Landscape Design forum: Need Advise for Extending a Tree Line

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stronglytyped
Feb 28, 2018 10:37 AM CST
I recently moved into a new home and would like to extend a line of evergreens closer to the road. The red box in the attached picture is where I'd like to plant the new evergreens.

Thumb of 2018-02-28/stronglytyped/40d72a

Here is my main concern:

The existing evergreens (the 5 to the right of the red box) are quite tall and wide now, and their needles are thinning out, which is not desirable. Because of their large footprint and sparseness, I do not want to continue using this same type of evergreen. I would like to extend the line using a type of evergreen that will provide maximum privacy and create more of a solid "wall" effect. However, I'm concerned that the mismatch of size and tree type between the old and new trees might look "dumb."

Can anyone provide any tips to help blend the new trees in with the old ones so the the final result will be visually appealing? I don't even know what type of advice I'm looking for... I really wish they would have just done things right to begin with, and I feel like I'm stuck with cleaning up a mess now. But maybe an evergreen type recommendation (location is PA), and perhaps if there's something creative I could do with the landscaping to lessen the abruptness of two completely different tree lines being side-by-side?

Here's a ground level view of the existing evergreens to help show their size:

Thumb of 2018-02-28/stronglytyped/1bbeeb

Thanks!
[Last edited by stronglytyped - Feb 28, 2018 10:41 AM (+)]
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Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Feb 28, 2018 12:09 PM CST
Way to avoid obvious difference does not exist.

Are you going to invest in large trees as it takes decades for evergreens to get that large?
Spruce are the only ones I can think of that hold their shape all the way to the ground when they get large but as I said, that takes decades.
Most evergreens thin out at the bottom with age.

stronglytyped
Feb 28, 2018 12:21 PM CST
RpR said:Way to avoid obvious difference does not exist.

Are you going to invest in large trees as it takes decades for evergreens to get that large?
Spruce are the only ones I can think of that hold their shape all the way to the ground when they get large but as I said, that takes decades.
Most evergreens thin out at the bottom with age.

I'd like evergreens that are smaller and faster growing. They wouldn't need to reach a maximum height of more than 12-20' (although taller is fine). I'd also like to try and find ones that I can plant fairly close together to create a solid privacy barrier within 1-3 years without having to worry about them each becoming too wide and crowding each other long term.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Feb 28, 2018 1:41 PM CST
stronglytyped said:
I'd like evergreens that are smaller and faster growing. They wouldn't need to reach a maximum height of more than 12-20' (although taller is fine). I'd also like to try and find ones that I can plant fairly close together to create a solid privacy barrier within 1-3 years without having to worry about them each becoming too wide and crowding each other long term.


People plant Arborvitae close together and they can be trimmed to keep low but you will be trimming them plus often, if not cared for continually, they will get a dead spot and then you will be replacing it or live with an UGLY scar.
The closer they are planted together the greater the amount of problems you will have.

There are full size Arborvitae, four time as wide, but like most evergreens the bottom will eventually die out leaving a gap plus they are slower growing.
For what you want it would be best to pay the big bucks for already large spruce, there are no othe quick solutions and this applies to all evergreens, the closer you plant them together the more problems and labour is involved.
Any evergreen tree you plant will take at least one year to adapt to the new location, i.e. slow growth, often longer.
Any one selling them who tells you other wise, and there are those rare exceptions that they try to make you think are the norm, is the equivalent of a used car salesman.


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