Ask a Question forum: Moro beans

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Name: Nita Porterfield
Boerne, Texas (Zone 8b)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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shaggya
Mar 25, 2018 2:08 PM CST
Has anyone grown moro beans? They are, apparantly, a somewhat rare, heirloom bean. I got them in the D&D seed swap but I don't remember who they came from. I have searched all over Google. I need to know if this is a pole bean or a bush bean. I suspect that it is a pole bean. If anyone has any information on growing these beans I would appreciate hearing from you. Thanks so much.

Anita Porterfield
Boerne, Texas
"In spring, at the end of the day you should smell like dirt." -- Margaret Atwood
Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Mar 25, 2018 5:04 PM CST
I've never heard of Moro Bean but found this site: https://www.ranchogordo.com/pr... stating that Moro Beans are a cross between a Pinto Bean and Black Bean.

Here are two varieties of Phaseolus vulgaris in our database:
Dry Shelling Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris 'Pinto')
Dry Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris 'Black Turtle Soup')

I'm assuming that Moro Beans should be grown the same way as Pinto's and
Black Beans. This site has pages with growing information on both:
Pinto Beans: http://www.heirloom-organics.c...
Black Beans: http://www.heirloom-organics.c...

~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


Name: Nita Porterfield
Boerne, Texas (Zone 8b)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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shaggya
Mar 25, 2018 6:36 PM CST
Thanks so much for answering my question and answering so quickly. That's my instinct, too. But as a long-time grower of heirloom beans, I have grown pinto bush, pole, and half-runner. There are a couple of varieties of bush black beans. I think that Rancho Gordo was talking about the way they taste. The black turtle soup beans are generally tepary beans. I only have 6 beans, so I am trying every way I know how to figure out what to do so that I don't kill my beans. Thank You! Smiling Acorn
"In spring, at the end of the day you should smell like dirt." -- Margaret Atwood
Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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Yardenman
Mar 26, 2018 2:16 AM CST
shaggya said:Thanks so much for answering my question and answering so quickly. That's my instinct, too. But as a long-time grower of heirloom beans, I have grown pinto bush, pole, and half-runner. There are a couple of varieties of bush black beans. I think that Rancho Gordo was talking about the way they taste. The black turtle soup beans are generally tepary beans. I only have 6 beans, so I am trying every way I know how to figure out what to do so that I don't kill my beans. Thank You! Smiling Acorn


I found the same sites. Basically, presoak any bean seeds a few hours and plant them in soft soil an inch deep. They will grow.

If you want to collect dried seeds, you won't get a whole lot. Most pole beans stop producing when there are ripe ones on the vines.

Name: Nita Porterfield
Boerne, Texas (Zone 8b)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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shaggya
Mar 26, 2018 5:42 AM CST
Thanks. And they stop when it gets really hot, so I have a relatively short window. Thanks so much for your help. Thank You!
"In spring, at the end of the day you should smell like dirt." -- Margaret Atwood
Kamogawa, Chiba, Japan (Zone 9a)
nytrist
Jul 23, 2018 11:33 PM CST
Hi everyone,
How did the moro beans go? We've planted some also and I haven't found any info on growing / harvesting them either. Would love to hear your experience :)
Name: Nita Porterfield
Boerne, Texas (Zone 8b)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
shaggya
Jul 25, 2018 12:53 PM CST
Germination was difficult but finally a couple germinated and have been quite robust. We have had a brutal summer with numerous triple digit days. They have not shown any signs of stress but, like most beans, have produced flowers but no beans. The only legumes in our garden that have been producing copious quantities of beans are pink-eye purple pea and red noodle beans. Calima, purple, and yellow wax beans have produced limited amounts. Orcas failed. Smiling
"In spring, at the end of the day you should smell like dirt." -- Margaret Atwood

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