Bulbs forum: I've got bulbs and I've got questions

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Name: Amanda
southern Arkansas (Zone 8a)
Cat Lover Bookworm
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MarmorealArbor
Mar 1, 2018 7:20 PM CST
Hi there everyone!

I'm a relatively new (but very enthusiastic!) gardener who moved into a new home in the late summer of 2016. Last year, I planted a few annual flowers, but mostly was observing, identifying, and figuring out what in the landscape to keep and what to get rid of. This year, I want to get started in on the work of transforming my yard (ie. creating a flower-splosion Big Grin ).

On the east side of my garage, there are some irises, tuberoses (YESS!), and some mystery bulb. I don't even remember seeing it at all last year, let alone seeing it bloom! I just know it's not an iris. I think. Whatever it is, it looks crowded. Maybe someone could let me know what type of flower it might be from the leaves?

Thumb of 2018-03-02/MarmorealArbor/14af1e
Not pointy like the irises.

Then I have a couple of different kinds of daffodils - regular yellow ones and ones with a bunch of little flowers per stalk. They look really crowded, too, and I'd like to dig them up and spread them out a bit - when would be the best time to do that? After they die down in the summer, or should I wait until winter?

Thumb of 2018-03-02/MarmorealArbor/a4fa92
These little ones smell jasminey.


Thumb of 2018-03-02/MarmorealArbor/19aca2
Poor things got flattened by rain.

Thank You!
Amanda
Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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crawgarden
Mar 1, 2018 8:07 PM CST
Welcome to the site

The top pic looks like Clivias.

Best to divide bulbs after they have flowered and the leaves have died down and turned brown (do not cut the foliage) than dig and separate.
Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.
[Last edited by crawgarden - Mar 1, 2018 8:08 PM (+)]
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Name: Deborah
midstate South Carolina (Zone 8a)
Don't Sweat the Small Stuff!
Charter ATP Member Amaryllis Region: United States of America Tropicals Seed Starter Plumerias
Plant and/or Seed Trader Peonies Lilies Irises Hummingbirder Echinacea
Deebie
Mar 2, 2018 12:47 PM CST
Welcome! and congrats on your new home. Hurray! Hurray! You've come to the right place for advice regarding gardening and creating your flower-splosion. nodding

I'm too am curious about what the plants are in the 1st photo. I'd be surprised if they are clivias. They must be some spring blooming bulbous plant. We'll have a more definite ID when it blooms. You mentioned not remembering them blooming last year. Could that be because they bloom after the leaves have died down, such is the case with lycoris spider lilies, naked ladies or amaryllis belladona?

I agree with RJ about digging and transplanting after the leaves have fed the bulbs for the next season and have died down.
Name: Amanda
southern Arkansas (Zone 8a)
Cat Lover Bookworm
Image
MarmorealArbor
Mar 2, 2018 3:39 PM CST
Thank you so much @crawgarden and @deebie!

I was thinking that I could move the daffodils after the foliage dies down, thanks for confirming that. I love their blooms, but they don't do too much since they're all bunched together. There are also some wonderful little ones near my fence line - almost like miniature daffodils - that I want to bring up near the rest. I'll be doing a lot of digging! Big Grin

Speaking of digging, I've got about 17 jillion red spider lily bulbs (lycoris) scattered all over the place. I don't really like them, so I'll be digging all those up. Do y'all think that anyone might want those, or would I be better off chucking them in the compost?

Yeah, I'm really curious to see what this mystery bulb is. I don't remember it blooming last year, but then I don't remember the leaves, either. I sure didn't see anything like the clivia blooms I looked up pictures of. If it does bloom this year, I'll be sure to post a picture - and y'all can tell me what it is! Crossing Fingers!

Now off to flood the forum with the rest of my questions, ha ha! Big Grin
Name: Deborah
midstate South Carolina (Zone 8a)
Don't Sweat the Small Stuff!
Charter ATP Member Amaryllis Region: United States of America Tropicals Seed Starter Plumerias
Plant and/or Seed Trader Peonies Lilies Irises Hummingbirder Echinacea
Deebie
Mar 2, 2018 6:30 PM CST
Don't compost those spider lily bulbs. One man's junk is another man's treasure. You can use the classified forum or plant trade forum to offer them either for postage or offer to trade for something else that you would like to have. I happen to love them and would use them to plant around my trees for nice fall color, if I could get a hold of more. nodding
Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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crawgarden
Mar 2, 2018 8:02 PM CST
MarmorealArbor said:Thank you so much @crawgarden and @deebie!
Yeah, I'm really curious to see what this mystery bulb is. I don't remember it blooming last year, but then I don't remember the leaves, either. I sure didn't see anything like the clivia blooms I looked up pictures of. If it does bloom this year, I'll be sure to post a picture - and y'all can tell me what it is! Crossing Fingers!

Now off to flood the forum with the rest of my questions, ha ha! Big Grin


Amanda, since you looked up the clivic blooms and they did not look like anything you remember, could you give a description of the blooms you saw?
Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.
Name: Rick Moses
Derwood, MD (Zone 7b)
Hostas Ferns Garden Photography Plant and/or Seed Trader Forum moderator Region: United States of America
Region: Mid-Atlantic Region: Maryland Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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RickM
Mar 2, 2018 8:06 PM CST
Welcome! Welcome! Welcome!

MarmorealArbor said:
Speaking of digging, I've got about 17 jillion red spider lily bulbs (lycoris) scattered all over the place. I don't really like them, so I'll be digging all those up. Do y'all think that anyone might want those, or would I be better off chucking them in the compost?


I'll gladly take the spider lilies off your hands for postage! I've been wanting them for years, but just never get around to getting them.

Name: Neal Linville
Winchester, KY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Bulbs Cottage Gardener Roses Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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gemini_sage
Mar 3, 2018 4:58 AM CST
Welcome! Amanda!

I think your mystery bulb foliage may be Surprise Lilies, the leaves strongly resemble mine. They're called Surprise Lilies because after the leaves die back in late spring, the naked bloom stalks arise very suddenly in late summer- they seem to appear over night! They tend to bloom well when crowded, and have a tendency to sulk and produce no blooms for a year or so after being divided, so you may want to wait and see if they bloom this summer before dividing the bulbs. Here are photos of the blooms and one of foliage for comparison:


I agree with others that you should offer your red spider lilies for trade. They're fairly pricey from bulb vendors, so I imagine other gardeners will be thrilled to have some (if they were hardy here, I know I would!).
"...and don't think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter. It's quiet, but the roots are down there riotous." Rumi
Name: Nancy
Bowling Green Kentucky (Zone 6b)
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alilyfan
Mar 3, 2018 10:14 AM CST
I was just going to say what Neal already said, mine are up now too. They multiply very fast. Maybe they were just planted a couple of years ago? Like Neal said, they don't bloom for a year after they are divided.
Name: Amanda
southern Arkansas (Zone 8a)
Cat Lover Bookworm
Image
MarmorealArbor
Mar 3, 2018 10:59 AM CST
@crawgarden I don't remember even seeing any foliage last year where the mystery bulbs are, much less flowers! I mean, there must've been, but I sure don't remember seeing anything but the irises and tuberoses. That's why I'm super curious now to see what they are. Big Grin

@gemini_sage Oooh, wow, those pink lilies are gorgeous! I'm definitely going to wait and see what they do before I go trying to move them. It's funny, though - down here the red spider lilies are called 'surprise lilies.' And they grow like weeds! I didn't know they were sold at all. Here, they're kind of like fruitcake - everybody's always trying to give them to someone else. :P

@alilyfan I'm hoping that they might be those lovely pink surprise lilies. I'd resigned myself to not being able to grow any lilies since lilies are so super toxic to cats - as much as I love flowers, my babies are more important! It only seems to be true lilies that are toxic, though - I can't find anything on any of the lycoris being harmful. So yay! Hurray!

Thank you all so much, and I'll keep you updated on what's going on in the bulb patch! nodding
Name: Neal Linville
Winchester, KY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Bulbs Cottage Gardener Roses Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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gemini_sage
Mar 3, 2018 12:09 PM CST
It sounds about right that the red spider lilies would also be called surprise lilies, they're in the same genus as the pink ones and have the same habit of arising quickly with no foliage present.

I've read that true lilies are toxic to cats, but I think that's only a problem with house cats being exposed to a potted lily indoors. House cats are often drawn to chew on various kinds of plants since there's no grass to chew. I've always had cats, both indoors and out, but none have ever touched any of my lilies in the garden. I think they prefer grass and seem to instinctively avoid toxic plants in nature.
"...and don't think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter. It's quiet, but the roots are down there riotous." Rumi
Name: Nancy
Bowling Green Kentucky (Zone 6b)
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alilyfan
Mar 3, 2018 5:56 PM CST
I've always had cats, and many, many lilies. Never have I seen a cat nibble on a lily, or any other toxic plant I might grow. My neighbor's cat is determined to nap in the middle of my day lilies, and may find that bad for her health one of these days. She has survived so far because she is so sweet
Name: Amanda
southern Arkansas (Zone 8a)
Cat Lover Bookworm
Image
MarmorealArbor
Mar 4, 2018 10:40 AM CST
My cats are strictly indoor, but I'm kinda paranoid that I'd maybe forget to wash my hands after messing with lilies or something and make one of them sick. I guess something like that isn't very likely though. Cats inside, lilies outside, and never the twain shall meet!

The storm right now has probably got them smushed flat to the ground, but yesterday when I was outside, I took some pictures of this little guy. I just can't get over those adorable flowers! Lovey dubby Does anyone know what sort of daffodil this is?


Thumb of 2018-03-04/MarmorealArbor/1c3fba

Name: Neal Linville
Winchester, KY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Bulbs Cottage Gardener Roses Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
gemini_sage
Mar 4, 2018 10:54 AM CST
I think it is likely to be Avalanche. Often called "Seventeen Sisters"
"...and don't think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter. It's quiet, but the roots are down there riotous." Rumi
Name: Amanda
southern Arkansas (Zone 8a)
Cat Lover Bookworm
Image
MarmorealArbor
Mar 4, 2018 11:13 AM CST
Thank You!
Name: Kabby
Lowndesboro, AL (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Region: United States of America Bookworm Echinacea Seed Starter Region: Alabama
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Kabby
Mar 10, 2018 6:07 PM CST
Amanda I would for sure say that your foliage belongs to lycoris squamigera. I also am in zone 8a and the foliage is up here also. They don't bloom every year, even when the leaves come up like this.
You 've got a gold mine on the red spider lilies for trading or selling. Bulb catalogs charge alot.
Name: Amanda
southern Arkansas (Zone 8a)
Cat Lover Bookworm
Image
MarmorealArbor
Mar 11, 2018 1:08 AM CST
That's so crazy to me - they are *really* widespread all around southwest Arkansas. I've got a big cardboard box full of them in the garage that's been there since last summer D'Oh! and hundreds more to dig out of my yard. They're almost weedy here!

Somebody needs to come down here, dig them all up, and make their fortune! Hilarious!
(Zone 8b)
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sallysmom
Mar 11, 2018 6:25 AM CST
Daffodils can be moved "in the green". Most growers do that now anyway. If you do this, just make sure to take a lot of the surrounding soil & try not to disturb the roots.

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