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As a comment about Carolina Silverbell (Halesia carolina), ILPARW wrote:

The Carolina Silverbell has been assigned a newer official scientific name of (Halesia tetraptera) that means "four wings" in Greek, so (Halesia carolina) is the same species. This is very beautiful tree in every way. The native range goes from southern West Virginia & Ohio & Illinois down into northwest Florida into much of Alabama, and there is a spot on the southern Oklahoma/Arkansas border area, growing in upland forest. It has simple leaves about 2 to 5 inches long and about 1/2 as wide that turn a pale yellow in fall. The white, sometimes pale rose, flowers are 4-lobed, bell-shaped and hang down on pendulous stalks in April-May. It bears 4-winged dry brown drupes (or samaras) with 2 to 3 seeds inside. The bark starts out smooth and gray but eventually becomes gray & brown & black ridged & furrowed with scaly plates. It grows about 1 foot/year and lives over a hundred years. It has deep, coarse, wide-spreading roots that make it difficult to transplant, and is often best to buy in containers from larger, diverse or native plant or specialty nurseries. I've only seen this species planted in arboretums, estates, and professional landscapes; it is not common. It needs an acid, good quality sandy loam or silty or good clay soil, not for compacted soils of many new subdivisions. I think it can tolerate a pH up to about 7.0.
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses Clematis Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages Forum moderator Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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zuzu
Feb 1, 2018 5:12 PM CST

Plants Admin

If your first sentence is correct, you're ahead of the taxonomists. The Catalogue of Life, updated just two days ago, still shows H. carolina and H. tetraptera as two different species. I'll keep my eyes open for updates in their status.
Name: Rick Webb
southeast Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
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ILPARW
Feb 8, 2018 10:01 PM CST
OK. My source is my old woody plant teacher of Dr. Michael A. Dirr in his Manual of Woody Landscape Plants in the 1998 edition. on page 412 he shows Halesia tetraptera Ellis (formerly H. caroliniana, L.) There is also a H. monticola, the Mountain Silverbell, that is now treated as a variety of H. tetraptera by most authorities, page 415.
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses Clematis Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages Forum moderator Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
zuzu
Feb 9, 2018 1:06 AM CST

Plants Admin

Yes, Halesia monticola is now a synonym for H. tetraptera var. monticola and is noted as such in our database.

Mountain silverbell (Halesia tetraptera var. monticola)

Halesia tetraptera Ellis has no synonyms, however, and Halesia carolina L. is still an accepted name, so they are two different species. Halesia carolina var. monticola was reclassified as a synonym for Halesia tetraptera var. monticola, so maybe that's what's being referred to in your source.

Wait a minute! I suppose there could be another explanation. I just noticed that you refer to H. carolina in your plant comment:

"The Carolina Silverbell has been assigned a newer official scientific name of (Halesia tetraptera) that means "four wings" in Greek, so (Halesia carolina) is the same species."

And to H. caroliniana in your response:

"on page 412 he shows Halesia tetraptera Ellis (formerly H. caroliniana, L.)"

Was "caroliniana" a typo or is that the name your source actually uses? If it's not a typing error, is it possible that there once was a Halesia caroliniana species that was reclassified so long ago that it's no longer listed in the main taxonomic databases?
Name: Rick Webb
southeast Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
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ILPARW
Feb 10, 2018 1:18 PM CST
My mistake! H. carolina is correct. Sometimes I get mixed up on (carolina) vs (caroliniana) and this happens with "virginica & virginiana). It depends on the species where these adjectives vary. Dr. Dirr is good on botany, though he has a PHD in ornamental horticulture, and he says that most of the botanical sources he has looked at think that H. Carolina = H. tetraptera. There is disagreement among botanists about species. I myself am a "lupper" and not a "splitter" so I like them being the same, but it is up to you all.

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