Plant ID forum: What is this this West Texas Bulb?

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Mentone, TX
RWP3
Jan 28, 2018 12:23 PM CST
I am working in the West Texas desert and we have been clearing some land. I noticed these bulbs lying on the ground and am curious as to what they are. They are the size of a small avocado pit, have an inside layered like an onion (but no onion odor or taste). I am wondering what they are and are they edible? I had no luck trying to find an answer on google.
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North Central TX (Zone 8a)
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tx_flower_child
Jan 28, 2018 12:39 PM CST
They were just laying there on the ground? Not sprouting up?

Hope someone can answer because I'd like to know!
North Central TX (Zone 8a)
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tx_flower_child
Jan 28, 2018 12:52 PM CST
Did it look like a critter dug them up and then maybe went 'blah'?
Name: Lin
Southeast Florida (Zone 10a)

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plantladylin
Jan 28, 2018 2:10 PM CST
My first thought was wild onion (Allium sp.) : http://www.texasbeyondhistory....

edited to add links to plants in our database:
Drummond's onion (Allium drummondii)
Wild Onion (Allium canadense)

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[Last edited by plantladylin - Jan 28, 2018 2:12 PM (+)]
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Name: Tofi
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tofitropic
Jan 28, 2018 7:16 PM CST
Could be, Zephyrantes (or some type of rain lily bulb). you can grow some to see the bloom for a precise ID
Name: Lin
Southeast Florida (Zone 10a)

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plantladylin
Jan 28, 2018 7:46 PM CST
Yes, another possibility is Rain Lilies (Zephyranthes)
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Name: Karen
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plantmanager
Jan 28, 2018 8:35 PM CST
I'm not sure rain lilies would grow wild there unless you're clearing an old homestead where they might have been planted.
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Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jan 28, 2018 8:57 PM CST
Maybe Soaproot?
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Mentone, TX
RWP3
Jan 29, 2018 8:37 PM CST
tx_flower_child said:They were just laying there on the ground? Not sprouting up?

Hope someone can answer because I'd like to know!
We had cleared this area of vegetation. I'm guessing we uprooted them. This country is super arid, yet these were like an onion, full of moisture,

Mentone, TX
RWP3
Jan 29, 2018 8:41 PM CST
plantladylin said:Yes, another possibility is Rain Lilies (Zephyranthes)
I think you nailed it, looks right....edible or poisonous?

Name: Lin
Southeast Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Jan 30, 2018 10:23 AM CST
I think Rain Lilies (both Zephyranthes and Hebranthus) contain toxins so it would not be wise to taste them.
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North Central TX (Zone 8a)
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tx_flower_child
Jan 31, 2018 1:24 AM CST
My first reaction, other than taking you literally, was that they looked like some type of rain lily. Doesn't make too much sense, tho. Wouldn't expect them to survive an arid climate, let alone hold moisture for who knows how many years. Although. maybe the sand acted like a preservative. (Sorry. Thinking out loud. Bad habit.)

I'm trying to remember the name of some bulbs gifted to me about a year ago. I recently found them in the paper bags that I brought them home in. (oops) I'll look at my notes later and see what my bulbs are. They certainly have survived living in a brown paper lunch sack for at least a year, maybe 2. Guess they'd do even better if I plant them.

So is there some quality of a desert environment that could act as a preservative?

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