Houseplants forum: Arabian Jasmine sambac befuds me

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Name: Laurie b
Western Washington (Zone 7b)
Houseplants Region: Pacific Northwest Sedums Orchids Tropicals Region: Mexico
Image
lauriebasler
Feb 25, 2018 7:40 PM CST
Thumb of 2018-02-26/lauriebasler/73c814

Sad plant!

I kept this plant outside in bright shade last summer. This winter has been my first winter caring for any Jasmine. It was not a smashing success. Dryer soil in the winter may have been too dry. Sun from under a T5 light, but should be closer; while close to north window. Humidity is 45% with humidifier. No fert over winter.
Condition:
It is setting buds all over. Flowers mature. At the same time it's budding it is dropping dry tan leaves rapidly. No yellowing or wilting. Just shriveling. A bug problem would have been a relief. If they are there I can't see them.
The care was chose from the most common recommendations online. There are contradictions galore. My care has been inconsistent trying to see some sign of approval from the plant. I'd love a plan for care. I feel completely confused by it, and am just hoping it holds on till summer.
Any ideas out there.



Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Feb 25, 2018 8:32 PM CST
Jasmine are not easy. I suspect yours is as confused as you are. The reduction in light from outside bright shade to the indoor indirect sun is stressful for the leaves. The leaves that grew outdoors are now missing that bright light and are falling off. There is not much you can do about that, but it does argue for keeping it inside year round or putting it in deeper shade when outside so the change in light is not so dramatic.

I don't see any buds in the photo. Are the buds opening or are they blasting?

Once the buds/flowers are done, I suggest you prune back any stems that have lost most of their leaves. Then, it will be ready to push out new growth now that spring is not far away.

The more light you can provide indoors the better. Allow the top half-inch of soil to dry before watering.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Laurie b
Western Washington (Zone 7b)
Houseplants Region: Pacific Northwest Sedums Orchids Tropicals Region: Mexico
Image
lauriebasler
Feb 25, 2018 8:45 PM CST
This is a pic about a month old. There are buds. I am so lazy this Sunday, it's a sin. And with that I will post a current pic.
Is it important to wait for the buds to stop setting before I cut it back. I am going to play Russian roulette with plants again, and remove something to give this plant a better chance.

Would you say they are a plant that likes to get dry between waterings or to remain moist not soggy. Thanks for the quick assistance.

Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Feb 26, 2018 6:13 AM CST
Allow the top half-inch of soil to dry before watering.

I will wait to see the photo before answering your question about pruning.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Laurie b
Western Washington (Zone 7b)
Houseplants Region: Pacific Northwest Sedums Orchids Tropicals Region: Mexico
Image
lauriebasler
Feb 26, 2018 10:05 AM CST
Ok, waiting for the sky to wake up here.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Feb 26, 2018 2:39 PM CST
Laurie - Do you expect that to happen sometime this week? Hilarious!
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Laurie b
Western Washington (Zone 7b)
Houseplants Region: Pacific Northwest Sedums Orchids Tropicals Region: Mexico
Image
lauriebasler
Feb 26, 2018 3:02 PM CST

Hi @WillC.
edited to give you a heads up so you would not have waste time. I will be away till the evening. No rush. Just did not want to keep you waiting. Have a great day. thanks too.

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Here is my proudest accomplishment. Blinking , I don't know why the pics are not better. I took them again hoping to improve, but that did not help, so I am sending them all and expecting they won't help a bit. Let me know. I will take the thing outside no problem.
.


Thumb of 2018-02-26/lauriebasler/71eaab


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The 2nd and 3rd pic just show the the brown stems all over, followed by 3rd pic: some small and wrinkey new growth.
Not sure why. Very slightly yellow leaves. So slight.

Next, you see flowers staying on like it's not a sick sick plant, and finally the last showing how just pathetic it is. Poor thing. Be brutal Will. I really need to figure it out. This plant is getting a shot outside this summer, and it better like what I have or it's going to be a shrub, probably a dead shrub.
[Last edited by lauriebasler - Feb 26, 2018 3:07 PM (+)]
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Feb 26, 2018 4:25 PM CST
Your Jasmine is healthy but sparse. I don't know why it lost a lot of leaves, but no matter. Prune back any of the longer stems that do not have flower buds on them.

As the days get longer and the light improves, you should see lots of healthy new growth emerge from the ends of all the stems. Water it as I described above. Keep it potbound, of course!

Be kind to it! Angel
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Laurie b
Western Washington (Zone 7b)
Houseplants Region: Pacific Northwest Sedums Orchids Tropicals Region: Mexico
Image
lauriebasler
Feb 26, 2018 10:02 PM CST

Hi Will;
That is a bit of an understatement. Rolling on the floor laughing I don't know either. Maybe someone left a door open around it. What ever caused this is not a biggy. I am just very surprised to hear it's healthy. It looks like it has anorexia.
Thanks a bunch. I won't worry about it again. I have already cut it back, very short and no flowers. They only last a day anyway.

I think people here would love to see something you grow, or even some of the plants you take care of. That would probably really get a crowd gatherd. I hope you will give it some thought.

night.
[Last edited by lauriebasler - Mar 1, 2018 12:50 AM (+)]
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Name: Laurie b
Western Washington (Zone 7b)
Houseplants Region: Pacific Northwest Sedums Orchids Tropicals Region: Mexico
Image
lauriebasler
Feb 27, 2018 12:46 AM CST
Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing I want sun now, darn it.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Feb 27, 2018 9:47 AM CST
I am good with plants; not so good with a camera; Crying even worse with posting photos. D'Oh! But I will take your suggestion under advisement. Crossing Fingers!
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
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plantladylin
Feb 27, 2018 10:17 AM CST
Laurie, I'm always surprised at the types of plants folks grow as houseplants in different parts of the country! Arabian Jasmine (Jasminum sambac) is a landscape plant here in the south. In your last photo, your plant looks pretty good and I think once spring arrives and it gets more light, it will thrive; they do require a lot of light and warmth.

I planted a small Arabian Jasmine in the backyard at our old house where it received full, hot afternoon sun and I'm thinking of getting one for our current place. We bought this house in October and it has zero curb appeal so we're heading to the nursery later today or tomorrow to hopefully find some Crepe Myrtles and other things for the yard. I have 30 Caladium bulbs arriving tomorrow; three Hibiscus that should arrive in the next week or so, plus a couple of perennials that I recently bought on-line. Our weather has been summer like for a month now with highs in the mid to upper 80's so it looks like Spring passed us by this year.
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
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joannakat
Feb 27, 2018 10:26 AM CST
@WillC, what does bud blasting mean?

Lin, welcome to your new home!
AKA Joey.
Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
Image
plantladylin
Feb 27, 2018 10:32 AM CST
Joanna, Bud blasting is when flowers prematurely abort (they don't get to the opening stage and just fall off) usually due to environmental causes ... sudden temperature changes/extremes, changes in lighting, humidity, water, etc.
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Feb 27, 2018 10:33 AM CST
Sorry, Joanna. I try to avoid technical terms.

Bud blast is when buds on any flowering plant form, but then die or fall off before they open. That is always disappointing after expectations have been raised. Bud blast is usually caused by something in the environment - temperature change, improper watering or a change in location.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Cat Lover Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Region: California Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
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tarev
Feb 27, 2018 11:24 AM CST
Nice to see your plant there Laurie. I do understand why it is somewhat pouting on your side. It likes sustained good humidity, warmth and light. I guess that is just the limitation of your growing environment.

In my homeland, it is our national flower, the buds are harvested and stringed into a lei. Such a lovely scent it has. Environmental conditions there are so humid hot, lots of rain. They are planted in ground, as what Lin said, it is more as a landscape plant. Our soil there is loam and with volcanic content, so it is rich and we got really good drainage. Got to be able to mimic those growing conditions to make it thrive in your home environment. At times, I think we have to really choose which plants to grow indoors, there is just a limitation to conditions appropriate for indoor growing.

So being winter time and cold, growing it indoors, is really a big struggle for this high heat humidity, warm condition loving plant. Got to keep the media moist but not too soggy wet, especially on your side, where for sure the temps are much colder than it likes. It enjoys being on the 75F to 85F sustained temps. Good luck on your plant, it will be a challenge indeed, but it is a nice experiment to do. I also love to experiment how far along I can grow a plant not really conducive for my area, but at times, it is such a struggle indeed, a test of patience.
[Last edited by tarev - Feb 27, 2018 11:31 AM (+)]
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Name: Joanna
North Central Massachusetts (N (Zone 5b)
Life & gardens: make them beautiful
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Vermiculture
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joannakat
Feb 27, 2018 1:14 PM CST
Thank you Will and Lin! Smarter now. Or, at least, more knowledgeable. nodding
AKA Joey.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Feb 27, 2018 2:55 PM CST
There are many plants that are native to warm, humid, tropical environments and it would seem they would fare poorly in indoors in dry northern climates. In fact, we have learned that many of these plant species do very well indoors in cold climates even without raised humidity.

Jasmine will do well indoors as long as the soil and roots are kept appropriately moist and it is not exposed to cold drafts. It is more sensitive and less forgiving of watering lapses than many other more common indoor houseplants, but certainly worth a try if one is up to a challenge.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Laurie b
Western Washington (Zone 7b)
Houseplants Region: Pacific Northwest Sedums Orchids Tropicals Region: Mexico
Image
lauriebasler
Mar 1, 2018 11:36 AM CST
I am reading Don't repot that Plant" this morning. as you recommended Will, So the first chapter is Temperature and Humidity. because of my sad little Jasmine. It's a beautiful book. My day is to check in here, get the house ready for the day, and then turn off everything, and go read in the plant room. I can tell I will be making notes, and marking pages. That is a good day.
I had about 2 long paragraphs written in response to Lin and Tarev, as to how people in my climate get in a position to bring home plants that are obvious to them will be tough. You took care of it in a couple sentences. Thank you from the three of us. Clearly I won't be writing any books.
Thank you Lin, I am so glad that this plant will probably make it till spring. There are a few plants I grow, that I have no expectations of in winter. It's probably weird to sunny climate zone folks, me keeping a plant alive just to get to spring again, but it's a part of the hobby if you live here or you won't have anything but Pothos and Spaths in your collection, and those plants are great, but not enough.
Tarev, I found myself thinking how I would love to have you and Lin come and spend a weekend seeing our nurseries, and what the houseplants are. My houseplant room would probably look oppressive to you as they have a crowded winter with humidifiers chugging and lights glaring. A friends daughter drove by my home the other day and asked if I was growing pot, with all the plants in the windows.
I wish I could take you guys shopping to the houseplant sections of stores near me, so you an see the torture our plants industry tempts us with. Of course it's just too crazy expensive but wow, that would be so fun. I would love to see your hoya's compared to mine, (probably make me cry) and so on, and to see what your markets offer. If I win the lottery I am totally flying you both in. I really enjoy seeing plants grown in Florida and California, and Tarev, your attention to your plants and process of learning are so impressive, as is how helpful your suggestions truly are. I was so glad to see you here. And Lin, I am seeing as much of you now as when I started. I am so glad. Please give an update where ever you like best of the garden additions. I am excited to see your creations.

Ok, don't get rid of any sweaters ladies. I could win the lottery, you never know.
Will, I love the book!!! I thought I would like it, but it's so much better than I ever imagined. I feel better about the Jasmine now guys, thanks.

[Last edited by lauriebasler - Mar 1, 2018 3:39 PM (+)]
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Mar 1, 2018 3:42 PM CST
Thank You! Laurie!
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

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