Ask a Question forum: Fruit trees

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San Diego
Cristiangee
May 10, 2018 4:24 PM CST
Can anyone tell me what's the best soil for fruit trees? & how big should you dig a hole before transplant for successful growth
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
May 10, 2018 6:45 PM CST
The best soil for fruit trees or any tree is whatever is already in your yard. Studies have shown that trees planted in un-amended native soil do much better than trees planted with compost and amendments. The problem is that trees don't want to leave the comfort of the cushy stuff they have been planted in. The effect is that you have just planted a tree in a big underground pot.

Loosen the dirt to the depth of the pot you are transplanting from but make the hole twice as wide.

Good luck!
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Oklahoma (Zone 7b)
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armyvet2013
May 10, 2018 8:13 PM CST
Cristiangee said:Can anyone tell me what's the best soil for fruit trees? & how big should you dig a hole before transplant for successful growth


I have a lot of hard clay on my land. My recipe for success is to dig a not too big hole, fill it back in a bit with potting soil, set the bare root or remove the tree and soil from the pot and set it into the hole, finish filling with mix of potting soil and clay, and soak the ground.

Then whenever I water, I water less often, but more deeply.

I've successfully planted three separate types of apple trees from bare root and seeds. I transplanted a Black Walnut I grew from seed, and I've added Paw Paw shipped bare root, and grown sand plums direct sown into the soil.

As long as you get fruit trees adapted to your climate zone you should be just fine.



If you're soil is poor nitrogen wise, seed your lawn with clover since it's a great nitrogen fixer and decent famine food.

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