Gardening Ideas forum: Frugal Vermicomposting

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Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Feb 12, 2018 10:02 AM CST
All right, JoannaKat ~ this is your fault. Whistling You shared this link a while back and I could not get it out of my mind.

https://deepgreenpermaculture....

I garden in three raised beds and when I find worms I will add them to the raised beds.

I needed to provide a reason for them to stay.

I was looking for a container that would be smaller to fit in my raised beds. I had considered buying flower pots/drain trays, even a water meter box with a lid.

The frugal part of this idea was a friend suggesting a large coffee (plastic) can as they are plentiful. The one I chose to recycle was a 37 ounce size, measuring 7 inches tall and 6 1/4 across.

Using a hole saw, I drilled a number of holes in the sides.


Thumb of 2018-02-12/pod/c291de
The next step was to remove the base. It was more difficult to make it look neat but I suspect the worms won't protest.


Thumb of 2018-02-12/pod/29f01e

Now to install it in a newly moved raised bed. I saw a lot of worms in this bed when I relocated it.


Thumb of 2018-02-12/pod/1a3f72
Will be starting to add fruit/vegetable scraps/egg shells, as well as more coffee grounds so I can make more containers. Green Grin!


Thumb of 2018-02-12/pod/d3400d


I positioned it near a side so I can easily add compost material.

Depending on how long it takes to fill this one, I may do two to a bed. If it fills quickly, I can easily take it out and relocate it to another area of the raised bed.

I believe one of the bonuses will be this type of composting shouldn't attract the nighttime varmints. Crossing Fingers!

I tip my hat to you. Thank you, @joannakat


Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
Image
joannakat
Feb 12, 2018 10:13 AM CST
pod said:All right, JoannaKat ~ this is your fault. Whistling You shared this link a while back and I could not get it out of my mind.

https://deepgreenpermaculture....

I garden in three raised beds and when I find worms I will add them to the raised beds.

I needed to provide a reason for them to stay.

I was looking for a container that would be smaller to fit in my raised beds. I had considered buying flower pots/drain trays, even a water meter box with a lid.

The frugal part of this idea was a friend suggesting a large coffee (plastic) can as they are plentiful. The one I chose to recycle was a 37 ounce size, measuring 7 inches tall and 6 1/4 across.

Using a hole saw, I drilled a number of holes in the sides.


Thumb of 2018-02-12/pod/c291de
The next step was to remove the base. It was more difficult to make it look neat but I suspect the worms won't protest.


Thumb of 2018-02-12/pod/29f01e

Now to install it in a newly moved raised bed. I saw a lot of worms in this bed when I relocated it.


Thumb of 2018-02-12/pod/1a3f72
Will be starting to add fruit/vegetable scraps/egg shells, as well as more coffee grounds so I can make more containers. Green Grin!


Thumb of 2018-02-12/pod/d3400d


I positioned it near a side so I can easily add compost material.

Depending on how long it takes to fill this one, I may do two to a bed. If it fills quickly, I can easily take it out and relocate it to another area of the raised bed.

I believe one of the bonuses will be this type of composting shouldn't attract the nighttime varmints. Crossing Fingers!

I tip my hat to you. Thank you, @joannakat




Aw, you're welcome, but also, thank YOU! What a great idea! I've seen systems like this for sale but I prefer yours because I love reusing and recycling. Your method taps the best of both worlds!

Please do update us as time goes by. The big question is, will something eventually dig it up? I have a problem here with omnivorous chipmunks. They're feisty and plentiful and very industrious. I'd love to try this, but I'm concerned that they might dig the whole thing up.

Can't wait to hear your progress! So happy you posted! Thumbs up
AKA Joey.
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Feb 12, 2018 10:17 AM CST
Thanks... I don't think I will have a problem with something digging it up. You see the cattle panel laying to one side in the third photo. That keeps my kitties from using the bed as a litter box. It should also deter digging varmints. Crossing Fingers!
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: James
Fabens,TX (Zone 8a)
Image
Txtea
Feb 12, 2018 5:20 PM CST
@pod I love your idea, I have 4 raised beds and am going to try your way. Thanks a million.
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Feb 12, 2018 5:24 PM CST
Thanks James, I wish us both success! Hurray! Please add your trials with this system.

I have to wait to accumulate more coffee cans but am always open to new ideas.
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Feb 13, 2018 5:39 PM CST
Looks great @pod Thumbs up . Those coffee container lids are pretty easy to remove so you might want to put a brick or something similar on top.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We should learn from them!
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Feb 13, 2018 9:36 PM CST
You are right. A raccoon could easily manipulate the lid. It may well need a brick. Thanks! Thumbs up
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
Image
joannakat
Feb 13, 2018 10:32 PM CST
Protein supplement powder comes in pretty good plastic containers too and they have a screw-on top (mostly)! In case you're looking for alternatives.

AKA Joey.
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Feb 14, 2018 7:04 AM CST
A container with a screw on lid might be a good option also. Thanks! Thumbs up
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
Image
joannakat
Feb 14, 2018 7:38 AM CST
pod said:A container with a screw on lid might be a good option also. Thanks! Thumbs up


On second thought, it might be a bit difficult to remove when it's in the ground. And can racoons unscrew things? I do know they can really screw things up.... Hilarious!
AKA Joey.
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Feb 14, 2018 7:52 AM CST
If the lid protrudes above the ground a bit it shouldn't be difficult to remove. Probably the biggest problem with any plastic container is that raccoons are pretty good at shredding things, and those types of containers are pretty light weight. But, you can always try it and see what happens. We get a few raccoons here but usually just during the breeding season. We don't have damage issues with them.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We should learn from them!
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Feb 14, 2018 9:51 AM CST
Here I was just thinking how good it was that the coffee can lid was black. That should make the compost decompose faster due to warmth in winter as well.

I'll have to keep an open mind about other options. Although I'm not too worried as I have a large fenced yard with a dog and kitties in it. They discourage all comers. Thumbs up
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Feb 14, 2018 6:40 PM CST
I'd go with your original plan @pod . If you have any problem then try a different option. Any of those containers are pretty easy to come by.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We should learn from them!
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
Image
joannakat
Feb 14, 2018 9:46 PM CST
You're probably not going to have to worry too much about the compost decomposing. The worms will probably eat it all first and then you'll have lots of "black gold" for your plants! Hurray!
AKA Joey.
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Feb 14, 2018 9:49 PM CST
I love this idea. There are more options for container choices. Today I was thinking about some gallon plastic jars with screw on lids that would work as well. I may try a variety and see if one works better than the others.

I also hope others that have different ideas will let us know what they used and how well it worked for them. Crossing Fingers!
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Feb 14, 2018 10:53 PM CST
How about a plastic 5 gal. paint bucket with lid? Available at farm stores, $3 to $4. Joint compound for sheetrock work uses the same style buckets so if you know anyone that does sheetrock work you may be able to get them for free.
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We should learn from them!
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Feb 15, 2018 7:31 AM CST
I truly think the 5 gallon containers would work well in a large garden area. It would make for an easy way of adding compost to the garden spot.

Mine are raised beds with improved soil. I'm too vintage (read lazy) to dig that deep. Whistling

I do think this is limited only by my ambition and by our imagination.
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Mac
Soon to be MidCoast, ME (Zone 6a)
Ex zones 4b, 8b, 9a, 9b
Cat Lover Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Frogs and Toads Vermiculture
Critters Allowed Vegetable Grower Canning and food preservation Annuals Morning Glories Sedums
Image
McCannon
Feb 15, 2018 8:41 AM CST
Hey, you have to use what's best for you. I was just throwing out a couple additional ideas. We're anxious to see what you come up with Smiling .
The aboriginal people of the world and many other cultures share a common respect for nature and the universe, and all of the life that it holds. We should learn from them!
Name: Mone
Chicago *O'Hare/Lake* (Zone 6a)
Plumerias Bee Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge)
Image
pitimpinai
Feb 17, 2018 1:17 PM CST
I am puzzled by the amount of work discussed here.
For the past 32 years I have been burying kitchen scraps directly in my garden. Only after a couple months, I would always find a large number of big, fat worms in the very spot I buried the veg & fruit scraps. There is no need for any worm tunnel to get these results:
Thumb of 2018-02-17/pitimpinai/5cf21c
Thumb of 2018-02-17/pitimpinai/139c3c
Thumb of 2018-02-17/pitimpinai/c91b78
Thumb of 2018-02-17/pitimpinai/ce65a5
Thumb of 2018-02-17/pitimpinai/5492ed

[Last edited by pitimpinai - Feb 18, 2018 12:37 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1642728 (19)
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
Image
joannakat
Feb 17, 2018 6:01 PM CST
pitimpinai said:I am puzzled by the amount of work discussed here.
For the past 32 years I have been burying kitchen scraps directly in my garden. Only after a couple months, I would always find a large number big, fat worms in the very spot I buried the veg & fruit scraps. There is no need for any worm tunnel to get these results:
Thumb of 2018-02-17/pitimpinai/5cf21c
Thumb of 2018-02-17/pitimpinai/139c3c
Thumb of 2018-02-17/pitimpinai/c91b78
Thumb of 2018-02-17/pitimpinai/ce65a5
Thumb of 2018-02-17/pitimpinai/5492ed



Beautiful results! But when you have perennials you can't dig around or near, having a permanent container is a great advantage. It's also great if you want to harvest your worms for any reason.

Plus, some of us have creature problems that make burying scraps untenable. For me, it's those darn (but cute) chipmunks. If I bury, they dig and feast. That means no decomp for me, and no worms for my garden. AND, a great food supply for them means they nest nearby which, no matter how cute they are, I do not want.

I just have one question for you: When's dinner? Smiling

AKA Joey.

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