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Avatar for NewbieGardner
Mar 31, 2018 4:54 PM CST
Seattle, WA (Zone 8b)
Each year My tea hybrid Rose plants gets affected by Aphids in Spring. Though I spray insecticide it haven't solved the problem. Can someone guide me how can I save my plants from getting aphids in spring.
Avatar for porkpal
Mar 31, 2018 5:01 PM CST
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX (Zone 9a)
Cat Lover Charter ATP Member Keeper of Poultry I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Dog Lover Keeps Horses
Roses Plant Identifier Farmer Raises cows Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Ideas: Level 2
All I can suggest is to stay alert and wash the little pests with a spray from the hose as soon as you see them.
Porkpal
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Mar 31, 2018 5:25 PM CST
Name: Frank Mosher
Nova Scotia, Canada (Zone 6a)
Birds Region: Canadian Clematis Lilies Peonies Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Roses Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Photo Contest Winner: 2017
I have a problem with the theory that one should just use a hose to spray off aphids. You are not "killing" same, but just washing them off to come back again. One should use a MILD dish soap/water spray. As such, the soapy foam clogs their lungs. History! If you don't feel comfortable making your own spray, SAFER has an excellent aphid spray, but as with all sprays, use it early in the morning or in the late afternoon, not during hot sun. And yes, you do have to examine your HT's once a week for certain. Worth the effort! Cheers
Avatar for porkpal
Mar 31, 2018 6:33 PM CST
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX (Zone 9a)
Cat Lover Charter ATP Member Keeper of Poultry I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Dog Lover Keeps Horses
Roses Plant Identifier Farmer Raises cows Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Ideas: Level 2
Aphids will not come back: they are not that mobile - oh, and they have no lungs.
Porkpal
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Apr 1, 2018 12:55 PM CST
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Irises Lilies Roses Region: Southwest Gardening
There are lots of strongly held opinions about aphids and ways to get rid of them. It seems to me that the most important thing to do is to examine your roses daily, looking most closely at buds and other new growth. And, on finding aphids, to wash them off.

I tend to use spot treatment of aphids with a soapy solution because I get some satisfaction of watching the little insects suffocate as the soapy solution clogs their trachae in a way that plain water does not. They tend to drop from the plant and I feel assured they will never return. But if your whole rose plant is covered with aphids, it's almost certainly better for the plant to spray them off with a high pressure (garden hose with a nozzle) spray of plain water, as soap solutions can cause plants to lose moisture faster than plain water will.

Regarding pesticides, they can seem like a good idea until one considers that most pests such as aphids are food for predators such as praying mantis and ladybugs. When these predators are killed by eating pests treated with pesticides, they can die too. Because the life cycle for pests is so much shorter than it is for their predators, this can mean that the aphids reproduce much faster. With predators gone, they become a problem faster than before pesticides were introduced. Because of this there are cases where the use of pesticides can acually increase the number of aphids in a garden. Many serious gardeners here have serious reservations about using them, especially in some broad, blanketing way.
When you dance with nature, try not to step on her toes.
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