Ask a Question forum: Tips to grow herb garden in your backyard

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Name: Nancy Grace
Toronto
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nancyvinci
May 15, 2018 11:01 PM CST
Hi,
I work as a Senior Engineer in a reputed company. The work is really stressful, but one that helps me escape from all these is gardening. Gardening has always been my passion. I have a small rose garden in my backyard. I have a lot of rose varieties. Some of the roses I have are John Cabot, The Fairy, Morden Blush, Iceberg, Lavaglut, etc.. The Lavaglut, Iceberg, and Grusse an Aachen has always been my fav.
I am thinking of starting a herb garden too. As everyone knows, herbs are such a great way to add healthy nutrients to your diet. They're actually plant-based foods that offer vitamins, antioxidants, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory benefits. Also, they add flavor to the dish. I am a great fan of Basil, Rosemary, and Chives. So I was thinking to grow them in my backyard along with my roses. So, I would like to know how you grow your herb garden.
Also, I would like to know if animals would eat these herbs. Though I have smart security systems at home and a security camera in the backyard. I would also like to know some tips on preventing animals entering in my garden.
Please suggest some herb growing tips and to control animals entering in my garden. Just tell me what you do to prevent these.
UK
Starfishmomma
May 16, 2018 8:52 AM CST
if i were to start a proper herb garden, I'd make it out of raised beds to keep the low growing herbs a bit further away from the ground. As always, you'd need to bear in mind any spread of a plant and their height. Will you be incorporating some sort of protection for your very cold winters, or will you be sowing seed every year? Rosemary can be bought as cute little shrubby plants in pots like the one I bought. I put it in the ground and it's grown quite tall in a few years. The photo shows how woody they can become, and how badly I've shaped it. How much herb do you want - the least expensive but longer way is to start from seed, more expensive but with immediate access to herbs would be to buy plug plants or small potted versions. Chives are hardy perennials (in UK anyway) and increase gradually and you can split clumps and spread them around over time, sage is also a hardy perennial that I've often cut right down and it grows back. It has now grown into a little 50cm high shrub (photo shows how woody it can get), cuttings are easy to root although I prefer the layering method and I've produce many news plants from it. Lemon balm is another hardy perennial that can be cut right down and grows back, and can be split easily to increase numbers. There are various mints of the ordinary minty type and also mints with hints of other plants, like apple mint, chocolate mint, etc. There are also several types of thyme and they're cute little herb plants like the one I have (photo) or low growing types like the one I used to have that was lemony. You could look up "companion planting", they're good for other plants, not just us! Garlic benefiting roses is the only one that comes to mind right now. If you're going to have lavender, look into getting something like Grosso that is more fragrant than the ordinary kind, some of which are scented only if you sniff the flower directly. I mentioned how woody some of them can become in case that helps with your very cold winters. My one rose that is out right now is Margaret Merril, her neighbour Arthur Bell is still in bud.
UK
Starfishmomma
May 16, 2018 8:53 AM CST
Oh dear. My photos didn't upload successfully - anyone know what might have gone wrong?
Name: Nancy Grace
Toronto
Image
nancyvinci
May 31, 2018 5:18 AM CST
Starfishmomma said:if i were to start a proper herb garden, I'd make it out of raised beds to keep the low growing herbs a bit further away from the ground. As always, you'd need to bear in mind any spread of a plant and their height. Will you be incorporating some sort of protection for your very cold winters, or will you be sowing seed every year? Rosemary can be bought as cute little shrubby plants in pots like the one I bought. I put it in the ground and it's grown quite tall in a few years. The photo shows how woody they can become, and how badly I've shaped it. How much herb do you want - the least expensive but longer way is to start from seed, more expensive but with immediate access to herbs would be to buy plug plants or small potted versions. Chives are hardy perennials (in UK anyway) and increase gradually and you can split clumps and spread them around over time, sage is also a hardy perennial that I've often cut right down and it grows back. It has now grown into a little 50cm high shrub (photo shows how woody it can get), cuttings are easy to root although I prefer the layering method and I've produce many news plants from it. Lemon balm is another hardy perennial that can be cut right down and grows back, and can be split easily to increase numbers. There are various mints of the ordinary minty type and also mints with hints of other plants, like apple mint, chocolate mint, etc. There are also several types of thyme and they're cute little herb plants like the one I have (photo) or low growing types like the one I used to have that was lemony. You could look up "companion planting", they're good for other plants, not just us! Garlic benefiting roses is the only one that comes to mind right now. If you're going to have lavender, look into getting something like Grosso that is more fragrant than the ordinary kind, some of which are scented only if you sniff the flower directly. I mentioned how woody some of them can become in case that helps with your very cold winters. My one rose that is out right now is Margaret Merril, her neighbour Arthur Bell is still in bud.


This is really great. thanks for sharing... Thumbs up
[Last edited by nancyvinci - May 31, 2018 5:19 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1723323 (4)
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland Composter Region: Mid-Atlantic Native Plants and Wildflowers
Keeper of Poultry Region: United States of America Dog Lover Cat Lover Birds
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sallyg
May 31, 2018 6:22 AM CST
I can't help , about animals.
Basil loves warm weather, grows fast, and blooms. Goes downhill fast after blooming. Usually easy to find at nurseries as baby plants in spring, also easy from seed. Buy baby plants AND plant seed at the same time, and have a longer season of growth. Home made pesto is great.
Rosemary, as Starfishmomma says. Check if it is hardy there though? May need to be potted and brought inside. Not as fast growing as basil.
Chives also as baby plants in spring like basil. Common chives does not multiply for me all that well. Garlic chives multiplies much TOO well.
Rabbits and groundhogs don't seem to eat my herbs.
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
I have no use for internet bullies!
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greene
May 31, 2018 6:31 AM CST
Do you use any type of sprays or powders on your rose plants? If yes, then your herb garden must be planted well away from the roses. Most herbs require full sun. They are not well-behaved plants and can look rather 'weedy' and unkempt.

Creating a raised bed for herbs is a good idea. The plants will stay cleaner and will be easier to tend.

Also look into an 'herb spiral' garden. Here is a link to show the herb spiral garden created by the owners/founders of NGA:
https://garden.org/learn/artic...
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland Composter Region: Mid-Atlantic Native Plants and Wildflowers
Keeper of Poultry Region: United States of America Dog Lover Cat Lover Birds
Image
sallyg
May 31, 2018 6:43 AM CST
That's -spiral- a cool design. I've always wanted to lay out some creative herb garden bed- they seem to lend themselves to geometric designs with places for individual herbs, whereas I think of ornamentals as mixing freely. google for images herb garden design.
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)
Name: Angie
Victoria, British Columbia, Ca (Zone 8b)
Ferns Region: Pacific Northwest Bee Lover Dragonflies Keeper of Poultry Clematis
Peonies Zinnias
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AngieVanIsld
May 31, 2018 11:03 AM CST
I like to grow herbs in pots on my patio for several reasons. Quick access and for control mostly. Depending on your zone some herbs can be quite invasive so you might want to do some research before planting some herbs. Mint can be highly invasive in a raised bed with other herbs in the right climate.
Name: Nancy Grace
Toronto
Image
nancyvinci
May 31, 2018 10:35 PM CST
Thanks, @sallyg for the suggestion. Do you have any other herb suggestion which grows fast and can be found easily?
Name: Nancy Grace
Toronto
Image
nancyvinci
May 31, 2018 10:40 PM CST
@greene, Those looks great... I'll try making one. Thanks for the share.
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland Composter Region: Mid-Atlantic Native Plants and Wildflowers
Keeper of Poultry Region: United States of America Dog Lover Cat Lover Birds
Image
sallyg
Jun 1, 2018 12:47 AM CST
Mint warnings, agreed. and for me, it blooms early summer, then looks crappy. Not my favorite plant.- but in spring when it is lush, so wonderful.

Parsley- easy to grow, plants and seed. Flat leaf is nice and flavorful. It is biennial, blooms second year, then dies off- though cutting bloom might keep it going. Voles love to eat the roots, so I grow it in pots.
Thyme is perennial and spreading. Easy to grow, but I don't use it much.
Dill, easy from seed, fast life cycle, be sure to cut and use before it blooms and dies. Plant from seed multiple crops if you like it.
Cilantro I have failed at- possibly needed cooler location than I gave it. Also was hard from seed, but then I recycled some potting mix and now have it growing in my Amaryllis, go figure...
That's about the extent of my herb experience. Smiling
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)

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