Ask a Question forum: Is this fellow OK?

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Swarthmore, PA
jde68
Jan 30, 2018 8:38 PM CST
I believe this is a peace lilly...I am concerned about the brown dried fronds (?) in the center as well as the yellowing...I am new to owning house plants and I got this plant plus a few others from a woman who was moving...any ideas if this plant is ok or what I can do to get it healthier? Thanks
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Name: Christine
Saugerties, NY zone 5a
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Christine
Jan 31, 2018 7:36 AM CST
The first thing I would do is carefully remove all the dead stems and any other dead stuff on the top of the soil, your PL will look and feel a lot better, then in the late spring I would re-pot with a good potting soil and perlite. Peace Lily's dont like soggy roots nor do they like to go completely dry. Other members will have more advice for you Smiling

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Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Jan 31, 2018 9:49 AM CST
A good tool to get into the tight spots to cut away the dead stuff without accidentally cutting the healthy stems is a pair of nail trimmers they use for trimming a cat's claws.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Swarthmore, PA
jde68
Jan 31, 2018 12:09 PM CST
Christine said:The first thing I would do is carefully remove all the dead stems and any other dead stuff on the top of the soil, your PL will look and feel a lot better, then in the late spring I would re-pot with a good potting soil and perlite. Peace Lily's dont like soggy roots nor do they like to go completely dry. Other members will have more advice for you Smiling

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Thank you...any idea why this might be happening?
Swarthmore, PA
jde68
Jan 31, 2018 12:09 PM CST
greene said:A good tool to get into the tight spots to cut away the dead stuff without accidentally cutting the healthy stems is a pair of nail trimmers they use for trimming a cat's claws.


That's a good suggestion thanks
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Jan 31, 2018 3:33 PM CST
The loss of many leaves is due to it getting too dry too many times before you got it. While Peace Lilies do perk back up after they wilt from too little watering, they also lose some leaves each time that happens. So you know what to avoid going forward.

Clean it up as others have suggested so that it looks better. No need to repot or change the soil. Keep it in a very bright location but protected from direct rays of the sun, such as right in front of a north window. Water it thoroughly - until some water trickles through the drain hole - and then water it again just as or before the leaves start to wilt. Fertilize it monthly at half strength. I think you will be rewarded with lots of healthy new leaves and even flowers. :hurray:
It is a relatively fast grower so recovery should be pretty quick.
Will Creed
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Name: Sally
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sallyg
Feb 2, 2018 7:45 AM CST
my experience with peace lilies is that it is almost impossible to overwater them. and with a thick one like this, when you water, it may have been trickling around and leaking out, instead of soaking the middle of the roots.
Depending on your home heating, they can dry out very quickly. I had one at work, but had to bring it home because the dry heat and ventilation of the building was drying it faster than I could keep up.
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