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south-central alabama (Zone 8a)
olhippie
Mar 1, 2018 7:55 AM CST
I will be planting my field corn sometime this month and was just wondering if anyone else plants it. What few people around here plant corn, it's always sweet corn now.
Name: Paul Fish
Brownville, Nebraska (Zone 5b)
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PaulF
Mar 1, 2018 10:24 AM CST
With a few million acres of field corn planted every year in this area, there is no desire to plant field corn in my garden. My wife likes me to plant some decorative corn for fall display and if I ever get the yen to eat corn there are roadside pick-ups full of sweet corn when it is ready. No sense me taking up valuable tomato space on corn. I eat sweet corn once or twice a year and that does it for me.
south-central alabama (Zone 8a)
olhippie
Mar 1, 2018 8:04 PM CST
Around here peanuts have taken the place of corn. Not near the corn we used to plant. I'm down to just planting an acre this year, of what used to be a 20 acre field. Been down sizing the last few years. Getting older.
Name: Paul Fish
Brownville, Nebraska (Zone 5b)
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PaulF
Mar 2, 2018 8:57 AM CST
olhippie said: Getting older.


Since you use the word hippie in your name, I get from whence you come...the young whippersnappers may have heard the word. I think I sort of remember being called that in the mid and late sixties. Making tall raised beds so we don't have to bend over so much. Old age is coming at the wrong time.
Name: Ed
Crenshaw County, South Alabama (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Vegetable Grower Zinnias
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Intheswamp
Mar 3, 2018 10:02 AM CST
Being basically a rookie gardener and apparently about a decade behind the two of you, I feel like I got serious about gardening *way* too late. But, I'm not gonna let that stop me...it might hinder me a bit, but not stop me. BUT, the miles have been rough ones on the body so I'm already looking/hoping/imagining ways to lessen the burden on my body. I figure I have a few more years that I'll be able to handle the tiller (hopefully many more, but...) so if I can get the garden area nice and fertile, build some permanent beds and paths, and move to a no-till type of garden that will be great. I don't know if it'll work out that way, but for now I'm just gonna work the ground and add what I can to it. Maybe by the time I get to where I can't run the tiller the garden soil will be it such good shape that all I'll have to do is drop a pea seed on the ground and an earthworm will come up, grab it, and plant it at the proper depth for me. nodding Hilarious!

But whatever the case, I plan to enjoy being in the soil, the sun, and fresh air...and whatever the Good Lord blesses us with from the garden. It's part of the journey... Smiling
South Alabama - 8a/8b
The Enchanted Land of Humidity
www.beeweather.com
2017 Garden Photo Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsm1zSVfK
“It is difficult to produce a television documentary that is both incisive and probing when every twelve minutes one is interrupted by twelve dancing rabbits singing about toilet paper.”
― Rod Serling
Name: Ed
Crenshaw County, South Alabama (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Vegetable Grower Zinnias
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Intheswamp
Mar 3, 2018 11:09 AM CST
My post didn't address planting corn, I apologize for going off at a tangent. I haven't attempted planting any corn because I've never really known when it's "ready". I just did some googling and and here is what I think will tell me if corn is ready...silk has turned brown, shuck is still green, and pinching a kernel produces corn milk. Is that about it?
South Alabama - 8a/8b
The Enchanted Land of Humidity
www.beeweather.com
2017 Garden Photo Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsm1zSVfK
“It is difficult to produce a television documentary that is both incisive and probing when every twelve minutes one is interrupted by twelve dancing rabbits singing about toilet paper.”
― Rod Serling
Name: Dillard Haley
Augusta Georgia (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Master Level Avid Green Pages Reviewer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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farmerdill
Mar 3, 2018 11:22 AM CST
For Sweet corn. Field corn is another matter. Have not grown it since I stopped growing hogs in 1956. Farm prices were so low that many of us looked for better paying employment. Field corn you let dry in the field. In my day you used tractor drawn corn pickers. Today once over harvestors.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Mar 3, 2018 12:04 PM CST
I now put in more field corn than sweet corn in my gardens, actually has been that way for near two decades.

The people I knew who ate it are now mostly dead or moved away and I just cannot eat as much as I used to. Four cobs used to be my average, now three is usually the absolute most I will eat.

I put in field corn for decoration and for the corn stalks used as decoration. A few bushels, on the cob, is about absolute most I harvest but this year I am putting in a large amount of very tall corn because it fascinates me; a lot for decoration and for the squirrels.
My list has four sweet corns but I may cut that back.

-Eureka Ensilage
-Goliath Silo
-Boone County White
-Appalachian Heirloom Long-Eared
-Pungo Creek
-Hickory Cane Dent
-Pride of Saline Yellow
-Paraguayan Chipa Corn
Precocious Sweet
-Aunt Mary
-Buhl
-Original 8 Row Golden Bantam

Name: Ed
Crenshaw County, South Alabama (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Vegetable Grower Zinnias
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Intheswamp
Mar 3, 2018 12:22 PM CST
Yes, I'd only be interested in growing sweet corn. Plenty of folks around here still planting field corn...I think most of it grown here goes to support the poultry industry. Hogs were big around here, too, but in the '80s it seemed the bigger hog producers started shutting down. You don't really even see many small guys with 15-20 heads anymore, either.

The corn around here is meaningless compared to the corn raised in the midwest, but I guess the logistics for transportation to the poultry companies' feed mills makes it still a somewhat profitable crop for the region. Lots of peanuts, as olhippie mentioned, but not nearly as big of a crop as that used to be. The local peanut house would have trailers backed up for a quarter of a mile waiting to get hooked up to the dryers...we don't even have a local peanut house anymore. Seems it was in the 80's when the peanut crop started ebbing, too. Not near as many soybeans as it used to be, either. I can't help but raise my eyebrows, though, as it seems I'm seeing more and more of the same crop grown year-after-year on the same acreage...can't be good for the soil...my granddaddy would roll over in his grave seeing the land used like it is. Without pumping lots of chemicals to it and using gmo seed I don't think they could keep on growing profitable crops. Other than fire ants there's probably nothing living in that soil. Blinking
South Alabama - 8a/8b
The Enchanted Land of Humidity
www.beeweather.com
2017 Garden Photo Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsm1zSVfK
“It is difficult to produce a television documentary that is both incisive and probing when every twelve minutes one is interrupted by twelve dancing rabbits singing about toilet paper.”
― Rod Serling
central Illinois
Charter ATP Member Plant Database Moderator I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Avid Green Pages Reviewer Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Photo Contest Winner: 2017
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jmorth
Mar 3, 2018 12:54 PM CST
If it ain't field corn, it's soybeans; one or the other for miles and miles and miles...crop rotation is the usual practice.
It used to be that field corn picked to eat at just the right time (a minuscule minute) was good.
Sometimes farmers will plant some rows of sweet corn at the edge of some acreage close to their home.
Nothing that's been done can ever be changed.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Mar 3, 2018 2:01 PM CST
One point, field corn is not just field corn; there is dent corn, flour
corn and flint corn all are field corn but differ greatly in how they are used and genetics.

Do not grow GMO or corn with compounds of round-up type resistance incorporated.
You will be disappointed with the yield and corrupting any gardens near you with pollen drift.
Name: Ed
Crenshaw County, South Alabama (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Vegetable Grower Zinnias
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Intheswamp
Mar 3, 2018 2:33 PM CST
There is a field on our way to Greenville, Alabama, that seems to get planted with peanuts almost every year. Every few years there will be a corn crop, then back to a few years of peanuts. The peanut crops have very, very, *very* clean spaces between the rows...almost like you would envision agriculture on a distant space-lab or something...eerie. I'll watch this year and see if it's peanuts...again. It seems that most of the farmers are jumping on the RoundUp bandwagon...cotton is another good example of RoundUp-Ready crops in our area. All from the fine folks at "Big M" that brought us agent orange. What are we leaving our kids and grandkids...??? Crying
South Alabama - 8a/8b
The Enchanted Land of Humidity
www.beeweather.com
2017 Garden Photo Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsm1zSVfK
“It is difficult to produce a television documentary that is both incisive and probing when every twelve minutes one is interrupted by twelve dancing rabbits singing about toilet paper.”
― Rod Serling
south-central alabama (Zone 8a)
olhippie
Mar 3, 2018 8:07 PM CST
Field corn is all I know. I've never planted sweet corn. Been planting the same kind my whole life. Now I plant it not only to eat, but to keep the seed line going. I have no idea what the name would be. Just know I had an uncle planting it in the fifties. Paul, it has been a long time since I was called a young whippersnapper. Ed, I'm new at doing things to improve my soil. I just been putting shredded leaves in this small garden for a couple years. I'm learning a lot on these forums. Raised beds may be in my near future.
[Last edited by olhippie - Mar 3, 2018 8:40 PM (+)]
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central Illinois
Charter ATP Member Plant Database Moderator I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Avid Green Pages Reviewer Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Photo Contest Winner: 2017
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jmorth
Mar 3, 2018 9:00 PM CST
I once grew 5000 acres of seed corn.

Well, actually I was the a seed company field agent for the 5000 acres under contract. RX770 - name of the finished product. That was around 30 - 35 years ago. . Working for that seed company ignited a beginning obsession for growing plants. A spell under which, I'm happy to relate, remains with me to this very day.

I met a couple of pioneers in agronomic genetics back then.
Nothing that's been done can ever be changed.
south-central alabama (Zone 8a)
olhippie
Mar 4, 2018 7:52 AM CST
It's hard to imagine working 5000 acres. I would like to one time be able to ride in the cab of one of the big computerized tractors for one round.
Name: Ed
Crenshaw County, South Alabama (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Vegetable Grower Zinnias
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Intheswamp
Mar 4, 2018 9:56 AM CST
olhippie said:Field corn is all I know. I've never planted sweet corn. Been planting the same kind my whole life. Now I plant it not only to eat, but to keep the seed line going. I have no idea what the name would be. Just know I had an uncle planting it in the fifties. Paul, it has been a long time since I was called a young whippersnapper. Ed, I'm new at doing things to improve my soil. I just been putting shredded leaves in this small garden for a couple years. I'm learning a lot on these forums. Raised beds may be in my near future.

olhippie, field corn might be all I know, too. After thinking about it, around here folks usually get an invite from a farmer..."roastin'ears are 'bout ready, you oughta stop on your way home a get'cha some!". These are just fields growing field corn...step off the road and get a bucket full. Everynow and then there'd be somebody that had some "garden" corn...usually mentioned at a church dinner. Sticking tongue out
South Alabama - 8a/8b
The Enchanted Land of Humidity
www.beeweather.com
2017 Garden Photo Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsm1zSVfK
“It is difficult to produce a television documentary that is both incisive and probing when every twelve minutes one is interrupted by twelve dancing rabbits singing about toilet paper.”
― Rod Serling
Name: tk
murchison texas (Zone 8a)

Tomato Heads Avid Green Pages Reviewer
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texaskitty111
Mar 4, 2018 11:42 AM CST
I've heard even Amish people can't make a lliving as farmers anymore, and have moved on to other jobs. (from 90% to 10%) I find that incredibly sad, both for them, and it sort of means no hope for us home farmers. So, I've stopped trying to make money on anything I grow and just eat it.
Cauliflower is just a cabbage with a college education (mark twain)
central Illinois
Charter ATP Member Plant Database Moderator I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Plant Identifier
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Avid Green Pages Reviewer Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Photo Contest Winner: 2017
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jmorth
Mar 4, 2018 12:28 PM CST
During that summer, about the hardest part of the job was to get to work every day because the drive to the 2 counties where the corn was planted was around 75 miles. Once there I just had to verify the growers were doing their contract obligations and record corn growth stages. The growers were all familiar with the necessities of contract growing as that area specializes in crops grown for seed purposes. The contracted acreage was all under irrigation. Del Monte green beans and some other vegetables for commercial use were often just a field away. The seed company provided the de-tasseling machines.
It was an interesting experience.
You're right about the new tractors, olhippy that too would be an experience what with GPS and computer enhancements those machines practically drive themselves. The farmer can just kick back in the captain's chair and monitor.
Nothing that's been done can ever be changed.
Name: Deborah
Southern California (Zone 10a)
Rabbit Keeper
Saltflower
Mar 7, 2018 11:02 PM CST
This is a really interesting thread. I've read it more than once. A little confused though.
What's the difference between roasting corn, garden and sweet, or are they the same thing? Also, is flint corn what makes cornmeal? Or is flint the hard, dry decorative ears?
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Mar 7, 2018 11:53 PM CST
Flint -- the hard decorative ears, related to popcorn.
Flour corn is for corn meal.
Sweet corn is as it is called.
Dent corn is obviously corn where the kernels dent; some types of flour corn and flint are semi-dent.
Roasting corn is usually sweet corn but some field corns at certain stages are sweet enough at an early stage to roast or use as sweet corn.
The field corn that can be eaten is either open pollinated non-hybrid or some very old hybrids that have been around for fifty plus years.
Over at the Alan Bishop garden site there are gents who are very actively creating their own new corn crosses mixing flint, sweet, dent, flour corns.

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