Views: 112, Replies: 9 » Jump to the end
Scarborough, Maine
farmermartha
Feb 13, 2018 3:27 PM CST
Can I possibly be successful growing okra in southern coastal Maine?
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
Image
Philipwonel
Feb 13, 2018 4:10 PM CST
Maybe 🤔
There are a couple quick maturing varieties, out there.
I'd recommend you start them inside under lites, in some kind of peat pots, early as you can.
I say peat pots, because they don't take very kindly to have there roots disturbed being transplanted.

Calculations... Up to you .

Good Luck 👍
😎😎😎
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Scarborough, Maine
farmermartha
Feb 13, 2018 4:19 PM CST
My garden primer book, written by a Maine gardener, says it is possible as well. I have the indoor starter paradise and can devote some space to an attempt. Lots of care, but encouraging high yields. Pickled are an option if I get a windfall!
Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Critters Allowed Region: Arizona Xeriscape Greenhouse Annuals
Cactus and Succulents Bromeliad Adeniums Orchids Tropicals Plumerias
Image
plantmanager
Feb 13, 2018 4:21 PM CST
If you search on 'okra in Maine', you'll find a lot of information. Go for it and let us know how you do.
Handcrafted Coastal Inspired Art SeaMosaics!
Scarborough, Maine
farmermartha
Feb 13, 2018 4:26 PM CST
Will do! I have two spots to plant. Do they need any support/staking?
Name: Tara
Jacksonville, Fl. (Zone 9a)
Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Organic Gardener Garden Sages Birds Frogs and Toads Plant Identifier
Dragonflies Butterflies Hummingbirder Orchids Container Gardener Garden Procrastinator
Image
terrafirma
Feb 13, 2018 4:53 PM CST
I've never found any varieties of okra to need any staking. Good luck with them! Yummy! Drooling
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Feb 13, 2018 9:28 PM CST
I love Okra. Heat and sun. And they need to be planted in situ - root disturbance is a no-no. Even pulling weeds will kill them.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Tara
Jacksonville, Fl. (Zone 9a)
Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Organic Gardener Garden Sages Birds Frogs and Toads Plant Identifier
Dragonflies Butterflies Hummingbirder Orchids Container Gardener Garden Procrastinator
Image
terrafirma
Feb 13, 2018 9:40 PM CST
farmermartha said:Will do! I have two spots to plant.
?


Keep in mind that you'll need "many" plants to get a substantial "serving" of pods.
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
My dogs love me; some people don't.
Deer Bookworm Keeper of Poultry Vermiculture Garden Ideas: Master Level Region: Georgia
Plant Identifier Rabbit Keeper Composter Garden Sages Native Plants and Wildflowers Herbs
Image
greene
Feb 13, 2018 9:44 PM CST
Northern gardeners have to go to some extremes but yes, it can be done.
Okra can be started indoors to extend the season. They are very particular about having their roots disturbed but if you water the small plants and treat them with extreme caution you can successfully transplant them with little or no loss of life.
Good luck and wish you much success with Okra. Thumbs up

Edited to add:
Recommended for Maine short growing season are these varieties:
Cajun Jewel, Lee or Clemson Spineless; the can mature in as little as 53 days.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
[Last edited by greene - Feb 13, 2018 9:51 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1640724 (9)
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Feb 13, 2018 10:10 PM CST
Sister in law grows okra in Minnesota so why not Maine!?!!

For support I wouldn't think so unless you are where you get incredible winds. I would think wind could lay them over.

I start my seeds and transplant in ground when large enough so you should have no problem starting your seeds early. Good luck... please keep us posted.
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by GaNinFl and is called "Old Mill Courtyard"