Ask a Question forum: (Indoor) Aloe Vera Info

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United Kingdom
OwenB
May 26, 2018 10:27 AM CST
Hi, I'm wondering if anybody may be able to offer any thoughts/information here regarding an indoor Aloe Vera. I've kept (house) plants for many years, so understand the fundamentals etc. I own various plants such as Yucca, Dragon Tree (Golden Coast), Dieffenbachia, ferns, and various cacti, and have them all in flourishing condition. This week, I decided to add an Aloe to my indoor jungle. It was purchased from my local garden centre, which is where 75% of my other's were obtained. I brought it home, let it sit (on a south facing window/United Kingdom) for a day or two before potting it out of it's cramped/root bound plastic growing container. It had been watered, probably a fortnight before, in the garden centre/store, so the soil was ever so slightly damp (knowing, like most cacti and succulents, that it's easy to over water these plants, I refrained from doing so myself). I potted up the plant shortly after it's purchase, in a (not over potted) terracotta pot, using cacti and succulent potting mix with added grit. I placed it on a south facing window in my house, where I have some other plants in said room, too. As stated, I haven't watered the Aloe myself yet, as it's received a watering not too long previous. The Aloe appears very healthy, with lovely thick green leaves and even a few pups, which I tenderly removed for propagation before potting the 'Mother'. After about three days, however, the tallest leaves of the Aloe itself have started to droop ever so slightly. When I purchased it, it was already carefully protected with a plastic loose wrapping, to save the leaves becoming bumped, so I'm not sure whether because of this, it now just needs to "spread out" so to speak. I'd be most grateful for any thoughts/information anybody could provide. Many thanks in advance, Owen. (The pics were taken at sunset, so apologies for the subdued lighting).
Thumb of 2018-05-26/OwenB/a0fb86


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Name: Will Creed
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WillC
May 26, 2018 5:07 PM CST
You seem to know what you are doing and have done a good job with your new Aloe. Aloe leaves are quite heavy and gravity will pull them down a bit. I don't see anything unusual about yours. Maximum sunlight will help keep them more sturdy.
Will Creed
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United Kingdom
OwenB
May 27, 2018 9:31 AM CST
Thanks for your response and info. Much appreciated. It hasn't dropped significantly more so since my initial inquiry, so I'm guessing after coming out of the (slightly cramped) protective cellophane from the store, it's now naturally just "opening up", then. Thanks again!
Name: Lin Vosbury
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)

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plantladylin
May 27, 2018 9:53 AM CST
Hi OwenB, Welcome!

I agree, it sounds like you are already very successful at growing houseplants and your
Aloe Vera (Aloe vera) looks very happy and healthy to me. I think it is just adjusting to it's new container and as WillC mentioned, be sure to give it as much sunlight as possible!

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United Kingdom
OwenB
May 27, 2018 12:23 PM CST
Hi plantladylin!

Thanks for the welcome and for your compliments and thoughts. Much appreciated! And yes, the Aloe is placed in the south-facing window of my house, so she's soaking up as much sun as possible, which in the UK can sometimes be a rarity! Smiling

Owen.
United Kingdom
OwenB
May 28, 2018 7:37 AM CST
OwenB said:Hi, I'm wondering if anybody may be able to offer any thoughts/information here regarding an indoor Aloe Vera. I've kept (house) plants for many years, so understand the fundamentals etc. I own various plants such as Yucca, Dragon Tree (Golden Coast), Dieffenbachia, ferns, and various cacti, and have them all in flourishing condition. This week, I decided to add an Aloe to my indoor jungle. It was purchased from my local garden centre, which is where 75% of my other's were obtained. I brought it home, let it sit (on a south facing window/United Kingdom) for a day or two before potting it out of it's cramped/root bound plastic growing container. It had been watered, probably a fortnight before, in the garden centre/store, so the soil was ever so slightly damp (knowing, like most cacti and succulents, that it's easy to over water these plants, I refrained from doing so myself). I potted up the plant shortly after it's purchase, in a (not over potted) terracotta pot, using cacti and succulent potting mix with added grit. I placed it on a south facing window in my house, where I have some other plants in said room, too. As stated, I haven't watered the Aloe myself yet, as it's received a watering not too long previous. The Aloe appears very healthy, with lovely thick green leaves and even a few pups, which I tenderly removed for propagation before potting the 'Mother'. After about three days, however, the tallest leaves of the Aloe itself have started to droop ever so slightly. When I purchased it, it was already carefully protected with a plastic loose wrapping, to save the leaves becoming bumped, so I'm not sure whether because of this, it now just needs to "spread out" so to speak. I'd be most grateful for any thoughts/information anybody could provide. Many thanks in advance, Owen. (The pics were taken at sunset, so apologies for the subdued lighting).
Thumb of 2018-05-26/OwenB/a0fb86


Thumb of 2018-05-26/OwenB/dd341c



Hello!

Just thought I'd leave a little update here regarding the Aloe. It's been almost a week since I initially purchased/potted it. Unfortunately it seems to be taking a downward spiral. As stated, I've been growing (house) plants for years and have experienced no problems. However, it seems the Aloe dislikes me! When I purchased it, it was a lovely vibrant green, the leaves were straight standing and full and plump. Now, however, the tallest leaves have started to wilt, they've become softer and thinner/more squishy, and the overall colour of the plant has turned from a beautiful green to a slightly duller tone. I still have refrained from watering it, (as I stated above, regarding its prior watering in the store). It's potted in (unglazed) terracotta, premium cacti/succulent potting mix (with added grit), and it's placed in a bright unfiltered southfacing window. I'm genuinely not sure what the problem could be. I'm hoping it's maybe just transplant shock, as it hasn't been overwatered nor under, and it (appears to) receives adequate light.

Owen.
Name: tarev
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tarev
May 28, 2018 11:32 AM CST
It could be a combination of both, transplant shock and the need for still much more stronger light. These plants can grow outdoors in full direct sun, so it is understandable it is still adjusting.

For the most part, what you have already done is okay. Just wait a bit more. It takes awhile for some plants to adjust to its new growing environment. Monitor the base of your plant and the center core. As long as it is not going mushy there, then maybe it is just adjusting. It enjoys temps of 70F (21C) and higher. Ideally I would have removed carefully all the old media and planted it in a dry media to help it adjust gradually from any root disturbance.
United Kingdom
OwenB
May 28, 2018 1:50 PM CST
tarev said:It could be a combination of both, transplant shock and the need for still much more stronger light. These plants can grow outdoors in full direct sun, so it is understandable it is still adjusting.

For the most part, what you have already done is okay. Just wait a bit more. It takes awhile for some plants to adjust to its new growing environment. Monitor the base of your plant and the center core. As long as it is not going mushy there, then maybe it is just adjusting. It enjoys temps of 70F (21C) and higher. Ideally I would have removed carefully all the old media and planted it in a dry media to help it adjust gradually from any root disturbance.


Hi,

Many thanks for the response and your thoughts. The core of the plant is still vibrate and firm, and I did take some (new) potting mix out of the packaging the day before potting to let it dry slightly/remove any excess moisture, so I'm slightly at a loss as to what to think, really. However, hopefully it is just adjusting to its new environment, so I'll keep a watch of it.

Owen.

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