Plant ID forum: Plant ID: Urban Ecology

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Melbourne, VIC, AUS
DRUS
Mar 8, 2018 6:20 AM CST
Hello everyone,

I have a few plants within an urban ecosystem that need identifying. I have a project focusing on these species and protecting this unique environment. The largest species has been the hardest to identify. It seems like its an heptapleurum or something similar but I don't think it is.

Other species I have identified are Parietaria Judaica, Foeniculum and Taraxacum.

Thanks in advance!
Hurray!
Thumb of 2018-03-08/DRUS/fb334e
Thumb of 2018-03-08/DRUS/cb0ab4
Thumb of 2018-03-08/DRUS/8da6c4

Perthshire. SCOTLAND. UK
Region: United Kingdom Plant Identifier
Image
Silversurfer
Mar 8, 2018 1:57 PM CST
I am confused.
Are all 3 images from the same plant?
Please can you add very clear close ups...of just one shrub.
Details of any flowers/fruits/berries is always helpful.
Not of these are Schefflera/heptapleurum as far as I can see.

Attention: start a new thread for each plant that you need identified!
[Last edited by Silversurfer - Mar 8, 2018 1:59 PM (+)]
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Melbourne, VIC, AUS
DRUS
Mar 8, 2018 5:47 PM CST
Silversurfer said:I am confused.
Are all 3 images from the same plant?
Please can you add very clear close ups...of just one shrub.
Details of any flowers/fruits/berries is always helpful.
Not of these are Schefflera/heptapleurum as far as I can see.

Attention: start a new thread for each plant that you need identified!


Hello Silversurfer,

Thanks for your reply. This is my first post and I am new to this, sorry If I caused confusion. I am trying to identify the large shrub.

The first images I am trying to show the trunks of this species. They seem to have a strappy and open form. Trunks can get fairly thick though.

The second image I am showing that these small trees can grow almost anywhere, in cracks and crevices. There is also a close up of that specimen with small seeds.

The third image shows its bushier habit and a close up of the foliage.

They are the best I can provide as the site has been developed and unfortunately the species no longer exist there.

Thanks again.
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
ViburnumValley
Mar 8, 2018 8:35 PM CST
I don't recognize anything you've provided so far, but - I agree with the sentiments provided by Silversurfer: provide more information!

Despite the site being developed, and original plants destroyed, your description tells me that this species likely exists in a lot of other places from which you can provide more of the information that has been requested.

Show the whole plant(s).

Show more details, including closeups of individual leaves, the leaf arrangement along stems, flowers, fruits, buds, leaf scars, bud scars, lenticels, and every other kind of botanical ID feature that can be photographed.

Thank you in advance! I have only had the pleasure of visiting your country once before, and I only traveled around and was amazed by the botanical wonders found in Queensland. I hope to visit Australia again, because as you know, there are limitless experiences to be had - botanically and otherwise.
John
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Mar 8, 2018 10:00 PM CST
Also, no "implant" photos. You are not restricted to the number of photos you can post so please take advantage of that. Smiling
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Melbourne, VIC, AUS
DRUS
Mar 9, 2018 11:56 PM CST
Hello everyone,

Thanks for your responses. Unfortunately we are a bit limited. I can't seem to find this plant anywhere. Luckily I took some plant matter and kept it in Jars. I do not have the jars but I have photos of them.

Maybe this will help to show more detail.

Cheers!



Thumb of 2018-03-10/DRUS/836500
Thumb of 2018-03-10/DRUS/b28571
Thumb of 2018-03-10/DRUS/0182a0
Thumb of 2018-03-10/DRUS/67a44a
Thumb of 2018-03-10/DRUS/332af0

Melbourne, VIC, AUS
DRUS
Mar 10, 2018 12:10 AM CST
Hey everyone,

Just a few more things.

From closer inspection of the jar, the specimen seems to have had yellow flowers (I think) that look similar to a Correa. Leaves seem to be elliptic in shape with an entire margin. Possibly Pinnate venation. Fruits (depicted in second image in first post) are round and I think dark yellow. Hope that helps.
Perthshire. SCOTLAND. UK
Region: United Kingdom Plant Identifier
Image
Silversurfer
Mar 10, 2018 3:42 AM CST
ViburnumValley said:

Despite the site being developed, and original plants destroyed, your description tells me that this species likely exists in a lot of other places from which you can provide more of the information that has been requested.

Show the whole plant(s).

Show more details, including closeups of individual leaves, the leaf arrangement along stems, flowers, fruits, buds, leaf scars, bud scars, lenticels, and every other kind of botanical ID feature that can be photographed.

.


Sorry but a plant squashed in a jar does not help me at all.
I do not understand......Why on earth would you do that????
In future please look for more of this shrub and do as Viburnum Valley suggests.

Melbourne, VIC, AUS
DRUS
Mar 12, 2018 1:40 AM CST
Silversurfer said:

Sorry but a plant squashed in a jar does not help me at all.
I do not understand......Why on earth would you do that????
In future please look for more of this shrub and do as Viburnum Valley suggests.



Hi again Silversurfer,

I'm not sure what you mean? These photos were taken about 5 years ago and I do not have contact with this species anymore. This wasn't yesterday.

Why wouldn't I have take a portion of a plant I was trying to identify?
If I could find this now we would have been able to identify it surely.

These images should help more because it shows a closer detail of the foliage and also some flowers. There are images showing flowers, fruits, foliage and 2 different whole plant structures/habits.

I think the main issues are:
1. Photos are old and not 100% clear.
2. Cannot find this species again.
3. This isn't a very common species that people plant in their gardens, making it hard to identify.

Looks like no one can help to identify this plant.
Sighing!

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