Plant ID forum: Succulent Questions

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Montreal, QC, Canada
plantwill
May 21, 2018 9:05 PM CST
Hello everyone!

I have had these succulents for a year now, but I don't know what they are, would you be able to help me out?

I also had a few questions about:

#1: when I first got it the leaves were straighter, and now are curved outwards. What could be causing that, is that normal?

#5: is this height normal for this succulent? A year ago it was 3x shorter... I know that stretching can be caused by low light, but it's on a S/E windowsill along with all the other ones!

Any help would be appreciated :)
Thumb of 2018-05-22/plantwill/8f2ad2
Thumb of 2018-05-22/plantwill/694086

Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
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Baja_Costero
May 21, 2018 9:29 PM CST
1. Haworthiopsis (ex Haworthia)
2. Aloe hybrid
3. Echeveria?
4. Echeveria pulidonis maybe
5. Ech. nodulosa

I don't see any problem with #1. That plant has the potential to form a nice full multi headed clump if you provide more space. It looks like it's already branching at the base. The bumpy aloe could use a little more space if you want it to be a happy clump. The plant in the last picture is a bit of a straggler by nature. The stronger the light, the better the situation in that regard, but your other plants look pretty good, so I don't think you will necessarily do too much better indoors.

What I would recommend for #5 (other than more light if that's at all possible) would be to cut the rosette at the end of the stem off and restart it as a cutting. You have to do that every few years with this plant. Nothing to be afraid of... just use a sharp knife to make the cut and leave about half an inch (1cm) of naked stem below the rosette. After a week or so to heal, pot up the cutting so that all the leaves are on top of the soil and only that little nubbin of stem is poking into the soil. Wait a week to water to be on the safe side. The cutting will look sad for a few weeks but then you will notice a change when it has roots and can take up water again. Keep the mother plant because she may very likely branch at the cut.
Montreal, QC, Canada
plantwill
May 22, 2018 2:51 PM CST
Thank you Baja!

For the ech. Nodulosa do you thinks it's large enough for propagation already? I was waiting a bit I still found the rosette small (see attached - penny for reference!)

For the Haworthiopsis, it is indeed branching, but not exactly at the base...is this common?
Thumb of 2018-05-22/plantwill/a85a0d
Thumb of 2018-05-22/plantwill/703848

Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
May 22, 2018 6:41 PM CST
Yes, that is how the plant is usually propagated, I think. Here is an example from a position in the sun (may not be your exact plant but in the general range) where you can see the effects of very strong light (the bronzing, the compact growth) and what a clump looks like after it has a year or two to proceed. I am planning to separate those offsets in the fall. I like to wait until they start to grow their own root systems, so they are fully independent upon separation.
Thumb of 2018-05-23/Baja_Costero/66971d
The branch at the base of your Echeveria nodulosa came at the perfect time. You can behead that plant (the main stem, that is) and the basal branch will grow strong in its absence. If that plant was mine I'd make the cut at ground level, through the main stem only, and allow the baby to replace the mother, and then repeat. Nature has done you a favor. It should be relatively easy to root a full-sized rosette.

Now if you're really intent on multiplying this plant, you can start by cutting near the end of the long stem and leave the rest to branch. When you force branches like that, they tend to sprout right below the rosette, fairly high on the stem, after beheading. You can wait until they're a little bigger than your current baby and then behead them to start new plants.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - May 22, 2018 6:42 PM (+)]
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Montreal, QC, Canada
plantwill
May 23, 2018 9:20 AM CST
Thank you so much Baja!

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