need to avoid them is another body to go with me on a walk and I'm good. If I'm the only thing on the plate, then they eat to live.
Donald
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Feb 14, 2018 9:06 AM CST
I too have found that city folks seem tastier to "my" mosquitoes; I wonder what the difference is. More easily pierced skin?
Porkpal
North Central TX (Zone 8a)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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tx_flower_child
Feb 14, 2018 2:08 PM CST
Mosquitoes love me. Always have. Garlic helps fend them off but also fends off friends.

Glad someone else has read Amy Stewart. I think she's also written about growing herbs for making unusual cocktails and such. Or maybe that was someone else.

Donald, what I really meant was whether you invite people onto your property or they just decide to stop and enjoy nature. Half nekkidly.
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Feb 14, 2018 4:56 PM CST
@tx_flower_child they are invited or simply allowed, I guess. It refers to friends and family who visit. Might be for an afternoon, a day or overnight with several days. Most all of them live in cities, but some of those family members seem to have forgotten what grows and lives out in the boonies.
Donald
Name: Kat
Magnolia, Tx (Zone 8b)
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kittriana
Feb 15, 2018 8:00 PM CST
Funny, there might be an abundance of wild edibles IF you know proper preparations, but I guarantee there is a REASON our vegetables are better than those wild edibles, 😂, I know Montana broads who thot I was lookin for Snakes in my sandals, but I told em I live in South Texas and we have more snakes that are poisonous than they do, And I know all of them and they stink. Creosote bushes, mesquite, goatheads, sandburs, cholla, ocotillo, prickly pears, yucca- I know better than to hit the desert without my boots, so since I can't wear em now, I don't go there. Texas and Az both have more things to hurt you than nice things, chuckl. Get em!
kitt
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
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pod
Feb 15, 2018 9:27 PM CST
In the early days, I learned to ride a dirt bike in the Arizona desert. It required full gear due to the unsocial terrain. Thorns, rocks, stickers, snakes.

We moved to east Texas and had a large lush green pasture. I couldn't resist temptation getting on the dirt bike in shorts and sandals.

That enjoyment was short lived. I was quickly introduced to fire ants and bull nettles. So I have been chuckling while reading this thread. Thanks all....
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
[Last edited by pod - Feb 15, 2018 10:05 PM (+)]
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Name: Kat
Magnolia, Tx (Zone 8b)
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kittriana
Feb 16, 2018 9:45 AM CST
My life was fun. Started near Nida, Okla near the 13 mile prairie ( not there, but Durant is closest) then moved to NMex- Artesia, Loco Hills, Belen. Then back to Okla a few years near the Muddy Boggy river. Then Texas. Mama loved her cactus and I learned hard core crittur id and safety in lightning storms since I was a roaming wayward child that loved to prowl the scrub. My paternal grandfather taught me the fields and plants of Okla, and my uncle taught me my dairy skills. Dad taught me machines and by 10 yrs old I would drive anything but a car. (Thought they were tame). My walking and hiking added a horse I took literally everywwhere, and the barbwire gates were changed so I could close them behind me, chuckl. Bullnettles were where we kids would chunk the loser in our games, but cocklburs were what a long horse tail would swat you with if you annoyed them. I think you are brave with the dirt bike, but slower is more fun Sticking tongue out
Thumb of 2018-02-16/kittriana/2344ec

And all that was meant to say learning what is edible wild allowed me a lot of snacks along the way. Or a reminder to pack a pocket knife
kitt
[Last edited by kittriana - Feb 16, 2018 9:48 AM (+)]
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Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Feb 16, 2018 1:06 PM CST
The fellow who is author of the blog and book referenced is named Mark 'Merriwether' Vorderbruggen. I watched a YouTube video of him conducting a tour showing people how to identify plants. I believe he lives in the Houston area and conducts tours occasionally. There seem to be several videos on YouTube.

I don't know how current the info is, but it seems his real job has been as a research chemist with the oil industry Blinking . Apparently he has a PhD.

I'm gonna have to ask the fellow that told me about the blog if he has used any of the info to forage around here. Doesn't seem very likely. The only foraging here I've ever participated in was helping a nephew gather ripe prickly pear tunas. He had a recipe to make mead using them. My ultimate reward for helping was a partial bottle of the mead. Wasn't bad.
Donald
Name: Alice
Fort Worth (Zone 8a)
Gypsi
Feb 23, 2018 4:58 PM CST
There aren't too many foraging plants worth eating around me. (yeah I know I showed up. What a week of rain and dropping off FB will do to me.)

Gypsi

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