Ask a Question forum→Norfolk Island Pine??

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Michigan
iwetmyplants
May 14, 2018 6:57 AM CST
Hello,
Newbie here Smiling I'm also in love with plants and gardens but just really starting to learn how to truly care and understand them.

So, I was given a plant that I have been researching to figure out what type it is. Closest I've figured out so far is a Norfolk Island Pine? I'm worried about it as it's trunk area is brown and sharp at the bottom and beautifully green at the top, been like this since I picked up about a month ago. They've been wanting me to take it for almost a year now. When I first saw it, it had long branches all the way to the bottom. I'm in Adrian, Michigan.. before it came to me it was in the office of a metal distributor (Lansing, MI) I get supplies from. They had (Charlie) near a window and they told me they knew nothing about it other then (Charlie) liked coffee water? I'm really hoping there is something I can do to bring this plant back. I fell in love with it when I saw it...Right now I have it near a big window, seems to be enjoying the sun, once it gets dry enough I water it to the point the soil is moist again. I'm also worried that the pot maybe to small.

I'm not even sure if I'm in the right direction as to what type of plant this is, any info would be appreciated.

I'd also be happy to take more photos if need be.
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[Last edited by iwetmyplants - May 14, 2018 7:44 AM (+)]
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Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
May 14, 2018 7:25 AM CST
Norfolk pine is correct.👍
Can't see pot, for the leaf. He he.
More sun or maybe your letting it dry to much between watering.
We'll give Will a buzz. He can tell you. 👍
Ring, ring ! @WillC Ring ring !
He said he'll get to you soon. 👍👍

Ttfn 👍
😎😎😎
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
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WillC
May 14, 2018 12:29 PM CST
Thanks for the call, Philip!

It is definitely a Norfolk Island Pine. Keep it right in front of and close to a moderately sunny window that is completely uncovered during the daylight hours. Lots of good light is critical to success.

I can't see the pot, but I'm quite sure it does not need a bigger pot.

In general, allow the top half-inch of soil to get dry before adding enough water so that a bit trickles through the drain holes.

This can be an unforgiving plant that will drop its needles leaves quickly if it doesn't get enough light and if it is not watered properly.

NO COFFEE!
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Michigan
iwetmyplants
May 14, 2018 2:12 PM CST
Thank you for the response. Is there anything I can do to help it grow back even if it can be an unforgiving plant or is it just slowly going to die even if I care for it as stated? Would it help to move it out on my deck during the day to make sure it gets the light it needs? My deck has parcel sun, direct sun and shaded areas during the day.

I attached a few more photos, sorry they seam dark. We have had a lot of rain the last few days and heavy clouds.

I really appreciate the help.
Jenn


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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
Image
WillC
May 14, 2018 4:42 PM CST
Hi Jenn - There are few shortcuts in nature and none for the otherwise slow-growing Norfolk Island Pine. I can see from the elongated spacing between the tiers of fronds that it has not had optimum light for long before you acquired it.

The difficulty with these trees is that they have only one growing tip at the very top and never produce new growth below that growing tip, nor do they produce branches. The best you can hope for is that it will continue to produce new fronds at the top while the lower portion remains sparse. Nothing can change that.

Movin it outside into direct sunlight would be detrimental as it is not adapted to that much sunlight. Do everything you can to maximize the indoor light that it receives. And water it as I described previously being careful not to let the soil get too dry deep in the pot.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
Image
Philipwonel
May 15, 2018 7:52 AM CST
Direct sun will kill them.
The only way for them to survive outdoors is in total shade all day.
I've seen a few nice ones around town, at people's front door covered entry-ways in a position that never gets any direct sun. Entry-way was also enclosed on three sides.



Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Cinda
Indiana Zone 5b
Dances with Dirt
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gardengus
May 15, 2018 8:20 AM CST
Philip
The person with the pine is in Michigan

Michigan direct sun= Florida shade Smiling
Keep believing ,hoping,and loving
all else is just existing.
There is More to Life Than Now
Michigan
iwetmyplants
May 16, 2018 2:44 AM CST
Thank you for the help. 😊
Name: Big Bill
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
American Orchid Society Judge
Region: United States of America Critters Allowed Growing under artificial light Echinacea Hostas Region: Michigan
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BigBill
May 16, 2018 8:08 AM CST
Having moved to Michigan recently from Florida, let me offer this. Mature pines grow beautifully in full sun. People down there give young plants partial sun for a few years. When they become large and unwieldy, they plant them in the ground.
If it were my plant in Michigan, I would move it outside around May 1st and bring it in around October 1st. I would place it where it gets 3-4 hours of sun then otherwise bright. If the leaves start to yellow all over, back off on the light.
Water it to keep it from really drying out, never have it soggy. Make sure soil and pot drain well.
During the winter put it in the brightest, sunniest spot you have.
Good luck!!
Rodney Wilcox Jones, my idol!
Businessman, Orchid grower, hybridizer, lived to 107!

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