Ask a Question forum: Money Tree, leaves turning brown

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Kent, United Kingdom
briangardner69
Feb 22, 2018 1:27 AM CST
I have a Money Tree that was doing well. I water it spareingly.it stands next to a large window, so le ty of day time light.
About s month ago I moved it to another room, where there is light, but less direct light. I have also been giving it slightly more water.
Over the past week, several leaves have either fallen or are turning brown .

Any suggestions greatly welcomed. I have attached two photos of my tree

Brian
Thumb of 2018-02-22/briangardner69/adf954


Thumb of 2018-02-22/briangardner69/dc8cd5

Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Feb 22, 2018 9:31 AM CST
Oh, Brian. You moved it to less light, and gave it more water ?😮???
Put it back where it was HAPPY 😀!
If not, go back to your old watering routine . With less lite, it may need less water.
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Kent, United Kingdom
briangardner69
Feb 22, 2018 9:55 AM CST
Thanks for responding.

I have moved it back ,and I'll go back to my previous watering routine, which was to water it fairly scarcely.

Hopefully it will recover. Are they very hardy ? As in "forgiving", and are they quick to recover ?

Thanks gain

Brian
New York, ny
plantobsessed
Feb 22, 2018 2:58 PM CST
I can't help other than to say my money tree has given me so many problems!! I can't seem to make it happy. So I sympathize.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Feb 22, 2018 3:24 PM CST
Your original post is a bit garbled, but moving it back to where it was, does make sense. Money Trees like lots of light and are quite tolerant of a wide range of soil moisture. So don't be too stingy with the water.

You should expect some older, lower leaf loss as the stems grow longer and add more leaves at the ends. That is normal. Those lost leaves are never replaced in the same location; only at the tip ends of stems. In time, this plant tends to grow quite leggy. The best way to prevent that is to pinch out new leaves as they start to emerge. The best way to treat it after it has gotten leggy is by pruning back those leggy stems.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Kent, United Kingdom
briangardner69
Feb 22, 2018 3:29 PM CST
Thanks
I have appreciated

Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Native Plants and Wildflowers Region: Mid-Atlantic Composter Region: Maryland Birds
Cat Lover Dog Lover Region: United States of America
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sallyg
Feb 24, 2018 7:05 AM CST
just a thought- might want to check the bottom of those leaves for dirt or webbing.I don't know if these are prone to spider mites, but overall, that seems like how some of my plants look with mites.
( deciphered the typos in the original post, that looks like my typos on my phone, lol)
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Feb 24, 2018 8:40 AM CST
Good call, Sally! A second look at the photo does seem to reveal some mottled looking leaves that may be spider mite damage. Mites are more prone on plants that have experienced under watering, which I suspect may be the case here.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

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