Trees and Shrubs forum: What are the Best trees for honeybees zone 6b Tennessee

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Name: Phillip
brayton tn. (Zone 6b)
Region: United States of America Canning and food preservation Garden Ideas: Level 1
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homeshow
Jan 27, 2018 8:42 AM CST
Looking for trees that produce nectar and pollen. If it's fruits and nuts preferably the kind that can be eaten and used by people. I'm looking to maximize the pollen the nectar season by using a variety of trees that flower and fruit early as well as late. 6 1/2 acre area.

all the Agricultural Extension agent wanted to talk about was apples.
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Jan 27, 2018 11:02 AM CST
It depends on what fruits you want to eat I guess. Apples are the obvious choice but would you eat crabapples or dogwood fruits? What about plums? Peaches and pears are more work but there might be some varieties suited to your area. You might try going online to your ag extension and see what other fruits they recommend for your area. They might even recommend specific varieties.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: Phillip
brayton tn. (Zone 6b)
Region: United States of America Canning and food preservation Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
homeshow
Jan 27, 2018 1:04 PM CST
Cindy please read entire post. All the Ag.agent wants to talk about is apples.
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Jan 27, 2018 4:11 PM CST
From your post, I assumed you talked to an ag extension agent and didn't search online.
https://extension.tennessee.ed...
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
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ViburnumValley
Jan 27, 2018 8:48 PM CST
In Tennessee, you could grow all the plants in Rosaceace that are fruit producing - apples, crabapples, peaches, plums, pears, serviceberries, roses, etc.

In addition, you should consider Blackgum (Nyssa sp.), Basswood/Linden (Tilia sp.), as well as Sassafras and Tetradium. I would suggest you plant shrubby species that attract bees throughout the growing season as well, whether you expect to consume the fruit or not. This would include Cornus sp. (Dogwood), Viburnum sp., Sambucus sp. (Elderberry), and every one of the Holly species (Ilex sp.).

All the nut tree species are wind-pollinated - no bees necessary or involved.
John
Name: Phillip
brayton tn. (Zone 6b)
Region: United States of America Canning and food preservation Garden Ideas: Level 1
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homeshow
Feb 3, 2018 9:54 AM CST
Great stuff thanks John.
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
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ViburnumValley
Feb 4, 2018 1:31 PM CST
You are certainly welcome. You may also considering including around/about your property plenty of herbaceous species to provide food sources for insect friends when your woody plants are out of flower - which is a pretty big part of the year.

John
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Feb 4, 2018 4:41 PM CST
Thumb of 2018-02-04/RpR/feefc5
Why do you want to put them in a tree?
Name: Phillip
brayton tn. (Zone 6b)
Region: United States of America Canning and food preservation Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
homeshow
Feb 5, 2018 11:13 AM CST
ViburnumValley said:You are certainly welcome. You may also considering including around/about your property plenty of herbaceous species to provide food sources for insect friends when your woody plants are out of flower - which is a pretty big part of the year.



I'm thinking about planting buckwheat and sunflowers

Name: Mary
Lake Stevens, WA (Zone 8a)
Near Seattle
Bookworm Garden Photography Plant and/or Seed Trader Plays in the sandbox Region: Pacific Northwest Seed Starter
Winter Sowing
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Pistil
Feb 5, 2018 12:51 PM CST
How about adding some Sourwood to your list? They make choice honey, and they flower late in the year thus providing food at a different time than the usual spring flowerers. Also the foliage is spectacular in the fall. No edible parts for people though. I did read that the leaves an be used as animal forage. They are native in much of Tennessee. I don't know if you will find many for sale at nurseries, but they are easy from seed.
Name: Phillip
brayton tn. (Zone 6b)
Region: United States of America Canning and food preservation Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
homeshow
Feb 10, 2018 9:50 AM CST
Good idea Mary. Sourwood honey is very popular around here.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Feb 28, 2018 11:43 AM CST
Various species of Viburnum should fit your parameter if you do not mind ones that are more a bush than a tree though with trimming Viburnum can be made into small trees.
Again memebers of the Rubus family are very, very much liked by Bumble Bees.
[Last edited by RpR - Feb 28, 2018 11:45 AM (+)]
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