Plant ID forum: Unknown tree.

Views: 178, Replies: 4 » Jump to the end
Name: Jared Nicholes
Nampa, Idaho
Image
jnicholes
May 31, 2018 9:08 AM CST
Hello,

I was out taking care of my garden today when I passed by a tree that was growing by my fence. I noticed this tree had a lot of small fruit on it. There are no trees like this in the area as far as I know. I'm trying to figure out what it is.

It's growing right next to the fence, and I don't want it to damage the fence. Trying to figure out if it's worth saving the tree.

Pictures of the fruits, the leaves, the bark, and the tree itself.

Thumb of 2018-05-31/jnicholes/bed0d0


Thumb of 2018-05-31/jnicholes/d6c832


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Thumb of 2018-05-31/jnicholes/851ac7

Jared
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
May 31, 2018 9:28 AM CST
Hi Jared

Its a Mulberry tree (Morus). The fruit is edible but some trees produce better fruit than others.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Jared Nicholes
Nampa, Idaho
Image
jnicholes
May 31, 2018 11:51 AM CST
Hello,

@Daisyl, thank you so much. I really appreciate the help.

I have no idea how the tree got there, but it's there. It's growing right next to the fence, literally.

How do you usually tell when the berries are ripe?

Thanks again,

Jared
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
May 31, 2018 1:07 PM CST
They will start falling from the tree - the ripe berries come off in your hand very easily, like picking ripe blackberries. Your tree was a gift from the birds.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
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ViburnumValley
May 31, 2018 5:32 PM CST
The darker the fruit - towards dark blue/black - the riper it is. You can squeeze them, too - softness is a good indicator.

If you like the flavor, you won't want to wait lest the birds take them and deposit seeds elsewhere. You will learn to test your tolerance for the gradation of tartness as you work back from full black ripe to deep red to reddish pink.

John

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