Vegetables and Fruit forum: Sium sisarum (skirret, crummock) - anyone growing / eating?

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Name: UrbanWild
Kentucky (Zone 6b)
Kentucky - borderline of 6a & 6b
Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Native Plants and Wildflowers Miniature Gardening Organic Gardener Frogs and Toads Dog Lover
Birds Vegetable Grower Spiders! Hummingbirder Butterflies Critters Allowed
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UrbanWild
Mar 4, 2018 2:22 PM CST
Has anyone grown and/or eaten skirret? Thoughts?
Always looking for interesting plants for pollinators and food! Bonus points for highly, and pleasantly scented plants.

"Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, nihil deerit." [“If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”] -- Marcus Tullius Cicero in Ad Familiares IX, 4, to Varro. 46 BCE
[Last edited by UrbanWild - Mar 4, 2018 3:39 PM (+)]
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Name: Dillard Haley
Augusta Georgia (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Master Level Avid Green Pages Reviewer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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farmerdill
Mar 4, 2018 2:53 PM CST
Never tried it. More popular in Europe. I have seen seeds advertised by British vendors. A cousin of the carrot with sweet flavored white roots That grow in a spread like sweet potatoes but small. Supposedly small yield and labor intensive prep have kept it from the commercial market.
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Mar 12, 2018 2:09 PM CST
I've never heard of them, but from Farmerdill's description, they sound simmalar to a parsnip.
Parsinip's are white, and grow big as carrots. Have there own unique mild flavor, when they mature in cool weather. When matured in warm weather, they can be bitter.
I'm gonna go look them up.
Thanks 👍
😎😎😎
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.

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