Avatar for Claracat
Apr 28, 2018 2:08 PM CST
Salem, Oregon
I was told that to take a stem of an Alstroemeria to transplant and create a new plant, you can just pull out the stem (after a year) and plant it. When I did this, there was no root at the end of the stem. Can I plant it like that or do I need to dig it out to get the root?
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Apr 28, 2018 2:55 PM CST
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

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I'm not sure but I don't think Peruvian Lilies (Alstroemeria) can be propagated by stem cuttings. You can divide them by digging a clump of rhizomes (roots) and replanting them elsewhere for additional plants.
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Apr 28, 2018 4:39 PM CST
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Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
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Those instructions were deceptive, Claracat. Pulling out the stems (instead of cutting them down to ground level after blooming) will make the clump spread, but those stems cannot be used to propagate new plants. You can divide the clumps, but try to handle the roots as little as possible. They don't like being handled.
Avatar for Claracat
Apr 28, 2018 5:55 PM CST
Salem, Oregon
Thank you so much. Pulling them out seemed odd to me. Have no idea who gave me that bad info. You're a good group and I appreciate your help!
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Apr 28, 2018 6:59 PM CST
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
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Pulling them is correct for harvesting flowers for the vase/deadheading, but not for starting new plants. I have six different ones for years, and they do multiply well.
Avatar for Claracat
May 1, 2018 2:21 PM CST
Salem, Oregon
How deep should an alstroemerias rhizome be planted in the ground?
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May 1, 2018 2:32 PM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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Plant the crown 6 inches deep.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Avatar for Claracat
May 1, 2018 3:38 PM CST
Salem, Oregon
Thank you Daisy for the quick response.
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May 1, 2018 3:58 PM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Thumbs up
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Avatar for Claracat
May 20, 2018 5:57 PM CST
Salem, Oregon
Claracat here. I've started basil plant indoors and want to know when I can put it in my planter outdoors. I live in zone 8b. Next week temps will be 70s and 80s during the day, dropping to no lower than 50 at night. Okay to plant it with that night temperature? Thank you.
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