Ask a Question forum: Soil Typing & PH Testing

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Atlanta, Ga, Chattahoochee woo
jeffthelimitcom
Feb 3, 2018 5:48 PM CST
I'm working on a project reclaiming woodlands from Japanese Privet. Some of this is floodplain and much appears to be alluvial in nature but there is some variety of terrain and soil.

It seems best to me to analyze the soil and terrain before figuring out what native plants to restore.

Here is what I'm considering. Running a mason jar test like this:
<link removed>

I'd also like to test the PH. Can I use a liquid PH meter to check the liquid in the jar? Distilled water?

I'd like to track soil moisture as well, there's monthly work days so these samples can be geo-marked and moisture tested monthly. I see this as just a general range item and perhaps a dedicated cheapy soil moisture meter kept clean?

I'm looking for tips on how to go about this and minimize the mistakes.
Name: Sue
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sooby
Feb 4, 2018 8:38 AM CST
The link to the mason jar method of determining soil texture was excluded from your post, I think that is because new members can't post links for about two weeks after joining (because of spammers). I assume you mean something like at the bottom of this page:

http://culter.colorado.edu/~ki...

You can get combined moisture and pH meters although they are not cheap. You would need to find out how accurate the cheap one/s you are thinking of getting are. I'm not sure that the extra amount of water in the mason jar would be the best thing to test. There are soil pH meters that test the pH directly in the soil (I have one that does soil moisture as well although I find it rather cumbersome to use).
Name: greene
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greene
Feb 4, 2018 9:00 AM CST
Contact the University of Georgia; they do soil testing.

Also, there have been surveys done. UGA can most likely direct you to the survey of the area where you are working.
Here is an example of the surveys.
https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Inte...

Seedlings can be purchased through Georgia Forestry; many species are already sold out but you can at least get an idea of the types of trees offered so you can plan ahead for next season.
http://www.gfc.state.ga.us/see...
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Atlanta, Ga, Chattahoochee woo
jeffthelimitcom
Feb 5, 2018 8:44 AM CST
sooby said:The link to the mason jar method of determining soil texture was excluded from your post, I think that is because new members can't post links for about two weeks after joining (because of spammers). I assume you mean something like at the bottom of this page:

<link removed>

You can get combined moisture and pH meters although they are not cheap. You would need to find out how accurate the cheap one/s you are thinking of getting are. I'm not sure that the extra amount of water in the mason jar would be the best thing to test. There are soil pH meters that test the pH directly in the soil (I have one that does soil moisture as well although I find it rather cumbersome to use).


Yes.

I've used cheap soil PH testers and have been unimpressed with them, which is why I thought there must be a better way. I'll look again at them.

There are three species under consideration that I have PH concerns over: blueberries, oak leaf hydrangea and native azaleas. It would be nice to have these but I have doubts about whether the soil is acidic enough. There will be no amendments

Others such as spice bush, red twig dogwood and elderberry I think are suitable.

Thanks.

Atlanta, Ga, Chattahoochee woo
jeffthelimitcom
Feb 5, 2018 8:55 AM CST
greene said:Contact the University of Georgia; they do soil testing.

Also, there have been surveys done. UGA can most likely direct you to the survey of the area where you are working.
Here is an example of the surveys.
<link removed>

Seedlings can be purchased through Georgia Forestry; many species are already sold out but you can at least get an idea of the types of trees offered so you can plan ahead for next season.
<link removed>


My acorn status prevents posting (reposting) links.

I'll see what UGA has to offer. We won't be putting any trees back in as most of this is woodlands but it is interesting that the seedling costs are so low.

The farms that sell native azaleas and other native plants seem to open later in the season. It strikes me, now that I've worked with more than one group removing Japanese Privet, how pervasive this problem is.


haaklindsay
Feb 5, 2018 12:56 PM CST
Hi, anyone knows where I can find micronized Greensand? I want it to react a bit faster with the soil. I'm not very happy with conventional coarse/sandy Greensand.

justinpeterson96
May 29, 2018 11:24 AM CST
haaklindsay said:Hi, anyone knows where I can find micronized Greensand? I want it to react a bit faster with the soil. I'm not very happy with conventional coarse/sandy Greensand.


Hi Lindsay,
I've been using Azomite for a long time and came across this product that has the same benefits of Azomite (70 minerals) plus the benefits of greensand. It is a 2 in 1 product and I think it is very good stuff.
I found it on Amazon: Super Greensand

I think it will help you with the problem you are having on your soil

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