Ask a Question forum: Latin word meanings

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Sidney, OH
katrific
Mar 1, 2018 12:36 PM CST
I heard there is a list/database of Latin terms here, but I have not located it on this site. I have seen mention of a list of 15,000 terms, but can not access it. I have seen Latin plant names, but that will not help with my research, so if someone can send a link or point me in the right direction I would be thankful.
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Australis
Mar 1, 2018 4:11 PM CST

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I think the 15,000 terms is referencing the dictionary:

https://garden.org/nga/diction...
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Name: Sue
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sooby
Mar 1, 2018 4:54 PM CST
Welcome!

Are you looking for something where you can enter a term and find the meaning, e.g. this one at the New York Botanical Garden:

http://sweetgum.nybg.org/scien...

Or one where you can browse a list:
http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov...

You can find others by Googling using the keywords botanical terms glossary.

If you're looking for a print book, Stearn's Botanical Latin is a standard.
Sidney, OH
katrific
Mar 1, 2018 5:16 PM CST
I am working on my list of Latin words/parts that are used in the nomenclature and I know some are missing and would like to see that type of information. Not a dictionary of botanical terms, but the prefix, suffix and other parts that make up the Genus and Specific epithet.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Mar 1, 2018 5:25 PM CST
Something like this, partly.

http://plant-phytography.blogs...

Not all botanical names are made up of these though, of course. In some cases the specific epithet is named after a person (e.g. thunbergii). I remember seeing a reference like that online years ago but I wasn't successful in finding it just now. In some cases the botanical glossary will help with the nomenclature, for example aristata means having a bristle.

If I can find that other reference, it may no longer exist, I will post a link.
Sidney, OH
katrific
Mar 2, 2018 12:58 AM CST
Thank You! sooby, that list had a few I was missing! I also want to find a few that Latinized names for animals and states/countries. Crossing Fingers!
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Leftwood
Mar 2, 2018 4:15 PM CST
Remember that Latin suffixes, especially, are gender specific and there are often singular or plural forms. (Although, nomenclature in Botanical Latin is very rarely plural.)

For a country or state, place of origin, or habitat: in general, you can add
-ensis (m.)
-ensis (f.)
-ense (n.)

or
-us (m.)
-a (f.)
-um (n.)

to the name to use it as an adjective ( for a specific epithet)
-- -- -- example: Solidago ohioensis

but I don't know the particulars of when you use which stem.


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