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Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
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joannakat
Feb 21, 2018 4:27 PM CST
I just went out to see what's going on in my mini yard and found that some of my daffodils are poking through the soaked soil! I'm in north-central Massachusetts. We had a snow storm with very cold weather a few days ago, followed by rain accompanied by warm weather (close to 70 F) that melted the snow. Everything is soaked. One of my peonies is showing pips too.

I expect it to get colder again soon, and maybe even freeze and stay that way until closer to spring. My question is, are they going to be okay?

I already had all my grape hyacinths sprout greens in the fall due to a blast of warmer weather. They've stayed green under all the freezing snow, but we'll see how they do later on.

Hope some of you can provide some insight.
AKA Joey.
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Feb 21, 2018 4:41 PM CST
Won't be a problem.
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
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joannakat
Feb 21, 2018 4:42 PM CST
stone said:Won't be a problem.


Ahhh, thank you!

AKA Joey.
Name: Bill
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
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BigBill
Feb 21, 2018 4:47 PM CST
I think that spring bulbs are genetically built to withstand these late winter/spring extremes. But these standing water that you have might cause a problem.
The warm to cold fluctuations are one thing, standing water? Later this spring if you remember, I would get a couple of long metal rods and use them to poke holes into the soil in and around the bulb beds. I did this in my snowdrops, crocus and daffodil beds every fall when I raked leaves.
I am sure that some of these dozens of holes that I would poke yearly get compromised but I knew that some might remain open to provide drainage early in the spring. Standing water from ice and snow melt never plagued me again.
Even so Joanna, I think that they will survive anyway.
Lived on Long Island for 58 years.
"Our children are the messages we send to a time that we will never see."
[Last edited by BigBill - Feb 21, 2018 4:49 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1645333 (4)
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Feb 21, 2018 4:50 PM CST
Joanna,

I doubt the cold weather will even slow them down. Here are some photos I took last March 28., after a surprise foot of snow. We can expect surprise snow and hard freezes through June - it doesn't seem to hurt anything long term. If trees and shrubs bud out and are repeatedly frozen off, that sometimes will kill them but not the bulbs. This year, the crocus have been frozen (10F), thawed (60F) and snowed on (4 inches and expecting more tonight). They are fine.

What I really hate is when it gets warm too soon and the daffodils have flowers with 1" stems. Smiling
Thumb of 2018-02-21/DaisyI/109d9c
Thumb of 2018-02-21/DaisyI/18200f
Thumb of 2018-02-21/DaisyI/57759d

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
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joannakat
Feb 21, 2018 4:51 PM CST
BigBill said:I think that spring bulbs are genetically built to withstand these late winter/spring extremes. But these standing water that you have might cause a problem.
The warm to cold fluctuations are one thing, standing water? Later this spring if you remember, I would get a couple of long metal rods and use them to poke holes into the soil in and around the bulb beds. I did this in my snowdrops, crocus and daffodil beds every fall when I raked leaves.
I am sure that some of these dozens of holes that I would poke yearly get compromised but I knew that some might remain open to provide drainage early in the spring. Standing water from ice and snow melt never plagued me again.
Even so Joanna, I think that they will survive anyway.
Lived on Long Island for 58 years.


Thanks so much Bill. I don't think the pooling will be a problem once the season progresses. We're just soaked right now due to the heavy snow that was followed by the insta-thaw! But I will watch and keep your advice in mind. If the water doesn't drain, you'll find me out there poking those holes. Thumbs up

AKA Joey.
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
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joannakat
Feb 21, 2018 4:53 PM CST
DaisyI said:Joanna,

I doubt the cold weather will even slow them down. Here are some photos I took last March 28., after a surprise foot of snow. We can expect surprise snow and hard freezes through June - it doesn't seem to hurt anything long term. If trees and shrubs bud out and are repeatedly frozen off, that sometimes will kill them but not the bulbs. This year, the crocus have been frozen (10F), thawed (60F) and snowed on (4 inches and expecting more tonight). They are fine.

What I really hate is when it gets warm too soon and the daffodils have flowers with 1" stems. Smiling
Thumb of 2018-02-21/DaisyI/109d9c
Thumb of 2018-02-21/DaisyI/18200f
Thumb of 2018-02-21/DaisyI/57759d


Beautiful pictures Daisy! But....snow? In Nevada? Blinking
AKA Joey.
Name: kathy
Michigan
Zone 4b, near St. Clair MI
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katesflowers
Feb 21, 2018 5:00 PM CST
Hi Joanna
I have grape hyacinths (muscari), too. They always send up new leaves in the fall - normal. That's how they store the sun's energy for next spring's bloom. Kind of a nice marking system, too.
My daffodils also start shooting up in late February each year. We are mid-winter in February with lots more snow-ice-rain-wind. Never a problem. They always bloom & multiply.
"Things won are done, joy's soul lies in the doing." Shakespeare
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Feb 21, 2018 5:19 PM CST
Last winter was weird. Our usual annual rainfall is 7.5 inches and mostly in the summer from the monsoons that travel up from Arizona (winter is dry and cold). Last year, we didn't get any summer rain but did get 20 inches of winter rain plus another 3 or 4 feet of snow. I actually had to shovel snow! After it snows, the temperatures always drop to single digits and the snow evaporates. It doesn't melt - it doesn't have a chance to melt. Also in winter, when the wind blows, the humidity often drops to 0% (and it always blows in Reno).

This year, we had our first snow on Sunday and are expecting our second tomorrow. I got 4 inches at my house and in the sheltered spots (like in front of the doors), it has turned into an ice block because the temperature hasn't been above freezing. I have sprinkled sand on the ice so I don't die going out the door. The snow in the open areas has evaporated now but the soil is still absolutely dry. Luckily, I dragged hoses for 2 days last week and watered the whole yard really well. After this cold though, I will have to do it again.

Today, it is in the upper 20's but the sun is shining bright. The dog and I took a 6 - 7 mile hike up the mountain side - it was really pretty. Photo attached (the clouds are tomorrow's storm). My house is down and around the corner to the left.
Thumb of 2018-02-21/DaisyI/e33c35

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
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ctcarol
Feb 21, 2018 6:09 PM CST
Hilarious! Thank you for that weather report, Daisy! Just yesterday I was thinking about relocating to Reno, in spite of the wind. I'm over it. Hilarious! I've only been there in summer.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Feb 21, 2018 6:34 PM CST
Carol, I love Reno. We are recent transplants from California (4 years), and I have not regretted our decision for even a moment. I love the drama of the weather and the seasons. Never a dull moment. And, you'd have a built in friend. Group hug Come visit!

And dry cold is like dry heat - you don't feel it.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
[Last edited by DaisyI - Feb 21, 2018 6:35 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1645433 (11)
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
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joannakat
Feb 21, 2018 7:32 PM CST
katesflowers said:Hi Joanna
I have grape hyacinths (muscari), too. They always send up new leaves in the fall - normal. That's how they store the sun's energy for next spring's bloom. Kind of a nice marking system, too.
My daffodils also start shooting up in late February each year. We are mid-winter in February with lots more snow-ice-rain-wind. Never a problem. They always bloom & multiply.


I didn't know that about the muscari! This is only my second year with them so thank you very much! Thumbs up
AKA Joey.
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
Image
joannakat
Feb 21, 2018 7:35 PM CST
DaisyI said:Last winter was weird. Our usual annual rainfall is 7.5 inches and mostly in the summer from the monsoons that travel up from Arizona (winter is dry and cold). Last year, we didn't get any summer rain but did get 20 inches of winter rain plus another 3 or 4 feet of snow. I actually had to shovel snow! After it snows, the temperatures always drop to single digits and the snow evaporates. It doesn't melt - it doesn't have a chance to melt. Also in winter, when the wind blows, the humidity often drops to 0% (and it always blows in Reno).

This year, we had our first snow on Sunday and are expecting our second tomorrow. I got 4 inches at my house and in the sheltered spots (like in front of the doors), it has turned into an ice block because the temperature hasn't been above freezing. I have sprinkled sand on the ice so I don't die going out the door. The snow in the open areas has evaporated now but the soil is still absolutely dry. Luckily, I dragged hoses for 2 days last week and watered the whole yard really well. After this cold though, I will have to do it again.

Today, it is in the upper 20's but the sun is shining bright. The dog and I took a 6 - 7 mile hike up the mountain side - it was really pretty. Photo attached (the clouds are tomorrow's storm). My house is down and around the corner to the left.
Thumb of 2018-02-21/DaisyI/e33c35



Weird is putting it mildly! And I thought the weather in MA was strange!
AKA Joey.
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
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ctcarol
Feb 21, 2018 7:38 PM CST
Weather on the west coast is always strange!
Name: kathy
Michigan
Zone 4b, near St. Clair MI
Cottage Gardener Lilies Organic Gardener
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katesflowers
Feb 22, 2018 7:09 AM CST
Part of the draw to my most favored gardeners (you) are the weather and conditions reports. In the back of my mind I always wonder where the perfect place to live would be. As your reports come in, I realize there's no place like home (even with all its warts) for each of us. We've become accustomed to the quirks and roll with Mother Nature's punches.
"Things won are done, joy's soul lies in the doing." Shakespeare
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
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joannakat
Feb 22, 2018 7:25 AM CST
katesflowers said:Part of the draw to my most favored gardeners (you) are the weather and conditions reports. In the back of my mind I always wonder where the perfect place to live would be. As your reports come in, I realize there's no place like home (even with all its warts) for each of us. We've become accustomed to the quirks and roll with Mother Nature's punches.


Well, I'm not quite there yet Kathy. I've always loved the idea of gardening--nurturing what mom nature has to give us--but I've only really gotten into it over the last few years. So I'm still learning about the quirks of tulips and daffodils and other amazing things. Plus, living in Massachusetts? Well, if you like erratic weather, this is THE place to live! nodding

Maybe one day, the concept of home will include additional land on which to garden. Right now, it's only a small strip so each little plant is precious.

AKA Joey.
Name: kathy
Michigan
Zone 4b, near St. Clair MI
Cottage Gardener Lilies Organic Gardener
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katesflowers
Feb 22, 2018 9:46 AM CST
Massachusetts? Oh well, now that I think about weather patterns, picture us in Michigan winding up for the pitch...right at Northeast USA. Our weather goes to you within 24 hours. Ha...I feel better already, misery loves company!
"Things won are done, joy's soul lies in the doing." Shakespeare
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
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joannakat
Feb 22, 2018 10:12 AM CST
katesflowers said:Massachusetts? Oh well, now that I think about weather patterns, picture us in Michigan winding up for the pitch...right at Northeast USA. Our weather goes to you within 24 hours. Ha...I feel better already, misery loves company!


Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing

AKA Joey.
Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Deer Organic Gardener Ferns Herbs Dragonflies
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Bonehead
Feb 22, 2018 10:31 AM CST
DaisyI said:And dry cold is like dry heat - you don't feel it.


As a native to the Pacific Northwest, boy do I have to take exception to that opinion! Dry heat swells my ankles to balloons, dries my skin to a raisin, and makes my nose bleed. I do agree that dry cold may be easier than wet cold, IF you are dressed for it (I rarely am). But, as someone else noted, home is what you are accustomed to.

I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
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joannakat
Feb 22, 2018 12:04 PM CST
Right, so I found out that tulips, all types, are actually perennials in their natural environment, which is the foothills of Turkey. I believe the winters there are very cold and dry. Guess they don't feel the cold, at least, not like we do!

https://www.proflowers.com/blo...
AKA Joey.

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