All Things Gardening forum: Compost Problem

Views: 268, Replies: 5 » Jump to the end

dvc15
Jan 29, 2018 2:38 AM CST
Hello everyone!

I have created a compost by cutting the top and bottom part of a water tank.

I have put it on the ground in the backyard where there is grass, and have been adding;
- dog poop
- mowed grass & other green waste
- leftover food

Someone told me that it's possible to clean up the parasites from the dog poop by composting it. Is this actually possible? Somewhere else I've read that you don't want dog poop in the compost because it can contaminate the yard. I'm looking to create the healthiest yard possible and eliminate as many parasites from the garden as possible (as I have 5 dogs all who poop in the yard).

Also, the compost doesn't seem to be going down into the ground. What could I do to fix this issue?

I'm hoping for some help please!

Thank's!

Daniel. Smiling
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
My dogs love me; some people don't.
Deer Bookworm Keeper of Poultry Vermiculture Garden Ideas: Master Level Region: Georgia
Plant Identifier Rabbit Keeper Composter Garden Sages Native Plants and Wildflowers Herbs
Image
greene
Jan 29, 2018 8:25 AM CST
I waited a while to see if someone else would answer.

There are three things here.

One - compost pile/bin/container for the vegetative matter the end product to be used in the garden including your edible plants. (No dog poop allowed; also no meat, fat, and certain other things I can't remember. *Blush* ) Oh, I forgot to say...it's okay to pee on the compost once in a while. Rolling on the floor laughing

Two - dog poop composter. That is similar to regular compost but it must be controlled to keep the heat elevated high enough to kill the pathogens. Most folks attempting to make compost don't keep close watch on the temperature but that is up to the individual. The end product is said to be safe to use in the garden but many folks avoid using it on edibles. I am not including any links because what I am seeing on the internet looks like something a small child could fall into and never be seen again; very scary.)

Three - dog poop digester. That works similar to a septic tank. Dig a hole, a purchased tank with lid (too small for a child to fall into Thumbs up ); add dog poop, add some digester to start the action, add some water occasionally ( Shrug! I think, but do your own research), and the liquid portion of the poop will seep into the ground and the solids remain, hopefully minus any pathogens. Crossing Fingers!
Here is one example of the dog septic system:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

One thing I'd like to ask. What do you mean exactly when you say 'leftover food'? I sould suggest to only add the cuttings, peelings, seeds, etc. from fresh fruits and vegetables to compost (for edible gardens); never add too much citrus at one time because it makes the earthworms unhappy. Layer the compost and turn it often which I think may not be possible in your water tank. Also, you water tank system may not allow enough air; compost needs air to work properly. Without sufficient air, your compost will stand a good chance of becoming anaerobic slime and stink. Sad

Here is one man's method of getting rid of dog poop:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

Hope some of this is helpful.

Edited to add:
I live in southeast Georgia and we have colonies of Dung Beetles. During the warm weather, I stick a terra cotta flower pot over some of the poop piles and let the beetles enjoy free food to raise their young. They get rid of poop in about 3-4 days and the pot keeps the flies off the poop.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
[Last edited by greene - Jan 29, 2018 8:29 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1630557 (2)
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Jan 29, 2018 8:35 PM CST
That could be a pretty deadly compost pile you created. Fresh manure can carry E. Coli and Salmonella. The problem is that the heat required to kill those pathogens will also kill the "good bugs". And, the first "bug" to grow back will be salmonella.

Your compost pile should contain only veggies and well rotted manure.

Also, the compost won't leach out the bottom of your bin. You have to remove it and use it. The entire process takes about a year (in my experience).
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Jan 30, 2018 11:36 AM CST
I add cat poop to my compost heap every now and then along with chem free litter.
The pathogen paranoid that, not people here, I have read over the year seems to imply that people will roll in their compost heap like dogs do in poop.
I rarely turn my compost heaps and let them settle, usually emptying every three to four years.
I also put quite sloppy manure in the garden and roto-till it in barefoot.
I have had no health problems, although since my right foot rotted off I limp a bit.

Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Plant Identifier Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
stone
Jan 30, 2018 5:17 PM CST
greene said:
I live in southeast Georgia and we have colonies of Dung Beetles. During the warm weather, I stick a terra cotta flower pot over some of the poop piles and let the beetles enjoy free food to raise their young. They get rid of poop in about 3-4 days and the pot keeps the flies off the poop.


I enjoy seeing those beetles... They seem to cart all the poop away before the temps warm up enough for the flies to be a problem... Think I'd bury it before searching out a terra cotta pot...

As far as what to compost?
The florida-survival-gardener says to compost everything, even a rat:
http://www.thesurvivalgardener...

Personally... Adding dog poop to the compost? sounds pretty yucky... Doesn't mean that I wouldn't bury it in the soil under the compost pile...

Any plant material is fair game for the compost... leftover meals go to the cats... They also get dibs on the vegetable scraps...

Re: compost going into the soil....

I think you'll have better luck using the open pile method.
By piling the material in an open pile... it works on the soil under the pile... at my house... I pile it in a likely spot in the garden... after it's composted, and I've started another pile... I'll level out the compost pile... leaving it several inches deep... saves on spreading 'weed' seeds... spreading the compost around the entire garden also spreads the seeds of everything added to the pile... I'd rather not....
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Jan 30, 2018 6:44 PM CST
Stone's open pile method is the way I did it too. But its probably not a good option for someone with a small yard (like me now).
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« All Things Gardening forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by ge1836 and is called "Penstemon Dark Towers blooms"