All Things Gardening forum: Is Lemon plant dead?

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planthelpme
Mar 7, 2018 8:56 PM CST
All leaves facing up. Control temperature 25-30 C.
Humid around 80%
Leaves feel rough paper.
Thumb of 2018-03-08/planthelpme/dcfa24

Under LED grow lights, PH around 7.5
Soil is wet,

Please help. All new leaves came around 1.5 months back, they facing up as you can see. Uploaded high qty photo, I think you can zoom further if needed.

Thanks
[Last edited by planthelpme - Mar 7, 2018 8:57 PM (+)]
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planthelpme
Mar 7, 2018 9:02 PM CST
Here is a link to full size photo for closer look.
image.ibb.co/gDD9Sn/IMG_3760_1.jpg

planthelpme
Mar 7, 2018 9:09 PM CST
Here is a crop photo of the leaves.
Thumb of 2018-03-08/planthelpme/a2565d

Hope this provides more info.
Name: Frank Mosher
Nova Scotia, Canada (Zone 6a)
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fwmosher
Mar 7, 2018 9:32 PM CST
I don't see anything wrong with your lemon tree. Is it the course leaves you are concerned about? The leaves look perfect, no sign of any chemical imbalance. With my lime trees, the only time I get in trouble is when I fail to give the plant including the rootball, a good sustained watering. Surface dampness means very little. See if you can find one of those dampness-test gizmos in your local $dollarama or equivalent, and check the bottom for wetness, AT THE BOTTOM OF THE POT.Cheers!

planthelpme
Mar 8, 2018 5:26 PM CST
fwmosher said:I don't see anything wrong with your lemon tree. Is it the course leaves you are concerned about? The leaves look perfect, no sign of any chemical imbalance. With my lime trees, the only time I get in trouble is when I fail to give the plant including the rootball, a good sustained watering. Surface dampness means very little. See if you can find one of those dampness-test gizmos in your local $dollarama or equivalent, and check the bottom for wetness, AT THE BOTTOM OF THE POT.Cheers!


Yes, I am using meter for light, water & PH.

Water reading shows 100% level.

Any other suggestion.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
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WillC
Mar 9, 2018 11:26 AM CST
Citrus trees require a great deal of direct sunlight and I don't think your LED's are fully up to the task. A sunny windowsill would be far better. It appears that the leaves are stretching and orienting to maximize their exposure to the light, which I assume is overhead.

Citrus trees need a mildly acidic soil of about 6.0 pH; 7.5 is much too high, assuming your pH guage is accurate.

Don't rely on a water meter as they are notoriously inaccurate and can fluctuate wildly with the soil quality, including pH. The pot is very large for the root system, so there is a greater risk of the soil staying moist for too long and suffocating the roots. Allow the top half-inch of soil to feel dry to the touch before adding just enough water so that it reaches that level of dryness again in about a week. Adjust the volume of water you add accordingly.
Will Creed
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Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Mar 9, 2018 11:44 AM CST
Hello planthelpme, to me it just looks like it is adjusting to the limited light it gets. It thrives much better with full sun, lots of light. If temps are higher, more water, if temps are lower lesser watering, but in both cases sustained light access.

Looking at your plant, the stems look good, I like seeing that greenish hue on the bark of the branches and stem, Just be patient, it may also just be transitioning its leaves. It does that as it prepares to redirect its energies to other new growth like flowers or maybe newer leaves.
Name: Frank Mosher
Nova Scotia, Canada (Zone 6a)
Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Birds Roses Clematis Lilies Peonies
Region: Canadian Photo Contest Winner: 2017 Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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fwmosher
Mar 9, 2018 11:54 AM CST
Planthelpme: I do have another two suggestions. #1. No sense caring for a plant if it is dead, and with citrus, it is difficult to tell sometimes, (as I am wondering about my Persian Lime, and always wonder about my many Bouganvilleas-all under Reg/T8/LED lights in Winter-going into 7th. year) so I recommend that you carefully loosen the plant in your pot, and using a garbage bag as a protective surface, gently lift the plant out. If you do not see any white growing roots, (and you can use your hands to disturb the rootball a little, then the odds are that the plant maybe, maybe, deceased. (Not funny, but I keep thinking of the "Monty Python Dead Parrot skit) #2. Just to make certain, either before or after you check the roots, take a pair of shears or kitchen scissors and cut off a couple limbs somewhere, one low, and one intermediate, and if there is no "green" in the pith, and no colour anywhere, the conclusion is obvious. I am the last person in the World to give a "shovel prune" decree on a plant, I assure you. Hope you find some positive results!! Please keep us informed. Cheers.
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
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tarev
Mar 9, 2018 12:28 PM CST
Hello planthelpme, see if this photos will help you. My citrus plant is a calamondin, not lemon, but they do share similar growth habits. In summer of 2016, I have no choice but to be away for more than a month, so when I returned, my poor calamondin was looking dead as a door nail:

My calamondin in April 2016, happily making flowers:
Thumb of 2018-03-09/tarev/c95b58

My calamondin, summer August 2016, too heartbreakingly dead looking:
Thumb of 2018-03-09/tarev/6c36c8
branches visually looking so brittle and dead too:
Thumb of 2018-03-09/tarev/432881

I was at my wit's end, so what I did was resume watering and hope for the best, season's were changing so our horrendous triple digit temps are normalizing to more favorable low 80F's:
New hope showed up near the base of the trunk in Oct 2016
Thumb of 2018-03-09/tarev/2ffa8b
Growth improved further early Nov 2016
Thumb of 2018-03-09/tarev/671462

So to my eyes, is your Lemon plant dead, not at all. It is in seasonal adjustment stage. Even the photos of your branches and trunk displays that nice greenish bark color. So the plant is still relatively okay. Do not be tempted though to fertilize right now. It is in some light access stress. Wait till the warmer Spring to Summer condiions becomes more established.

planthelpme
Apr 1, 2018 6:15 PM CST
Thanks Guys :)

I have moved it outside as weather is not freezing.
BTW, It's Meyer Lemon.

About a week now, leaves still facing up, lets see.
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Apr 3, 2018 9:28 AM CST
@planthelpme, I sure hope your lemon plant revives and thrives. Good luck.

@tarev,
Very inspirational; please consider posting about your experience with this plant in the thread here:
The thread "Never Lose Hope ... with Gardening (in the title) 😉" in All Things Gardening forum
:thankyou:
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"

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