Cactus and Succulents forum: Help!! First time with an Aloe plant...

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Anarchybatman
Apr 16, 2018 5:06 PM CST
Hello! I'm new to gardening and my partner asked that I try aloe plants. We bought one, and had it in our greenhouse which had some..structural troubles soon after. Long story short, it was out in the cold for a few days, and also in a wind storm :(

I have since moved it inside to a covered porch.

Can this plant still be saved? Should I cut the bad looking parts off? And if so will that hurt the plant?
Thumb of 2018-04-16/Anarchybatman/a2c6b6

Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Apr 17, 2018 11:03 AM CST
There perty tuff. Not the wind. Mine survive low nite temps of 18 F. degree temps.
Possible ?🤔??? Huge temp swing !
Overwatered ! Any, Root Rot ?
I'm guessing !
Where do you live ? Temps ? Anything you can give me would help.
If no root rot. You can just cut off bad parts. They like to off-shoot babies at bottom.
I'm intreaged, as to what happened. Please get back to me.
Thank you 😀👍👍

Tree mail me, if you don't want to go public. 👍👍

Philip 😎😎😎



Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Thijs van Soest
Mesa, AZ (Zone 9b)
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mcvansoest
Apr 17, 2018 11:18 AM CST
Philip makes a lot of great points.

Here are my 2 cents to add: the core of the plant looks intact and healthy, so the plant can most definitely survive this. You will want to keep it warm and dry,
No need to get rid of all the affected leaves immediately, some that have solid looking lower halves may just dry out and be ugly but OK. However, I would remove as many of the lower level leaves that appear to already be mushy pretty much to where they attach to the base of the plant. If those go from mush to rot, which defrosted leaves usually do, it could cause the rot to spread to the core of the plant and that would be bad.

So I'd remove those, keep an eye of the leaves that still have a good section of healthy looking firm lower halves and keep the plant warm, dry, and in as bright light as possible.

As Philip says: these plants are pretty tough so they should pull through, it will just be a little ugly until the new growth takes over. These also grow pretty fast so hopefully it will not take very long.

AloeVeraCarebyKevin
Apr 19, 2018 9:22 AM CST
Anarchybatman said:Hello! I'm new to gardening and my partner asked that I try aloe plants. We bought one, and had it in our greenhouse which had some..structural troubles soon after. Long story short, it was out in the cold for a few days, and also in a wind storm :(

I have since moved it inside to a covered porch.

Can this plant still be saved? Should I cut the bad looking parts off? And if so will that hurt the plant?
Thumb of 2018-04-16/Anarchybatman/a2c6b6

Good thinking moving your Aloe in to a closed porch. Hopefully your porch is well insulated,hopefully your temperature.



Name: Jai or Jack
WV (Zone 6b)
Om shanti om.
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Jai_Ganesha
Apr 19, 2018 9:45 AM CST
Personally, I would go a bit further than mentioned here. I would un-pot the whole plant and just sit the whole thing (with or without the dirt cleared off) so that it can dry out even faster. That little plastic pot will add several days to the drying process, but if you expose all the dirt, it will speed up a lot.
Keep going!
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Apr 19, 2018 2:16 PM CST

Moderator

This looks like cold damage to me. I see no reason to disturb the roots at this point when the plant is already seriously stressed. Wet soil is not the cause of the leaves dying back. If so the damage would go the other direction (from base to tip).
Name: Jai or Jack
WV (Zone 6b)
Om shanti om.
Container Gardener Region: West Virginia Multi-Region Gardener Garden Photography Amaryllis Zinnias
Gardens in Buckets Annuals Houseplants Plant and/or Seed Trader Birds Garden Ideas: Level 1
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Jai_Ganesha
Apr 19, 2018 2:18 PM CST
Do the roots not freeze as well with soil that moist? That would be my worry.
Keep going!
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
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Baja_Costero
Apr 19, 2018 2:28 PM CST

Moderator

I am not the right person to ask. It would help to know what the temperatures were like "out in the cold"... I would imagine the core (and the soil) freezes later than the tips.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Apr 19, 2018 2:30 PM (+)]
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