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Avatar for BrianHeald
May 1, 2018 4:30 PM CST
Worcesters, MA
Hello, I started my hot peppers indoors 2 months ago because the hot peppers take a long time to germinate and I wanted a jump on the short growing season in New England. However after they germinated their progress halted. The have taken forever to grow their real leaves, and the real leaves are more yellow than green. I have transplanted 1 plant into a bigger container to see if they were root bound but that one isn't growing much faster. I haven't been fertilizing because they're too small. Any ideas on how to ramp up these plants soon?
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May 1, 2018 7:31 PM CST
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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Two ideas:

Stop fertilizing

Provide more heat
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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May 1, 2018 9:30 PM CST
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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Yep, more heat and better light. Peppers like hot weather and full sun.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Avatar for BrianHeald
May 2, 2018 5:21 AM CST
Worcesters, MA
Ok thanks, I have not been fertilizing but they have been indoors this entire time, so they are probably not getting enough heat and sun. Do you think they are too delicate to put outside in the 80 degree weather we're getting for the next couple of days?
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May 2, 2018 6:09 AM CST
Name: Christine
NY zone 5a
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I would start putting them out for a few hours a day, put them in shade first and gradually (over a weeks time) move them into the sun,thats how I do it, watch your night temps, we still have some cool nights here in the Hudson Valley.
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May 2, 2018 7:01 AM CST
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
I have no use for internet bullies!
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Rabbit Keeper Frugal Gardener Garden Ideas: Master Level
Plant Identifier Region: Georgia Native Plants and Wildflowers Composter Garden Sages Bookworm
I agree Yes, I agree with Christine.

You can put the pepper plants outside for just a few hours each day. It's known as 'hardening off'; so the plants can gradually make the adjustment from indoor conditions to being in the great outdoors. Just keep an eye on the temperatures, don't let them get too much wind, start them in the shade and gradually introduce them to the sun, bring them in each night when the temperatures drop. You will see a gradual improvement as the plants adjust to the true sunlight.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
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