Plant and Seed Trading forum: Peach Seed &, other Fruit Trees Wanted

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Name: HydroVegetables
NE Arkansas (Zone 7b)
Region: Arkansas Hydroponics
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HydroVegetables
Apr 11, 2018 1:09 PM CST
Hello,
I am looking for any true parent, or heirloom fruit trees seed, or means to propagate. I just need to know what tree I end up with. I will send postage, and also trade what I have. My seed box is low from just giving seeds to people for Spring.. Will have many seeds for next year for as many as possible. Any: Apple, pear, peach, nectarine, thornlesss berries, black, raspberry thorneless, Pomegranate, dogwood any ornamental too? Please contact me? Thank you! Crossing Fingers!
Picked 07 Feb 2017 from my inside garden.
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Fruit Growers Permaculture Hybridizer Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener Daylilies
Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Photography Herbs Region: United States of America Composter
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ediblelandscapingsc
Apr 13, 2018 9:39 PM CST
Trees and shrubs do not come from seed. If you plant a granny smith apple seed the tree that grows from it will not be a granny smith and the apples may even be red. it will be a kid of granny smith (the mom) and the pollen parent (the dad). Much like human kids are different than their mom because of genes from their dad. Grafting a limb of granny smith on to a apple seedling will give you a true granny smith apple tree and it's the same way with peaches, cherries, plums, ect. Some fruits like figs, blackberries, elderberries, pomegranates, blueberries ect are propagated via cuttings. These also do not come true from seed but root fairly easy.
The chance of getting something as good or better than the parent the seed came from is something like 1 in 1000. Even when hybridizers hand pollinate fruit trees and collect seeds the odds of getting something worth releasing is low. It's best to stick with grafted plants if you have the money to buy them or learn how to root cuttings then move on to grafting. Otherwise you may end up with a 24ft tall tree that only makes 2 apples a year or an Asian pear with thorns and hard bitter fruit. well not really thorns but underdeveloped limbs called spurs that are as sharp as thorns. Trust me I learned the hard way when I first started with long lived edibles. Seeds are not the way to go. Instead watch a few youtube videos on propagating plants via cuttings and try your hand at it with some plants in your yard. Once you get the hang of it in fall you can ask for dormant cuttings to root and you will get true to name plants. Later you can work on grafting if you feel up to the challenge but it's much harder than rooting cuttings.
­čî┐A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered­čî┐
[Last edited by ediblelandscapingsc - Apr 14, 2018 7:18 AM (+)]
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Name: Paula
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
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Turbosaurus
Apr 18, 2018 8:54 PM CST
I have peach tree seedlings 1-4 years old from parents that are at least 50 y.o. Parent trees are still alive, still bearing fruit every year (which is why seedlings pop up all over town). They maxed at about 18' without pruning.
family legend is these are the offspring of my grandmother's trees in Hungary, harvested in the mid 20th century and brought to the US.
I've been lax about the garden since my father passed away and they've been popping up all over. The fruit is small (compared to grapefruit sized supermarket peaches- more tennis ball size, but so sweet they make your teeth hurt.) If you'd like some seedlings, you may have as many as you like for the cost of shipping. Tree mail me if you are interested
Name: Paula
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
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Turbosaurus
Apr 18, 2018 9:39 PM CST
I hear where you're coming from edible SC- but do you have experience with trees that have been handed down through the generations?

The 3 mature tress I have, 2 came from pits from the family orchard in Hungary. A third grew "over the wall" and I don't know how it survived the kudzu and wild roses - but it did. All bear the same fruit. They are not grafts and they are about 8 miles from grand central station in NYC- so I can't imagine they've been cross pollinated with Hudson valley peaches further up the line.

Once you have an "heirloom" you may never go back to grafts. They're hard to find becasue most people aren't interested. It takes patience- they're slow to mature. the fruit is smaller. They live forever, they tolerate any weather and although the fruit is smaller, we would pick laundry baskets full over and over from two trees. The fruit is entirely different. When they were ripe you could put them in your mouth, bite them to break the skin and if you suck just a little- just push it against your hard palate your mouth is flooded and you could just spit out the skin the pit.

SC- I'd love to share with you too if you want to experiment with some old word stock-
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Fruit Growers Permaculture Hybridizer Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener Daylilies
Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Photography Herbs Region: United States of America Composter
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ediblelandscapingsc
Apr 20, 2018 7:52 PM CST
My people are also Hungarian. There is not too many peaches that can survive the winters there however apricots are very popular and hardy. can you please post a pic of some ripe fruit when they produce I'd be curious to see if your tree may be a hybrid or something. Thanks for the offer on the plant material but I'm good on stone fruit.
­čî┐A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered­čî┐

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