Plant ID forum→Type of tree

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St. Louis. MO
Dewayne63368
May 31, 2018 9:43 AM CST
Need help identifying tree
Gd daughter brought home from school
I live in St. Louis MO
Thumb of 2018-05-31/visitor/c54e60

Name: Celia
West Valley City, Utah (Zone 7a)
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Zencat
May 31, 2018 11:58 AM CST
I think it's an oak tree.
St. Louis. MO
Dewayne63368
May 31, 2018 12:07 PM CST
Thanks for your response
Someone else suggested that but all pic I look at don't look like a typical oak tree
Name: Kyle
Middle TN (Zone 7a)
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quercusnut
May 31, 2018 12:30 PM CST
It's an Oak. Probably Chinkapin Oak -- Quercus muehlenbergii. They are like weeds for me. A weed I love.
I currently have 63 different species, varieties and hybrids.
And welcome to garden.org. Big Grin
Welcome!
Name: Kyle
Middle TN (Zone 7a)
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quercusnut
May 31, 2018 12:42 PM CST
To add to the above. It could also possibly be Chestnut Oak -- Q. montana, Swamp Chestnut Oak -- Q. michauxii or another. Oak seedlings from different species can look very much alike.
I suggested Chinkapin because it is the most prolific for me. YMMV. Big Grin
St. Louis. MO
Dewayne63368
May 31, 2018 1:19 PM CST
Thanks for your help.. now one last question... will this variety of oak be aggressive and grow to extreme height?
Name: Kyle
Middle TN (Zone 7a)
Region: Tennessee Plant and/or Seed Trader Cat Lover Dog Lover Roses Ferns
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quercusnut
May 31, 2018 1:59 PM CST
No to the first question. Oaks aren't 'aggressive'. They are standalone magnificent trees. I would argue from extreme bias that they are the best of all trees. They create their own microclimate with their non-agressive roots among which you can grow an array of shade-loving plants. Then they provide nourishment for those plants with their leaves. Oaks are very welcome to adding compost, used potting soil, various mulches on top of their root systems whereby they and the plants they shelter thrive.
Don't know what you mean by 'extreme' height. For me? The taller the better. The taller they get the more beneficial high shade they provide for almost all plants. I have roses which bloom prolifically in the high filtered shade of my beloved oaks.
Thumb of 2018-05-31/quercusnut/44118f

Name: Ruud
The Netherlands
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RuuddeBlock
May 31, 2018 2:15 PM CST
I agree And I also love the great number of species living in / among those trees. So much more compared to f.e. Beech or any pine tree.

Ruud
St. Louis. MO
Dewayne63368
May 31, 2018 2:21 PM CST
Thanks again to all
Great site to know about
Dewayne63368
Name: Kyle
Middle TN (Zone 7a)
Region: Tennessee Plant and/or Seed Trader Cat Lover Dog Lover Roses Ferns
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quercusnut
May 31, 2018 3:42 PM CST
DeWayne, I don't know how old you are or how long you will live where you are now.
I was in my early 30's when I planted my first oak when I moved here 31 years ago. I kept adding more oaks to a barren worn out cotton field. I now live in a veritable forest of wonders. I spent those early years dreaming. Now I am living that dream.
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
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ViburnumValley
May 31, 2018 5:21 PM CST
That is certainly an Oak - Quercus sp.

Now, I'm going to tease Quercusnut, because all those species suggestions are from the White Oak group of Quercus species - and all members of that group lack bristle tips on the leaf margins.

I see a bunch of bristle tips on margins of the leaves in the photo above.

Young seedling oaks, growing vigorously, often have leaf morphology that varies from the standard characteristics of the species. But, things like bristle tips will be there regardless of whether the leaf is fatter or larger or appears less lobed than the normal that one is used to - or looks at on-line.

I'd bet dimes to acorns that your granddaughter has brought home a Red Oak - Quercus rubra. It is a fine tree - just as are all the ones Quercusnut mentions - and it will become a very big tree, potentially 100 feet tall and 2/3rds as wide, especially if it finds its happy spot to grow. If your yard or proposed site can't accommodate that large a tree, look for a friend's property, or possibly a local park location where it could live out its days.

I wouldn't argue with any of the praises already lavished above on this genus of trees, and would add that oaks support/host so many species of insects which provide food for birds and other fauna on which to raise their young.

John
Name: Kyle
Middle TN (Zone 7a)
Region: Tennessee Plant and/or Seed Trader Cat Lover Dog Lover Roses Ferns
Hostas Foliage Fan Bromeliad Heucheras Native Plants and Wildflowers Birds
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quercusnut
May 31, 2018 7:01 PM CST
John is probably correct. I see general impressions. He sees details.
I have Chinkapin and Shumard seedlings coming up everywhere. When they are really small they can look a lot alike. Some of them anyway.
I hope you can send more pics as it progresses.

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