Permaculture forum: How do you start implementing the multitude of permaculture concepts?

Views: 226, Replies: 11 » Jump to the end
Name: Louise Alley
Central Maine, Waterville (Zone 5a)
BillAlleysDLs
Feb 19, 2018 8:54 AM CST
What do YOU do? Why are you doing it? Please add your ideas and what works for you.
I have a flower bed at my front door so will add herbs and greens to it. There are no paths inside, just wander through and try to miss stepping on stuff. I also have 5 50' rows of day lilies with 6' paths between rows and have been using rugs to deter weeds on paths. If the snow ever leaves or when it's down to an inch I thinking of frost seeding clover in my paths. With the idea of mowing it and using the mulch as side dressing for day lilies. also plan to seed other plants among the lilies if I can find room. Early greens would work.
I've always composted, not too scientific but it works so will continue. Would like to include
other's waste that ends in land fills. I do gather leaves folks put out on the curb.
I could rattle on, but wonder if anyone else has an iterest in this thread? Louise
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Feb 19, 2018 9:18 AM CST
Louise - it is more challenging to incorporate permaculture ideas into existing landscapes rather than "clean slates". To me, the main concept is to make your plot more sustainable. I use fall leaves for mulching beds rather than using shredded wood mulch. You can spot-compost veggie and fruit scraps along with coffee grounds right in your garden beds. Interplanting in your beds is fun and can be productive in terms of building the soil and nurturing companion plants. I can mix vegetables and herbs in a bed with shrubs, roses, perennials and a few annuals for color. I would suggest a basic permaculture book to get ideas of exactly how much you can accomplish.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: Louise Alley
Central Maine, Waterville (Zone 5a)
BillAlleysDLs
Feb 19, 2018 1:20 PM CST
Thanks, spot composting is a good idea. I've tried coffee grounds on lilium; attempting to disciurage the lily beedle. I have the Gaia's Garden and Will Bonsall's Essential Guide to Radical, Self-Reliant Growing. All full of overwelming ideas. As you suggest - a little here and there and keep reading. Thanks again for your response.
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Feb 19, 2018 2:07 PM CST
Louise - everyone's situation is different so it's hard to make suggestions as to what can be done. Permaculture goes beyond the garden but a lot of us are a little more locked-in on our current situation. Another idea is to make hugelkultur beds or berms. It's more a premise of disposing of the excess carbon in fallen tree branches while enriching soil. Some are even experimenting with more of a level hugel bed rather than the raised mounds. Using rainwater or making a rain water garden that can, at times, survive going dry. Lots of ideas because permaculture covers a broad range of practices.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
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pod
Feb 19, 2018 10:01 PM CST
Baby steps here. I wish I could say I incorporate more but...

I use the leaves between the raised beds. It makes the path less muddy and when they have broken down, they can be added to the beds the next fall with the new fallen leaves in the pathways. I also gather the smaller deadwood branches and twigs and add them to the raised beds as well.

I also harvest rainwater for the plants. I garden in the raised beds but tuck various herbs in here and there.

I hope you do "rattle on" Louise. I am always interested in learning more. Sadly this forum isn't too active.
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Feb 20, 2018 9:07 AM CST
Kristi - totally agree with you. It would be nice if this forum was more active. It used to be.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Feb 20, 2018 9:46 AM CST
Yes and I always enjoyed reading and learning.
I am afraid I am not so knowledgeable and don't have much to contribute. Sad
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Feb 21, 2018 10:55 AM CST
My problem seems to be good intentions but not so much time to implement.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: Caroline Scott
Calgary (Zone 4a)
Charter ATP Member Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Peonies Lilies Enjoys or suffers cold winters Winter Sowing
Bulbs Region: Canadian Garden Ideas: Master Level Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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CarolineScott
Mar 7, 2018 9:28 AM CST
I think you implement one new idea and go from there. Don't try to do it all in one season. I have two hugel beds where I have buried branches. On an old established lot, it takes time to bring in perma culture practices. But over several seasons, I think progress in that direction is possible.
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Mar 7, 2018 10:41 AM CST
Caroline - I keep intending to make a hugel bed or two but my branches and excess fall leaves go to the edge of my property that drops off to the wetlands. Primary goal for me is to contain soil erosion. I would love to put in fruit trees or shrubs with "companion" planting but I don't get a lot of sun.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: Caroline Scott
Calgary (Zone 4a)
Charter ATP Member Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Peonies Lilies Enjoys or suffers cold winters Winter Sowing
Bulbs Region: Canadian Garden Ideas: Master Level Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
CarolineScott
Mar 9, 2018 12:00 AM CST
My yard is becoming more and more shaded as the trees and shrubs mature. I may have one or two taken down.
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Mar 9, 2018 9:06 AM CST
Caroline - I love my trees so I cringe when any of them have to come down for structural or other reasons.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb

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