Plant ID forum: Plant identification

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Exton Pennsylvania
BradenOverstreet1
Feb 6, 2018 9:05 PM CST
I found these while on a walk in the woods. If anyone can tell me what plant they come from that would be a real help.
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Name: Tofi
Sumatera, Indonesia
Vegetable Grower Butterflies Garden Procrastinator Roses Bookworm Tomato Heads
Tropicals Salvias Plays in the sandbox Frogs and Toads Fruit Growers Sempervivums
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tofitropic
Feb 6, 2018 11:37 PM CST
Wondering if that is somekind of gall ?, from some type of trees (oak or other trees)
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
My dogs love me; some people don't.
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greene
Feb 7, 2018 10:57 AM CST
Look up Gouty Oak Galls; they start out smooth but over time they become woody.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: Andrea Reagan
Astatula, Florida (Zone 9a)
I collect seeds
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Kevalsha
Feb 9, 2018 3:01 PM CST
These may belong to an ear tree. Enterlobium cyclocarpum (Elephant-ear tree).
Kevalsha
Name: Courtney Cahoon
North Carolina, U.S.A. (Zone 8a)
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Mayflowers
Feb 9, 2018 8:25 PM CST
I see those around here on cedar trees. What kinda trees are in that forest or around the area u picked them up at.
Name: Courtney Cahoon
North Carolina, U.S.A. (Zone 8a)
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Mayflowers
Feb 9, 2018 8:31 PM CST
Biodiversity and galls

One of the most striking things about galls is their astonishing variety; there are myriad causers and hosts, shapes and sizes. Galls are just one illustration of the incredible biodiversity (i.e. the variety of life) in our forests, and on the planet as a whole.

Take for example the alien-looking galls on stinging nettle leaves (Urtica dioica) caused by a rust fungus (Puccinia urticata); or the galls on bracken (Pteridium aquilinum) resulting from the activities of a tiny fly (Chirosia grossicauda), which causes the leaves to distort and curl over; or the hairy structures on germander speedwell (Veronica chamaedrys), giving away the presence of a gall midge (Jaapiella veronicae).

Some galls causers rely on more than one host. A fungus known as Gymnosporangium clavariiforme produces strange orange tentacle-like growths on juniper (Juniperus communis). The spores from these then infect the leaves of hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna), resulting in more galls, which are very different in their growth form, and these then re-infect juniper, and so on. This clearly demonstrates the fact that, the greater the plant diversity there is in an ecosystem, the more species will be supported overall.

Just something I thought could be helpful
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
My dogs love me; some people don't.
Deer Bookworm Keeper of Poultry Vermiculture Garden Ideas: Master Level Region: Georgia
Plant Identifier Rabbit Keeper Composter Garden Sages Native Plants and Wildflowers Herbs
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greene
Feb 9, 2018 8:38 PM CST
Mayflowers said:Biodiversity and galls

One of the most striking things about galls is their astonishing variety; there are myriad causers and hosts, shapes and sizes. Galls are just one illustration of the incredible biodiversity (i.e. the variety of life) in our forests, and on the planet as a whole.

Take for example the alien-looking galls on stinging nettle leaves (Urtica dioica) caused by a rust fungus (Puccinia urticata); or the galls on bracken (Pteridium aquilinum) resulting from the activities of a tiny fly (Chirosia grossicauda), which causes the leaves to distort and curl over; or the hairy structures on germander speedwell (Veronica chamaedrys), giving away the presence of a gall midge (Jaapiella veronicae).

Some galls causers rely on more than one host. A fungus known as Gymnosporangium clavariiforme produces strange orange tentacle-like growths on juniper (Juniperus communis). The spores from these then infect the leaves of hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna), resulting in more galls, which are very different in their growth form, and these then re-infect juniper, and so on. This clearly demonstrates the fact that, the greater the plant diversity there is in an ecosystem, the more species will be supported overall.

Just something I thought could be helpful


Credit for above quote:
https://treesforlife.org.uk/fo...

Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: Courtney Cahoon
North Carolina, U.S.A. (Zone 8a)
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Mayflowers
Feb 11, 2018 1:46 AM CST
Thank you green for sharing where the info came from. The site want to me post links. When I tried it said something about being new.
Thumb of 2018-02-11/Mayflowers/d556fc
Thank-you for sharing there's some good info on the site
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
My dogs love me; some people don't.
Deer Bookworm Keeper of Poultry Vermiculture Garden Ideas: Master Level Region: Georgia
Plant Identifier Rabbit Keeper Composter Garden Sages Native Plants and Wildflowers Herbs
Image
greene
Feb 11, 2018 6:50 AM CST
Yes, new folks can't post links until they have been here a short while (I think it helps to stop spammers?) but most of us will seek out the link and post it for you.

There is a ton of good information here on NGA. Thumbs up And more is added every day. Have fun!


Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"

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