Ask a Question forum→Tips on fertilizing tree

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Louisville Kentucky
TaylorVet
May 8, 2018 7:02 PM CST
Newbie here. I'm wondering what kind of tree this evergreen is and what's going on with it. I thought it might be a Blue Spruce...? Either way it looks a little bit like a Charlie Brown a Christmas tree. Any tips to help it grow? Is it just old? Or do I need to fertilize it or something?
Thumb of 2018-05-09/TaylorVet/a93022

Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
May 8, 2018 9:24 PM CST
Welcome!

I don't see anything wrong with your tree - Its beautiful. Lower branches are often lost when the bottom of the tree isn't in enough sun.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Big Bill
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
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BigBill
May 9, 2018 5:18 AM CST
It is a wonderful tree and I seriously doubt whether or not you feeding it would be advisable. I see beautiful spruce trees all over Michigan, they are my favorite evergreen but they have one thing in common, full sunshine. As small trees they tolerate less sun but once mature, they need full sun to look their best.
I do not think feeding a mature tree can make up for a light issue.
Just enjoy it and prune back any dead branches that you can reach!
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[Last edited by BigBill - May 9, 2018 5:20 AM (+)]
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Louisville Kentucky
TaylorVet
May 9, 2018 7:03 AM CST
I uploaded another photo. It isn't too bare?


Thumb of 2018-05-09/TaylorVet/de4eca


Thumb of 2018-05-09/TaylorVet/ac7293

[Last edited by TaylorVet - May 9, 2018 7:04 AM (+)]
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Name: Kyle
Middle TN (Zone 7a)
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quercusnut
May 9, 2018 7:05 AM CST
Looks pretty good to me. Thumbs up
Name: Big Bill
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
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BigBill
May 9, 2018 8:38 AM CST
Re-read my response to you. You will not be able to fertilize an outdoor tree to make it fuller!!!! Orchids, annuals, perennials, azaleas and house plants will like a little food. But if your plant needed more sunlight 5-10 years ago to make it grow fuller, your feeding it now is just an unnecessary waste of your time and money. Waste $$$$ if you want to but it will not make a bit of difference.
This is a native mature tree. Just enjoy it a spend money on feeding flowers, not trees.
Rodney Wilcox Jones, my idol!
Businessman, Orchid grower, hybridizer, lived to 107!
Name: Big Bill
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
American Orchid Society Judge
Region: United States of America Critters Allowed Growing under artificial light Echinacea Hostas Region: Michigan
Butterflies Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Orchids Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
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BigBill
May 9, 2018 8:41 AM CST
Look at all the shade it is in from all of your pictures!! It needs sunshine, 365 days a year from 360 degrees. Just enjoy it for what it is, NOT for what it could have been.
Rodney Wilcox Jones, my idol!
Businessman, Orchid grower, hybridizer, lived to 107!
Louisville Kentucky
TaylorVet
May 9, 2018 10:10 AM CST
Thanks guys!!
Name: Dr. Demento Jr.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
May 9, 2018 12:24 PM CST
TaylorVet said:Newbie here. I'm wondering what kind of tree this evergreen is and what's going on with it. I thought it might be a Blue Spruce...? Either way it looks a little bit like a Charlie Brown a Christmas tree. Any tips to help it grow? Is it just old? Or do I need to fertilize it or something?
Thumb of 2018-05-09/TaylorVet/a93022

If you really, really, really want to pamper it, it is not that old of a tree yet, remove all grass to the drip-line . Then lightly, repeat lightly roto-till that area and cover it with some sort of mulch. I have used ever green wood chips under two different types of spruce that were about that size, maybe four to five fee higher , although for years I used Eucalyptus till became too expensive or not available.
Now they are at least fifteen feet taller and healthy even though who ever put them there at least ten years before I dealt with them put them too close together.
I did put those fertalizer spikes in the ground around the drip line, four per tree for about ten years and do it now on occasion because I have them.
I did same thing twenty years ago with a Black Pine I rescued that was sickly and five feet-six tall, now it is very healthy and over twenty feet tall.
For that one I now simply rake the pine needles under it and have not mulched it for ten years.

New growth on the tree will show if any efforts you make are having an effect. Do not expect miracles but you will see a difference it you are willing to put the time and MONEY into it.

Louisville Kentucky
TaylorVet
May 9, 2018 4:39 PM CST
RpR said:If you really, really, really want to pamper it, it is not that old of a tree yet, remove all grass to the drip-line . Then lightly, repeat lightly roto-till that area and cover it with some sort of mulch. I have used ever green wood chips under two different types of spruce that were about that size, maybe four to five fee higher , although for years I used Eucalyptus till became too expensive or not available.
Now they are at least fifteen feet taller and healthy even though who ever put them there at least ten years before I dealt with them put them too close together.
I did put those fertalizer spikes in the ground around the drip line, four per tree for about ten years and do it now on occasion because I have them.
I did same thing twenty years ago with a Black Pine I rescued that was sickly and five feet-six tall, now it is very healthy and over twenty feet tall.
For that one I now simply rake the pine needles under it and have not mulched it for ten years.

New growth on the tree will show if any efforts you make are having an effect. Do not expect miracles but you will see a difference it you are willing to put the time and MONEY into it.



I just looked at my neighbors spruce that looks AMAZING...and he has done exactly what you said! I think I'll try removing the grass. Thanks for the input!!

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[Last edited by TaylorVet - May 9, 2018 4:42 PM (+)]
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