Daylilies forum: Raised Beds and Tunnel Hoops for starting Daylily Seeds.

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Name: Kathy
(Zone 5a)
Daylilies Seed Starter Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Garden Art Plant and/or Seed Trader
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TreeClimber
Feb 22, 2018 9:49 AM CST
Can anyone suggest a source or a diy for tunnel hoops? I have several 4x4 raised beds that I want to grow daylily seeds in. I need to protect them from our dog, deer and other critters. My beds are 18" high, and made of pvc so I need/want to be able to just stick the ends in the soil for support so I'll need extra length for that and still be able to leave them on until seedlings are decent size. Thanks for any help.
[Last edited by TreeClimber - Feb 22, 2018 9:50 AM (+)]
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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Feb 22, 2018 10:38 AM CST
You can cut lengths of "corn crib" mesh or similar welded metal material and bend them over the beds which would protect them from critters but not the weather. They can be covered with plastic or Remay fabric if wanted. I've also used plumbing piping bent into semi-circles with the ends pushed into the ground, then covered but somehow you need to get the ends to stay upright otherwise the cover tends to pull them inward.
Name: Kathy
(Zone 5a)
Daylilies Seed Starter Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Garden Art Plant and/or Seed Trader
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TreeClimber
Feb 22, 2018 11:03 AM CST
I had to look and see what corn crib mesh was ... figured it was similar to what I call "chicken wire". I'd have to get a high enough loop to reach in and weed or remove it when ever I need to do that task.

Thanks for joining the conversation Sue.
Name: Ken
East S.F. Bay Area (Zone 9a)
Region: California
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CaliFlowers
Feb 22, 2018 11:10 AM CST
I'd use wire screening such as this;
YARDGARD 308312B 48 Inch by 100 Foot Galvanized Welded Wire Fence https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000RZAP4E/

Or plastic fencing;
Houseables Snow Fence, Temporary Fencing, Safety Netting, Single, Green, 4 x 100' Feet, Above Ground, Mesh, Garden Plastic Barrier, For Deer, Kids, Swimming Pool, Silt, Lawn, Rabbits, Poultry, Dogs https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N4AMZ8Y/

At first I thought you wanted frost protection, but the hazards you mention are never going away, so you'll need something that can be left in place and still allows good access.

The plastic fencing might be the best option.

I'd sink a steel T-post at each corner of the beds. Use a post long enough to accommodate a 4' tall side panel sitting on top of the raised bed sides.

Attach two 1"x1"s, or #4 rebar or something similar diagonally to opposite post tops, criss-crossing at the center. This will give the whole thing rigidity, and also allows you to put something cheap and lightweight over the top like chicken wire or bird netting.

Then attach the fencing. Use two pieces of (approximately 8-foot) fencing to wrap the bed from opposite corners, attached securely with zip ties or wire. The two loose ends are your "gates", so attach them with with hooks or something easily detachable so the panels can be pulled back for access.





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[Last edited by CaliFlowers - Feb 22, 2018 11:17 AM (+)]
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Name: Sally
Pinconning, MI
Region: Michigan Daylilies
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Salowicious
Feb 22, 2018 11:26 AM CST
I had my husband drive re-rod into the ground at the inside corner of my raised beds. When needed, we bend flexible pipe over the re-rod ends and clip on shade cloth, netting, row cover etc.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Feb 22, 2018 11:35 AM CST
TreeClimber said:I had to look and see what corn crib mesh was ... figured it was similar to what I call "chicken wire". I'd have to get a high enough loop to reach in and weed or remove it when ever I need to do that task.

Thanks for joining the conversation Sue.


It's not the same as chicken wire, it is more rigid (like Ken's first link). It's easy enough to lift off the individual "arches" to weed inside, or get something with mesh large enough to reach through.

Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Region: Alabama
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Seedfork
Feb 22, 2018 2:02 PM CST
I have seen a lot of tunnel hoops, and have used a few. I found that I wanted something easier to work with. I was given some party tent supports and made triangle covers out of the four of them. Not very likely you will have that opportunity, but you could make a wood frame and that would work almost as well. The aluminum frames were very light and they don't rust or rot. I wanted something more ridged that I could just prop open from either side and hold open with a prop while planting or weeding etc.
Also I had a lot of problems with smaller critters digging up my seedlings (Amaryllis seedlings when I made the covers). So I preferred to use hardware cloth with 1/2 inch openings. I have had these covers for several years now, I just put the hardware cloth on three of them last year, I had been using the deer fence netting over them. I much prefer the much sturdier hardware cloth, but it does have sharp points where the wire is cut so you have to be careful handling it, or tuck the sharp points under out of the way.
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[Last edited by Seedfork - Feb 22, 2018 6:33 PM (+)]
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Name: Kathy
(Zone 5a)
Daylilies Seed Starter Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Garden Art Plant and/or Seed Trader
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TreeClimber
Feb 22, 2018 5:14 PM CST
Such great ideas everyone, I so appreciate all the help.

These are the beds I am going to use .....


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Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Region: Alabama
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Seedfork
Feb 22, 2018 6:08 PM CST
Those look great!
Name: Ken
East S.F. Bay Area (Zone 9a)
Region: California
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CaliFlowers
Feb 22, 2018 6:26 PM CST
Nice layout and siting; no trees, full sun all day. Should be sweet.

When thinking about the best way to protect the beds, I imagined that you were going to raise and bloom the seedlings in place. Plus, you said the "D" word. That's why I like having at least 4 feet of height, so you can have room for scapes. It's one thing to have deer nibble the buds from a named cultivar, but a seedling that's never been seen before, why, that would be unthinkable.

Grouped together as the beds are, deer fence might be a better solution in the long run. I've seen 4 x 8 cattle fence panels on farm and livestock supply sites which could be used as a barrier. I think I've seen a garden tip here with instructions.

It's a little extreme, but an electric fencer would be something to think about too. The smaller units aren't that expensive, and you can do it with maybe 4 wires. If you tie colorful pieces of ribbon to the lower wires, domestic animals will only be 'bitten' once.
Name: Kathy
(Zone 5a)
Daylilies Seed Starter Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Garden Art Plant and/or Seed Trader
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TreeClimber
Feb 23, 2018 9:25 AM CST
I have considered fencing the entire area or an electric fence.

I have had that entire area with in ground plantings of daylilies and the Deer didn't bother it much, but last year they did wonder in. I already have an electric fence in a bed in front of the house, just because those 4 legged things came in and ate an entire bed of seedlings a couple years ago.

I have friends who uses green plastic coated wire 4' from TSC, because it blends in with the grass and bushes. They use 4x4's on the corners and depending on how big you make it support it every so many feet, with metal stakes.

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