Ask a Question forum: Aloe Vera plant getting darker color

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Republic of Macedonia
Tetrix
Apr 16, 2018 7:58 AM CST
Hello everyone.

This is my first post here so I hope I won't break any rule.

I recently bought an Aloe Vera plant. When I got it, it had light green color but now (maybe a month later) , it has more like a dark green color and I am not sure if that is normal.

When I got it since it was cold outside, I kept it indoors. Now the weather is hot so the plant is outdoors during the day and inside during the night because the nights can get cold (below 10 degrees Celsius). During the day the temperature is usually above 20 degrees Celsius.
The plant is mostly exposed on direct sunlight.
I water the plant usually once in a week (make sure the soil is completely dry).

I think I am doing most of the things right but there is probably something that I am missing.

I have added two images. One when I bought the plant (has brighter green color) and one from today (darker green color).

I would appreciate it if anyone can help me identify the problem.

Thumb of 2018-04-16/Tetrix/ac1de2


Thumb of 2018-04-16/Tetrix/4ce293

Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Apr 16, 2018 11:33 AM CST
Be careful moving an indoor plant out into direct overhead sun. There is a big difference between indoor sun and outdoor sun. Regular window glass blocks most of the harmful UV rays, so indoor sun by definition is not direct, it is filtered light. Any plant that goes from an indoor location out into lots of direct sun will experience a shock, enough to change the color of the plant (as you have seen) or even threaten the health of the plant.

If you want to move your plant outside to enjoy the warmer weather, see if you can find a protected location, ideally with overhead protection (like the eaves of a house or a covered porch), so that it receives a measured dose of sun. Start with bright shade, then after a couple of weeks a bit of morning sun, and so on. Gradual accommodation will help you avoid stressing your plant unnecessarily.

These are very tough aloes and your plant is probably going to do just fine. This is just an explanation of why your plant is changing colors (stress colors) and how you can best accomplish the transition to outdoor sun. The Aloe vera plants in the ground here turn totally brown in the summer sun (especially when it's combined with drought) but come right back to green in the fall. The color is informative but not necessarily a sign of any great danger.

Welcome!
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Apr 16, 2018 11:35 AM (+)]
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Republic of Macedonia
Tetrix
Apr 16, 2018 11:52 AM CST
Thank you very much for the help.
I will keep the plant in shade for a few weeks and then expose it to more sun.

AloeVeraCarebyKevin
Apr 19, 2018 9:44 AM CST
From experience I know the dark leafs are dead.Cut back on watering .

Tip stick your finger in the soil to your second bend when dry you can then water.
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
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Baja_Costero
Apr 19, 2018 2:11 PM CST
The dark leaves (which make up pretty much the whole plant) look very much alive to me, unless they are soft or going soft.
Republic of Macedonia
Tetrix
Apr 20, 2018 2:06 AM CST
I also think that the plant is fine. It even started growing new leaf yesterday Smiling . The leaves also hold themselves up.
as @Baja_Costero suggested, I am not exposing the plant on too much direct sunlight, especially in the period of the day when its really hot (1pm - 3pm)
Name: Christine
Saugerties, NY zone 5a
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Christine
Apr 20, 2018 5:18 AM CST
To add to what already has been said, ditch the rocks, they hold to much moisture in the pot, and you want air to be able to help dry out the soil.

AloeVeraCarebyKevin
May 3, 2018 8:56 AM CST
Tetrix said:Hello everyone.

This is my first post here so I hope I won't break any rule.

I recently bought an Aloe Vera plant. When I got it, it had light green color but now (maybe a month later) , it has more like a dark green color and I am not sure if that is normal.

When I got it since it was cold outside, I kept it indoors. Now the weather is hot so the plant is outdoors during the day and inside during the night because the nights can get cold (below 10 degrees Celsius). During the day the temperature is usually above 20 degrees Celsius.
The plant is mostly exposed on direct sunlight.
I water the plant usually once in a week (make sure the soil is completely dry).

I think I am doing most of the things right but there is probably something that I am missing.

I have added two images. One when I bought the plant (has brighter green color) and one from today (darker green color).

I would appreciate it if anyone can help me identify the problem.

Thumb of 2018-04-16/Tetrix/ac1de2


Thumb of 2018-04-16/Tetrix/4ce293


Dark green leafs are not good. This means that you are watering too much. Good luck getting your aloe revived.








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