Ask a Question forum: "Summerizing" Coleus

Views: 109, Replies: 5 » Jump to the end
Enfield Ct
Irisxrushford
Apr 15, 2018 1:33 PM CST
I know I have seen the answer posted in many areas but now that I'm looking for it I cannot seem to find the string of words to bring it up on Google. Anyways, I have always kept coleus as an indoor plant. Last year was my first having a house and yard. I was very successful planting cuttings of my coleus in shaded areas. However, I'm wondering how to adapt my cuttings to a sunnier area without them becoming burnt. Thank you!
Name: Kyle
Middle TN (Zone 7a)
Region: Tennessee Plant and/or Seed Trader Cat Lover Dog Lover Roses Ferns
Hostas Foliage Fan Bromeliad Heucheras Native Plants and Wildflowers Birds
Image
quercusnut
Apr 15, 2018 1:46 PM CST
You can move them gradually from lower light to brighter light over the course of several days. It would depend on your particular area in the country. Weather conditions and all.
But even if the leaves are burned the new leaves should be ok because they will emerge already adjusted to the brighter location. I wouldn't worry about it too much.
Enfield Ct
Irisxrushford
Apr 15, 2018 2:44 PM CST
Okay! I was thinking of cutting the leaves down because they usually produce more at the base of the elders. So much to learn thank you again.

Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Apr 15, 2018 4:58 PM CST
The more you prune back the Coleus stems before moving it to brighter outdoor light, the easier its transition will be. It is the existing leaves that emerged in lower light that are vulnerable to burn. New leaves that first emerge in brighter outdoor light will be adapted to that light and won't burn.

I have taken winter grown Coleus and pruned back all of the stems so there were no leaves remaining before moving it outside. Within a month or so, it is like getting a brand new plant.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
Tropicals Butterflies Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
purpleinopp
Apr 16, 2018 7:48 AM CST
Some Coleus are bred to have the most spectacular colors in mostly shade, and some will look faded if they are not in mostly sun. If you are able to add a pic of your Coleus, somebody may recognize it, but know that there are thousands of named cultivars. Those bred to be the most spectacular in the shade are going to look washed-out in too much sun, and in some cases, the variegation can be lost in too much sun, yielding just a solid color of leaf.

If you have multiple individuals, the process can be greatly accelerated since you can experiment with multiple exposures at the same time.

If you do not want to sacrifice the size of your plant, you could give it a gradual adjustment, first to shade, then into a bit more sun in the morning or late afternoon, over the course of a month or so, and you should be able to find the tolerance of your plant and the exposure that shows the colors that you most appreciate, even if a specific cultivar name remains elusive. Agree that even if there is some sunburn, it will be very temporary. Coleus grow new leaves very quickly.

The terms that I see most often for this kind of adjustment are acclimation and if the plants are seedlings, hardening-off.
👀😁😂 - SMILE! -☺😎☻☮👌✌∞☯🐣🐦🐔🐝🍯🐾
The less I interfere, the more balance mother nature provides.
👒🎄👣🏡🍃🍂🌾🌿🍁❦❧ 🍃🍁🍂🌾🌻🌸🌼🌹🌽❀☀🌺
☕👓 The only way to succeed is to try.
Name: Jai or Jack
WV (Zone 6b)
Om shanti om.
Container Gardener Region: West Virginia Multi-Region Gardener Garden Photography Amaryllis Zinnias
Gardens in Buckets Annuals Houseplants Plant and/or Seed Trader Birds Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
Jai_Ganesha
Apr 16, 2018 8:29 AM CST
WillC said:The more you prune back the Coleus stems before moving it to brighter outdoor light, the easier its transition will be. It is the existing leaves that emerged in lower light that are vulnerable to burn. New leaves that first emerge in brighter outdoor light will be adapted to that light and won't burn.

I have taken winter grown Coleus and pruned back all of the stems so there were no leaves remaining before moving it outside. Within a month or so, it is like getting a brand new plant.


I do this too. I have several standard (tree) coleus and each year I don't gradually transition them. I just chop off all the leaves (or all except the very smallest), flood them with water and weak fertilizer, and set them outside. They recovery so quickly (and the new leaves are so healthy) that I don't think it's even worth it to harden them off and keep the old leaves.
Keep going!

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by rocklady and is called "NOID Daylily"