Philodendrons, Elephant Ears, and Other Aroids forum: Monstera - need advice on new leaves

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LittleRoots
May 5, 2018 11:32 AM CST
I adopted a Monstera a few months ago and while I've gotten multiple new leaves on it, they're all really small. Is there anything I can do to encourage larger leaves with the holes?
When I got the plant, it already had sizeable leaves with splits and holes. I assumed it would continue to produce those.

The new leaves and the entire plant below for reference
Thumb of 2018-05-05/LittleRoots/51d9d7


Thumb of 2018-05-05/LittleRoots/9ce6d1

Name: Lin
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

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plantladylin
May 5, 2018 12:17 PM CST
Your Ceriman (Monstera deliciosa) is experiencing normal growth. New, juvenile leaves are more heart shaped with no holes or splits. As the plant ages and the leaves grow larger, the holes and splits begin to appear.

Juvenile leaves, no holes/splits .......... Juvenile and maturing leaves beginning to show splits


Maturing leaves with holes and splits ... Mature leaves
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LittleRoots
May 5, 2018 1:15 PM CST
Isn't the plants considered mature if it has already produced the large, split leaves?
What would make it produce juvenile leaves after that?
Name: Lin
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
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plantladylin
May 5, 2018 2:12 PM CST
Monstera is a vine that climbs way up into tree canopies. It's normal for new leaves to emerge along the stems as the plant grows and travels and the vine can have both mature leaves as well as new, juvenile leaves all at the same time; the cycle can be continuous.
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Name: Gene Staver
Portage WI 53901 (Zone 5a)
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gasrocks
May 6, 2018 7:16 AM CST
New leaves give you feedback as to current conditions. That is why it is a great plant for beginners. If the plant get moved or conditions change, new leaves will you this by not being as dramatic as older leaves. With that vine you first get plain, small heart shaped leaves. They get bigger, Then splits show up. Then holes. That is if it is growing in a good place. Gene

Prettiwylde
Feb 25, 2019 10:56 AM CST
gasrocks said:New leaves give you feedback as to current conditions. That is why it is a great plant for beginners. If the plant get moved or conditions change, new leaves will you this by not being as dramatic as older leaves. With that vine you first get plain, small heart shaped leaves. They get bigger, Then splits show up. Then holes. That is if it is growing in a good place. Gene

Hi Gene and I apologise because I think I may have hijacked the thread.
I am only new and on mobile so please be gentle with me.
I intercepted because I am looking for some information regarding Monstera and i have been scouring the threads for a weeks now and notice you do seem to be very educated on most topics.
I have a monstera (i know. . I know. .)
I grew from propagated cuttings of mature plants.
My monstera is very happy,healthy and so on and I have just taken a few cuttings for a friend and waiting for them to root.
I was just wondering if there would be a reason my monstera has never sent up a new shoot?
Plenty of new leaves and its otherwise thriving but does it point to the plant lacking something if it doesn't send up new growth?
Thank you.
That's all. I have googled and read all over but just cant find an answer .
I appreciate your time Gene.
Thanks
Jasmine

Name: Gene Staver
Portage WI 53901 (Zone 5a)
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gasrocks
Feb 25, 2019 12:12 PM CST
Monstera is a vine. It will only grow upwards, longer. I does not clump. It does not put out babies, pups. Gene
Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
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Gina1960
Feb 25, 2019 6:34 PM CST
Ummmm, all of mine put out side shoots. I know I know. Differences again. But they do. A new shoot can start from anywhere on the stem where a node is. But mine are allowed to climb as high as 12-15 feet. They aren't growing in a container. Usually, I hate to cut my plants, but when I am propagating for myself (especially the variegated plants) these side shoots are what I cut off. I do this to keep them from covering the wall and blocking out all the light from other plants. Offshoots of Monstera are called suckers. Or just, well, offshoots.
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[Last edited by Gina1960 - Feb 25, 2019 6:46 PM (+)]
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Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
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Gina1960
Feb 26, 2019 12:47 PM CST
@Prettiwylde,
this is what your Monstera will do when it makes a new offshoot (sucker). It will just put out a new shoot off the main stem that starts going off in a new direction. These can occur at any point on a stem....low to the ground. or high up on a stem. They can either grow kind of waving in the air until they hit something that their adventitious roots can latch on to, then they will stick and start climbing, or, they can grow down to the ground, root into the soil, and run along the forest floor until the run into something to climb. So new shoots will not generally emerge from under the soil, rather, they emerge above the soil. I have had them come out at soil level on some of my variegated monsteras, however....I let those run on the ground until they have a good root system then I propagate them off to start a new climbing plant.

You can also propagate your plant should you ever want to by the 'buried cane' method that is often used for Costus ginger propagation....cut off a length of them, cut off all the leaves, cut it into sections each having a couple nodes, and bury halfway in a shallow dish of soil. Keep damp to moist but not drenched. Each section of cane should produce and entirely new plant that can be potted up single or in groups or planted out in the ground.
Thumb of 2019-02-26/Gina1960/fc09bc

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Prettiwylde
Mar 4, 2019 6:37 AM CST
Gina1960 said:@Prettiwylde,
this is what your Monstera will do when it makes a new offshoot (sucker). It will just put out a new shoot off the main stem that starts going off in a new direction. These can occur at any point on a stem....low to the ground. or high up on a stem. They can either grow kind of waving in the air until they hit something that their adventitious roots can latch on to, then they will stick and start climbing, or, they can grow down to the ground, root into the soil, and run along the forest floor until the run into something to climb. So new shoots will not generally emerge from under the soil, rather, they emerge above the soil. I have had them come out at soil level on some of my variegated monsteras, however....I let those run on the ground until they have a good root system then I propagate them off to start a new climbing plant.

You can also propagate your plant should you ever want to by the 'buried cane' method that is often used for Costus ginger propagation....cut off a length of them, cut off all the leaves, cut it into sections each having a couple nodes, and bury halfway in a shallow dish of soil. Keep damp to moist but not drenched. Each section of cane should produce and entirely new plant that can be potted up single or in groups or planted out in the ground.
Thumb of 2019-02-26/Gina1960/fc09bc



Thank you so much.
I have seen others with photos of new growth popping up through the soil.
Perhaps they are not Monstera but the larger philodendron?
I know there are 2 that can look very similar.
I appreciate your reply.
It has helped rest my mind.
Have taken some cuttings for propagation and they are rooting quite well with a new bud forming just below the cut.
Thank you.
Very much.
You do so much here and answer so many.
Very appreciated.
Name: Gina
Florida (Zone 9a)
Tropical plant collector 35 years
Region: Florida Tropicals Aroids
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Gina1960
Mar 4, 2019 6:45 AM CST
The plant is capable of producing a new shoot from a leaf node anywhere on its stem, sometimes, that may be from below the soil level. A leaf node can turn into three things: a new leaf, a new stem, or a new root. But most Monstera that are sold in nurseries have more than one main stem in the container planted together for a fuller look. That is why it looks like the plant may be more bushy, and not a single stem. Its the same selling tactic as orchids, they only try to sell the ones that are actually blooming because psychologically, unless a person is very knowledgeable about a certain orchid and knows what the bloom looks like, people will only buy blooming plants. Monstera and foliage plants are the same...no one wants to buy what looks like a spindly single stem plant
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