Ask a Question forum: English Ivy

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Los Angeles, CA
JKKS
Apr 6, 2018 7:29 PM CST
I am a renter in Los Angeles and I have a patio that faces an incredibly busy street. When I look outside, I see a lot of traffic and pedestrians walking by. I have been eager to block my view of the street with plants. The patio walls are about 7 feet tall and stucco makes up the bottom 5 feet and a black fence-like portion sits on top of the stucco and it's about 2 feet tall. I have tried planting several climbing plants (vines) with the hope that they'll grow and ultimately cover the black fence-like top (not the stucco). I am considering using English Ivy because nothing I plant covers like I want it to. Are there any dangers using English Ivy to cover this area? I have read that it can be invasive and damaging to property. I am, of course, willing to keep it trimmed so that it only covers the 2 feet of fence on top of my stucco walls. Is this a good idea? What are my options? I've included a photo of the patio wall with a chair in front of it (just to give a better idea of the height of the wall). Excuse the soil and sidewalk chalk ... my son and I have been planting out there all day today! TIA
Thumb of 2018-04-07/visitor/ad4188

[Last edited by JKKS - Apr 6, 2018 7:32 PM (+)]
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Apr 6, 2018 8:53 PM CST
Welcome!

Don't plant ANYTHING that will permanently attach itself to your fence. You will be in trouble with your landlord in a flash.

Are you planning to add simular baskets to the wall? What is holding them up? Are they going to eat a major part of your patio? How about something like green beans or Morning Glories?
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
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Bonehead
Apr 6, 2018 9:02 PM CST
Nasturtiums might work as well, and would go nicely with your stucco wall (orange/red/yellow shades) and grow quickly. I think they may be a perennial in your area - for me they die back in the fall. You could easily plant them in your wall mounted baskets and they would quickly colonize the upper fence. Some cultivars are more prone to climbing, which is what you would want to look for.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Deer Organic Gardener Ferns Herbs Dragonflies
Spiders! Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Birds Fruit Growers Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Bonehead
Apr 6, 2018 9:05 PM CST
Nasturtiums might work as well, and would go nicely with your stucco wall (orange/red/yellow shades) and grow quickly. I think they may be a perennial in your area - for me they die back in the fall. You could easily plant them in your wall mounted baskets and they would quickly colonize the upper fence. Some cultivars are more prone to climbing, which is what you would want to look for.

I would be wary of English ivy, it is a real pesky invasive up in the Pacific NW, not sure about California.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

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plantladylin
Apr 7, 2018 7:36 PM CST
Containers with shrubs, small trees or bamboo, placed in front of the wall would hide the view and help buffer the street noise.

If you can hang more baskets along the wall, you could plant trailing annuals whose stems wouldn't be so strong that they'd damage the wall in any way. You didn't mention how old your son is but you could get him involved with the planting, watering and collecting seed for next season. A couple of annual twining types that grow fairly quickly:
Garden Nasturtiums (Tropaeolum majus) (fragrant)
Tall Morning Glory (Ipomoea purpurea 'Grandpa Ott's')
Moon Vine (Ipomoea alba) (fragrant in the evening and at night)
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