Ask a Question forum: Can someone help me with my lily echeveria and succulent problems?

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San Marcos, Texas
newplantmama
Feb 1, 2018 4:45 PM CST
Hi! I am new to plant owning and caring for them, so I do not know much about how to care for them. I recently gifted an echieveria and a succulent and I'm worried about their health since they had go through a six hour car ride, so I could transfer them with me to my college. On my lily echieveria the leaves were damaged on the ride so some were broken and now they seem to be shriveling a bit. My succulent's bottom leaves seem to be yellowing and the soil dries very easily.I'm just asking for help on what to do since I know they are suffering and I feel terrible that they are. Thank you for any answer that you can give me!
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Feb 1, 2018 10:10 PM CST
Welcome!

The soil looks very wet and the pot is very large. It may be that you are overwatering and they aren't getting enough light. That is the most common problem experienced by new succulent owners. The over-watering/low light problem is compounded with a too large pot and inappropriate potting mix. Who potted them for you and how long have they been in those pots? You may have to do an emergency transplant to save their lives.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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San Marcos, Texas
newplantmama
Feb 1, 2018 10:23 PM CST
Thank you so much for taking time out of your day to answer this!
I believe just the store potted the first one and my friend did the second I believe.
Do you have any recommendations for a type of pot to plant them in and how to transplant them?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Feb 2, 2018 1:29 PM CST
Is the Echeveria planted in moss?

I think all three need a replant into smaller containers with grittier soil. Its a bad time of year to be messing with cactus and succulents but I'm not sure they will survive until spring.

The only other option is wait to transplant but water sparingly. Put your finger into the soil and don't water until it is dry an inch down. Provide them with as much light as you can.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Feb 2, 2018 1:46 PM CST
The first plant will need a larger pot, not a smaller one, but you really should wait until spring is well underway before making any changes. It will get larger. When in doubt keep it in a pot that is just wider than the rosette, but not much more than that. Too large a pot and the soil will stay wetter longer at the bottom (risk of rot if you don't correct the watering frequency). Too small a pot (smaller than the width of the rosette, in general) and the plant will be stunted, not reaching its potential size and fullness.

The second plant is an Aeonium (a relative of the Echeverias from the Canary Islands). The way you can tell is by the fine hairs on the margin of the leaves and the relatively long stem. It will likely branch in great profusion as it grows up, resulting in a bushy shape over time. Depending on the size of the roots, it is probably fine in that container for a while. Too small a pot and it will be stunted, dwarfed, and branch and flower less. Aeoniums have a reversed seasonal growth pattern, meaning they are most active in winter and least active in summer. They require lots of light indoors during the darkest time of year. They will look smaller and more closed up during late summer, but this is not a sign to water more, it's just their normal annual cycle. Because rain comes mostly in the winter in the Canary Islands.

When you consider repotting, the pot has to have holes at the bottom, and ideally be wider than deep. The soil should be fast draining (say 50% pumice, perlite or equivalent). Do not water after repotting until a week has passed (to avoid risk of rot).

The most important thing this time of year (assuming these are indoor plants) is to provide as much light as possible. Your plants should "see" the sun for hours a day. Which usually means they need to be perched right on a sunny windowsill. Low light will result in weaker plants and increase the risk of rot in response to excess water.

In general water well when the soil is going dry, not sooner. The soil at the top will dry out faster than the soil at depth, which is what matters. You can poke a moisture meter or your finger in there, or judge by the weight of the pot, whatever works. You will want to water less often in winter than in spring or summer, generally, since evaporation depends on temperature and light. With the passage of the seasons and careful observation you will get a much better sense of how this works.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Feb 2, 2018 2:05 PM (+)]
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San Marcos, Texas
newplantmama
Feb 2, 2018 2:00 PM CST
Thank you all so much! Y'alls responses were so helpful

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