Ask a Question forum: Fittonia/Nerve Plant

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Ohio
Plantmom23
Feb 12, 2018 12:32 PM CST
Hi!! I have a nerve plant growing in a mason jar that was doing just great for a year or more, and I recently moved to a different dorm room, though I think it's getting, for the most part, the same amount of sun and watering. There were three different shoots (branches?? - not sure what to call them) of the plant, and the first one wilted and started drying up a few weeks ago. Now the second one is doing the same even though the third one is fine and the soil is moist. I thought I had watered it too much, but after draining the extra water the leaves are still limp, and the bottom ones on the shoot are starting to dry out. What should I do??
Thanks!
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Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
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porkpal
Feb 12, 2018 2:40 PM CST
It would be much easier to maintain if it were in a pot with drain holes in the bottom.
Porkpal
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Feb 12, 2018 3:56 PM CST
Not many plants can live long term in a container without drain holes. If nothing else kills them (like root rot), salt buildup would finish them off.
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Feb 13, 2018 4:13 PM CST
I agree with Porkpal and Daisy. You mentioned draining the extra water. It should never have been watered so much that excess water had to be drained. That is why drain holes are so important. It certainly seems that your Fittonia is suffering from root rot and the stems are slowly dying, one at a time.

I suggest taking tip cuttings from each live stem. The tip cuttings should have about 4 leaves. Try rooting them in plain water or a damp potting mix that is covered in a clear plastic bag that will maintain moisture around the leaves. This is a plant that doesn't tolerate dry air well at all, especially when it does not yet have roots. Be sure to provide temps and bright indirect light. No direct sun or the plants will cook inside the plastic.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
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Ohio
Plantmom23
Feb 13, 2018 9:35 PM CST
Thank you all! If I repot it in a pot with a draining hole, should I still take a cutting or should that fix the problem?
Thanks!
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Feb 14, 2018 3:29 PM CST
I think the roots are already severely damaged from staying wet and are unlikely to recover even in a better pot. You can try, but keep your expectations low.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

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