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Name: Edgar Duarte
Holland
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GreenPlant
Mar 7, 2018 2:09 AM CST
Hello, I have this cactus for more then ten years, it has been surviving the winters outside, but unfortunately last week the temperature went a bit too low, I forgot to take it inside and when I noticed it was like this. Is it possible to get it back? Even if I could get a small part of it I would be already happy to make it grow again. Can someone give me a help here?
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Name: 'CareBear'

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Stush2019
Mar 7, 2018 12:23 PM CST
Keep it dry and in a sunny spot. It may pick back up. I have some hardy paddle cactus that during winter they completely dry up and look dead. Then when the sun comes out and it warms up, they plump right back up. If only once you might have a chance.
Name: Edgar Duarte
Holland
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GreenPlant
Mar 7, 2018 2:36 PM CST
That sounds like there is light at the end of the tunnel. Thanks for the good news
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Mar 9, 2018 10:29 AM CST
Hello Edgar, for me as long as I still see something green on my succulents undergoing stress I do not give up yet. You can do as Stush suggested. Give it time to adjust from that cold exposure, and try to feel the rest of the plant, if the stem all the way to the base touching the soil is still holding firm, there may still be hope.

Or as back-up, sterilize a knife and cut off that branching one, let it callus, keep it warm, give access to bright light, not direct sun yet, and continue to keep dry then stick back into well draining soil or cactus soil. Use a smaller container with drain holes. It will have no roots yet, so just leave it alone and allow the plant to grow new roots. It is not a quick a process since cacti is typically such a slow grower. Be very patient. You may have to stake the plant for awhile to help it anchor itself properly. When your outdoor temperatures stabilizes a bit more, nothing lower than 10C (50F) overnight, you can gradually bring it out so it can naturally experience the outdoors again.

In the meantime, continue nurturing mother plant, with one less branch it can concentrate/focus its energies for its own. On the site where you did the cut, you can dab just a little cinnamon as an anti-fungal measure.

Good luck, hope your plant recovers! Keep us posted as it goes! Smiling

Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Mar 9, 2018 11:19 AM CST
I'm not sure exactly what kind of cactus it is. Maybe a Cholla? My Cholla go completely limp in winter but perk back up when the weather gets warm.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Edgar Duarte
Holland
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GreenPlant
Mar 10, 2018 2:18 AM CST
It seems to be some kind of Austrocylindropuntia, I was inspecting it again now and it seems to have some ruptures along its skin, wonder how bad that looks. On the picture where I show the scissors, is there the right spot to cut in order to try to make another one?
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Mar 10, 2018 10:52 AM CST
You are showing a bad spot on one of the tips and where the bend is. It may be too late to take a cutting as the cutting needs to be free of any brown in the center - cactus are green in the middle.

But where ever you decide to cut, scissors are the wrong choice of 'surgical implement'. I really sharp knife is the right choice. Remember to sterilize your knife with alcohol after every cut so you don't spread the rot.

How firm and how much damage do you see on the pot side of the bend? It may be that only the top is dying.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Thijs van Soest
Mesa, AZ (Zone 9b)
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mcvansoest
Mar 10, 2018 12:29 PM CST
I think the plant might be done, but if you do want to give it a shot make the cut with a sterilized knife like Daisy suggests about 3-4 cm below the branch. If you see nice healthy flesh, it may survive. If not you have to keep cutting lower and lower towards the soil level until you find no more evidence of mush/rot.

Keep it in a warm dry place with good light and do not water for a good while. The cut should dry out and may eventually sprout new growth.
Name: Edgar Duarte
Holland
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GreenPlant
Mar 11, 2018 1:00 AM CST
Okay, so if I am getting it well, I will cut a bit under where the small side branch is. There it feels stronger because it has a grey rougher skin instead of green. So it will be a very short cactus which is okay as long as it survives, so the plan is that it can recover from the open cut on the top and maybe he will produce new side branches one day? I will make a picture of the top cut and ask for advice if I should go deeper.

Then at the same time the small branch I will try to repot it just in case, with a supporting stick, should i repot the complete small branch close to the main stem or cut it more further in the middle? Sorry to annoy you guys much with this, I just want to be sure I do this in the best way.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Mar 11, 2018 2:13 AM CST
Leave the branch cutting as large as possible. Use a very sharp knife (you don't want to damage any more tissue than you need to). After you cut, look for brown, that is an indication of rot. Sterilize your knife between cuts so you don't spread the rot. Let the cutting sit for a couple weeks or more in a shady but warm spot to allow the cut end to dry and scab over. If you end up with a center cut, make sure you know which end is up (make an arrow with a felt tip marker). When you 'plant', use barely moist soil and prop the end up with sticks so it can't move. You can firm the end down but don't bury it. Then, don't water. Be patient.

The survival of the 'parent' plant is dependent upon if the root is rotted or not. You will figure that out if you cut all the way to pot level and still see brown tissue.

Good luck and keep us posted!
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Edgar Duarte
Holland
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GreenPlant
Mar 11, 2018 8:40 AM CST
Okay so, barely moist soil, means normal plant soil and not cactus specific soil? As I was going to buy that today.

So i can cut the small branch in two places and the lower cut I stick it in the soil and the upper cut edge open to the air? Didn't know that was possible.
Name: Thijs van Soest
Mesa, AZ (Zone 9b)
Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Bee Lover Bookworm Adeniums Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Cactus and Succulents Container Gardener Hummingbirder Xeriscape Region: Arizona Region: Southwest Gardening
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mcvansoest
Mar 11, 2018 10:12 AM CST
Just to be clear unless the picture's color is really off. The dark green bits are that color because they were previously frozen and on their way to rot. I am hoping you can save the base of the plant...

This plant indeed looks like Austrocylindropuntia subulata, and those are not healthy when that dark green. One way to check it is to cut in the dark part and see what the inside looks like. I suspect it will be all mushy...
Name: Edgar Duarte
Holland
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GreenPlant
Mar 11, 2018 10:36 AM CST
I really want to do the cut but first i just want to be sure about what is the best thing to do with the remain of it.
Name: Edgar Duarte
Holland
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GreenPlant
Mar 11, 2018 1:32 PM CST
Enough talk, time for some action in this post. I never cut a cactus before so... is this mushy?
The outer inside green ring feels soft and jelly but the white inside was quite hard to cut it. The smell is not so good by the way.
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Name: Edgar Duarte
Holland
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GreenPlant
Mar 11, 2018 1:45 PM CST
More action in here, I got this two pieces which look okay... I think...
So now I keep this two pieces just like this in the shady place and only after a week I stick them in the sand right?
Well I will show a picture of them in almost one week time anyway.
Thank you guys. Please let me know what you think.
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Mar 11, 2018 2:07 PM CST
I don't see much hope for any of your pieces. Crying
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Edgar Duarte
Holland
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GreenPlant
Mar 11, 2018 2:25 PM CST
What about the white hard inner material from the main one from the pot? Looks healthy... or not?

It's only a bit soft around it so maybe...
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Mar 11, 2018 2:34 PM CST
Think of a tree. If you peel off the bark, the tree will die. You can try it but don't get your hopes up.

Go back and re-read my last night's post on time it takes to scab over and potting. And yes, cactus mix with added perlite or pumice.

Sorry for the poor prediction.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Edgar Duarte
Holland
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GreenPlant
Mar 12, 2018 2:42 PM CST
Okay okay, I get the point, but hope is the last thing to die, I will give it at least six months and then will see.
Thank you people. I will keep this posted.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Mar 12, 2018 4:17 PM CST
Thumbs up
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org

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