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May 13, 2018 1:55 AM CST
Malta
I recently moved into an old house and found aloe veras laying in broken pots on the ground. I don't know how long they have been like this. I repotted them trying to salvage them. However, they have this brown colour on some of the leaves. Can you tell me why the brown and how I can help them, please?
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May 13, 2018 12:30 PM CST
Moderator
Name: Thijs van Soest
Tempe, AZ (Zone 9b)
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Welcome!

Did you move the Aloes into a more sunny spot? You probably also did not really know which side was facing south before given that they were on the ground. I could just be sun burn. It looks a little weird and given that it seems to affect the newer leaves in the core and not so much the older outer ones gives me some pause, but it does not look like the leaf is getting mushy.

Is the soil well draining and how often do you water them?

BTW. Your plants are definitely Aloes, but given how they look are almost certainly not actual Aloe vera, which is a specific Aloe. Aloe vera is often used by people to indicate any kind of Aloe, but technically that is not correct.
It is what it is!
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May 13, 2018 9:04 PM CST
Name: Paula Benyei
NYC suburbs (Zone 6b)
Ditto, its a sunburn.

Plants are a lot like people- they need a bit of a base tan, lol, before they can tolerate full all day sun- I am not sure what summers are like in Malta, but in NY I gradually move them around this time of year into sunnier spots and I always make a mistake where some plant gets a bit of a burn- but its worth it. An aloe slowly acclimated to full sun over 2-3 weeks will tend to do better than one I leave in part shade.
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May 14, 2018 6:00 AM CST
Malta
mcvansoest said:Welcome!

Did you move the Aloes into a more sunny spot? You probably also did not really know which side was facing south before given that they were on the ground. I could just be sun burn. It looks a little weird and given that it seems to affect the newer leaves in the core and not so much the older outer ones gives me some pause, but it does not look like the leaf is getting mushy.

Is the soil well draining and how often do you water them?

BTW. Your plants are definitely Aloes, but given how they look are almost certainly not actual Aloe vera, which is a specific Aloe. Aloe vera is often used by people to indicate any kind of Aloe, but technically that is not correct.


I left the plants in the same yard I've found them.

Some told me that it could be a fungal disease on them as well. So I don't know what to think or if I can cure them at all.

I've re-potted them in new pots, so draining should be fine and I water them only when the soil is dry to the touch. I was always told that they don't need to much water.

Oh, I will try to find out their actual name then, maybe I get closer to figuring out what's wrong with them.

Thank you for your help Smiling
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May 14, 2018 6:04 AM CST
Malta
Turbosaurus said:Ditto, its a sunburn.

Plants are a lot like people- they need a bit of a base tan, lol, before they can tolerate full all day sun- I am not sure what summers are like in Malta, but in NY I gradually move them around this time of year into sunnier spots and I always make a mistake where some plant gets a bit of a burn- but its worth it. An aloe slowly acclimated to full sun over 2-3 weeks will tend to do better than one I leave in part shade.


It's mostly sunny all year round here. I've been taking care of these plants for about two months now. The brown colour was on them when I found them, and I just want to know if they are healthy and how to properly take care of them.
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May 14, 2018 10:02 AM CST
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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It does not look like sunburn to me, and I've sunburnt lots of aloes. Smiling The brown parts are raised and bumpy, which I do not normally see with sunburn. And the bottoms of the leaves are also affected, which would not be the case with sunburn because they are not facing the sun. Maybe some kind of fungus on the leaves? I'm guessing it will pass if you continue to provide the aloe good care. Keep an eye on the new leaves as they grow out.
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May 14, 2018 10:37 AM CST
Moderator
Name: Thijs van Soest
Tempe, AZ (Zone 9b)
Region: Arizona Enjoys or suffers hot summers Cactus and Succulents Xeriscape Adeniums Hybridizer
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You have a point Baja, but the fact they were found on the ground in broken pots might have allowed for exposure to the sun of normally not exposed parts of the plant.

My Aloe ferox gets raised damage from sunburn. I went through a very similar q&a with someone on Agaveville when I thought my ferox was being affected by something, but someone assured me that what I was seeing was just due to sun burn. Now that did not look quite the same as this, so...

To be on the save side a treatment with a systemic fungicide would certainly not hurt the plant.
It is what it is!
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