Ask a Question forum: new hedge shrub choices after removing judd viburnums that died after many years

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Chicagoland
GWiz
May 10, 2018 4:04 PM CST
My line of 6 judd viburnums forming an edge on the west side of my yard died down the line over the past 2 years. I removed them.

I now want to replant shrubs for a casual hedge there. I was told not to replant the judd. No real solution to what killed them. Do I need to do something to the soil to clarify it or ready it for new plants?

Any ideas of good part sun/part shade shrubs for a border between neighbors? Not a tight, trimmed privet or honeysuckle or anything like that.

Thanks
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
May 11, 2018 12:32 PM CST
Could be something in soil. Get your soil tested by local co-op extension.
Test is cheep, some places, it's free.
Also, could be a drainage issue. If soil doesn't drain well, you may need to till in some perlite or chicken grit.
You will need to till ground at any rate, before planting new hedges.

For new hedge, I like boxwoods myself, of course I don't know if there suited for your climate ?
Your local nursery will know what types are suitable for your area, and soil type.
Enjoy your weekend. 😀👍👍
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Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Kyle
Middle TN (Zone 7a)
Region: Tennessee Plant and/or Seed Trader Cat Lover Dog Lover Roses Ferns
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quercusnut
May 11, 2018 8:46 PM CST
How about Ninebarks (Physocarpus)? There are several beautiful varieties in different colors and they have nice blooms in spring. Summer Wine has purple foliage, Coppertina has coppery-colored foliage and Dart's Gold is yellow/chartreuse. There are a few others; those are 3 of the ones I have. Very easy to grow.
And I disagree about tilling up the soil. If the spacing is suitable to your eye you could plant them in between where the viburnums grew.
[Last edited by quercusnut - May 11, 2018 8:48 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1706506 (3)
MN (Zone 4a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1
Hostalady
Jul 5, 2019 11:10 PM CST
Guessing from your post you are in the Chicago area. I am in Minnesota and put in 2 different Ninebarks approx 3 years ago.
1) Tiny Wine...leaves are small and burgundy colored, very dense shrub. On NE corner of house where there are no trees shading it. Now is approx 3.5 ft tall. On R side in attached picture.
2) Amber Jubilee...leaves are larger than #1 and amber colored. Also very dense. On East side of house where there are no trees shading it. Now is approx 4 ft tall. On L side in picture. Ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius First Editions® Amber Jubilee®)

Really like both shrubs. They are flowering in the July 4th picture. Planning to put in 2 more...having trouble deciding which one to use because I like them both.
Thumb of 2019-07-06/Hostalady/a4fa2a

[Last edited by Hostalady - Jul 5, 2019 11:22 PM (+)]
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Southern Indiana (Zone 6a)
I'll quit while I'm ahead...
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CrazedHoosier
Jul 5, 2019 11:49 PM CST
GWiz said:My line of 6 judd viburnums forming an edge on the west side of my yard died down the line over the past 2 years. I removed them.

I now want to replant shrubs for a casual hedge there. I was told not to replant the judd. No real solution to what killed them. Do I need to do something to the soil to clarify it or ready it for new plants?

Any ideas of good part sun/part shade shrubs for a border between neighbors? Not a tight, trimmed privet or honeysuckle or anything like that.

Thanks


If you're looking for a reliable, cheap, fast growing hedge that will put on a summer/fall show, how about rose of sharon? We have some on our property that have NEVER had an issue in partial shade for 19 years now. Gorgeous colors in July-October—wet site and drought tolerant. They also bloom on new wood, so you can trim them as much as you want. There are of course the classic rose of sharon you can find anywhere, but there are dwarfs such as Pollypetite, and more vertical types like Purple Pillar.
Maybe we should get a second opinion...
[Last edited by CrazedHoosier - Jul 5, 2019 11:50 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #2015870 (5)
Central Florida (Zone 9a)
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slowcala
Jul 6, 2019 1:28 AM CST
What about Forsythia, Spirea, or Tee Tree Olive?
'Only love can be divided endlessly and still not deminish' ~ Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Name: Sally
central Maryland
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sallyg
Jul 6, 2019 5:06 AM CST
how much width will the hedge take up? I ask because some like Forsythia will sprawl out easily 6 feet on both sides of the plant. I have Fosythia along my driveway and have to prune to keep it off us.
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
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