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Avatar for MM96
Mar 10, 2018 11:26 PM CST

I recently came home from a trip to find my friend who was in charge of watering my plants while I was away over watered my Hawarthia that I have had for years, it was one of my oldest plants and beautiful so I don't want to lose it. Is there a way I can propagate with cuttings that don't have roots? Most of the roots rotted but it luckily did not spread to the leaves of the plant, I couldn't save any roots on most of the cuttings I was able to get, and the ones that do have them are very small and weak looking.
Please tell me if anyone knows a way to save my plant? I will be very sad to lose this one if not ):
Thanks.
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Mar 11, 2018 1:45 AM CST
Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Cactus and Succulents Sempervivums Bromeliad Adeniums Bookworm Sedums
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Best bet is to cover the cut part with cinnamon, let it callous, and place it in soil. Dont know how well it works, , for me 6 out of 11 attempts were successful(but mostly with aloe, not haworthia/haworthopsis)
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Mar 11, 2018 2:20 AM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Welcome!

Are you trying to root a single leaf? Or a rosette? Maybe a photo will help.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Avatar for MM96
Mar 11, 2018 2:23 PM CST

DaisyI said: Welcome!

Are you trying to root a single leaf? Or a rosette? Maybe a photo will help.


I am trying to root a rosette.
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Mar 11, 2018 2:31 PM CST
Moderator
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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If there is no rot in the stem, you should be good to go. Get rid of the old soil and bleach the container if you want to use it again with this plant. Or find a pot that's wider than deep, with holes at the bottom, that's just a bit bigger than the rosette. Use soil for cacti (bagged cactus mix) or use regular potting soil mixed with an equal volume of pumice, perlite, or equivalent. Put the cutting on top of the soil without burying any leaves and with very little stem buried. Put the pot in bright light (indoors that would be by a sunny windowsill) and wait a week to water. Then water well and from there on out only water when the soil is dry at depth (not just the very top layer). This will depend on light and temperature and humidity, since evaporation is the only way the water will leave the container until the plant starts drinking. When you see new growth on top you have a very good indicator that the roots have sprouted and are working.
Last edited by Baja_Costero Mar 11, 2018 2:32 PM Icon for preview
Avatar for MM96
Mar 11, 2018 2:44 PM CST

skopjecollection said:Best bet is to cover the cut part with cinnamon, let it callous, and place it in soil. Dont know how well it works, , for me 6 out of 11 attempts were successful(but mostly with aloe, not haworthia/haworthopsis)


Why Cinnamon? I don't think I have ever heard of that.
Thanks for the advice.
Avatar for MM96
Mar 11, 2018 2:49 PM CST

Baja_Costero said:If there is no rot in the stem, you should be good to go. Get rid of the old soil and bleach the container if you want to use it again with this plant. Or find a pot that's wider than deep, with holes at the bottom, that's just a bit bigger than the rosette. Use soil for cacti (bagged cactus mix) or use regular potting soil mixed with an equal volume of pumice, perlite, or equivalent. Put the cutting on top of the soil without burying any leaves and with very little stem buried. Put the pot in bright light (indoors that would be by a sunny windowsill) and wait a week to water. Then water well and from there on out only water when the soil is dry at depth (not just the very top layer). This will depend on light and temperature and humidity, since evaporation is the only way the water will leave the container until the plant starts drinking. When you see new growth on top you have a very good indicator that the roots have sprouted and are working.


Thank you for this very informative answer, this is very helpful and I'm hopeful this info will help me save my plant.
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Mar 11, 2018 4:46 PM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Cinnamon is a natural fungicide and, if parts of a plant are rotting (I've also used it to kill the roots of those annoying yellow mushrooms that grow in potting soil), that would do the trick. But, cactus and succulents don't play by the same rules. Simply removing rot and letting the pieces air dry will be of more benefit that treating with cinnamon.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Avatar for Growmore
Mar 11, 2018 5:10 PM CST
United Kingdom
Prepare a seed tray of compost a bit on the gritty side. Peat & verniculate is good. or a peaty compost and sharp sand. Soak it and let it drain. Now select/salvage leaves or stem parts. Cut away and discard rotted portions. Select and cut into portions of about 1.5 inches. Gently press the cutting into the compost. If you are using a propagator cove but leave the vents open. In hot sunlit areas, a bit of shading will prevent th compost drying out. Soon yo will have rooted cuttings.
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