Ask a Question forum: How to save my friend's Aloe Aristata?

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Name: Sabi
Nothern California (Zone 9a)
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sabigrows
May 13, 2018 1:18 PM CST
My friend gave me this Aloe yesterday. Earlier I was cutting pups off to take care of them not knowing that she would eventually just give it to me. I was happy lol.

As you can see it was extremely stressed. Are the colors of the leaves a sign of over watering? It was also outside in mostly direct sunlight.

I plucked off the bad looking leaves and also seperated all the pups and cleaned them up too. What should I do now?



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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
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Baja_Costero
May 13, 2018 5:16 PM CST
Leave the plant in a bright place out of the sun without watering for a week or so. You can pot up the offsets all together in one pot if you like, mostly on top of the soil with just the root nubbin poking into the soil. Then water well and wait until the soil is dry at depth to water again. Once you see new growth on the mother plant or the offsets, you can move them into a bit of sun. This plant requires excellent drainage and strong light, but it looks best without a lot of direct overhead sun. Outdoors it will enjoy filtered light or morning sun, at most, while it's in shock. If it's going to be an indoor plant, provide as much light as you possibly can.

It's better not to cut the offsets. If you separate them by gently pulling them from the mother plant, you can get them with the roots intact. Do this with the plant out of the pot, for best results. Next time, of course.... Smiling

Also, do not pull dead or dying leaves off the base of the plant unless they let go easily, which is usually when they are brown and completely dry. Were those leaves you pulled rotting out? Otherwise, avoid the type of grooming you just performed in the future. What ends up happening if you do this regularly is that a bunch of broken leaf ends (the ones still attached to the plant) are exposed to microbes in the soil and provide them a route of entry. Aloes do not typically let go of their leaves until they have extracted every last drop of water from them, and there is no benefit to rushing the process. I see the leaves you pulled are mostly intact, so I don't think you caused any great harm, this is just advice for the future.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - May 13, 2018 5:28 PM (+)]
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Name: Sabi
Nothern California (Zone 9a)
Image
sabigrows
May 14, 2018 3:56 PM CST
Baja_Costero said:Leave the plant in a bright place out of the sun without watering for a week or so. You can pot up the offsets all together in one pot if you like, mostly on top of the soil with just the root nubbin poking into the soil. Then water well and wait until the soil is dry at depth to water again. Once you see new growth on the mother plant or the offsets, you can move them into a bit of sun. This plant requires excellent drainage and strong light, but it looks best without a lot of direct overhead sun. Outdoors it will enjoy filtered light or morning sun, at most, while it's in shock. If it's going to be an indoor plant, provide as much light as you possibly can.

It's better not to cut the offsets. If you separate them by gently pulling them from the mother plant, you can get them with the roots intact. Do this with the plant out of the pot, for best results. Next time, of course.... Smiling

Also, do not pull dead or dying leaves off the base of the plant unless they let go easily, which is usually when they are brown and completely dry. Were those leaves you pulled rotting out? Otherwise, avoid the type of grooming you just performed in the future. What ends up happening if you do this regularly is that a bunch of broken leaf ends (the ones still attached to the plant) are exposed to microbes in the soil and provide them a route of entry. Aloes do not typically let go of their leaves until they have extracted every last drop of water from them, and there is no benefit to rushing the process. I see the leaves you pulled are mostly intact, so I don't think you caused any great harm, this is just advice for the future.



Why did the leaves that I plucked off turn pinkish brown anyways? Was it due to over watering? The pups are like that also. Should I keep it in full sun or partial?
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
May 14, 2018 5:53 PM CST
I don't think that color is necessarily a sign of anything wrong. If the leaf is soft or rotten then maybe. Keep the plant out of direct overhead sun. Indoor sun is fine. Morning sun or filtered light is fine outdoors. Full sun is never a good idea for a plant you suspect may be going through a crisis, or rootless offsets.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - May 14, 2018 6:27 PM (+)]
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